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isbinil

Code quality at work

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Don't you feel when you're working on your games, that you make high quality code compared to the shit you see everyday at work ?

 

I'm a PHP developer and literally EVERY project I worked on had suber-shitty code, with retarded useless/duplicated/unreadable parts. I feel so bad for the developers who made that. I know sometimes the deadlines are shorts and you must rush it. But it feels really tiring to see the same shit after working in 5 different companies.

 

Don't you think it happens because of employers thinking developement can be done by any beginner ? Developer is often associated with "code monkey" (at least in France) and employers doesn't seems to understand that there are huge quality differences between the complete noob who made his personal website and professionnals with 5+ years of experience...

Edited by xxFuttBucker444

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Hah, opposite here.  I will program much sloppier on code for one of my hobby games.  Especially if it's a simple game and not a complex one.  At work we have code reviews before check-in, and have strict coding guidelines, as well as unit, functional and performance tests.

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Yeah it depends what the work culture is like. I've worked at places where the average talent was terrible and everyone coded like a high-school drop out from 1994... 

But I've also worked at places where the leads were amazingly good, and everyone strived to do a good job and become a better coder.

 

I generally write much better code at work, and then write really sloppy "seat of your pants" code on my personal hobby projects :lol:

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I routinely do stuff in my personal/side projects that would get me a stern glare from peer reviewers at work.

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I see both good and absolutely horrendous code at work. It's mostly just over-engineered though. At work I focus on creating clean, simple, readable and documented code.

I write both clean/idiomatic and unorthodox/batshit-insane code at home, just to see what kind of craziness is possible and whether it makes my life easier or not. Experiments that survive these tests may be cleaned up and adapted and then used at work. Edited by Nypyren

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As part of my job I need to audit all of our core code, and make sure it's super-clean and well documented.

 

At home I write garbage I can't understand 10 minutes after I look away.

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We've adopted new methodologies at work which I've carried over to my hobby projects, and similarly I've used hobby projects to learn new ideas that I've then suggested we adopt at work. There's more formality in place at my work, eg: Continuous Integration, Gated Checkins, the occasional code review, but there's not a "Work" and "Home" version of me as a developer, there's just me. :)

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When I see bad code at work I flag it for the next weekly code review meeting, where everyone can present whatever crappy code we see in the project and arrange to get it fixed.

 

When nobody flags anything we pick some randomly chosen files that haven't been reviewed recently and pick those instead.  We look for patterns that have changed or been created, coding style changes, dead/unused code, abstractions that can be moved up, consider creating or flattening or modifying inheritance hierarchies, renaming items, and more.

 

Whatever gets reviewed gets a comment at the top with the date, like: // Reviewed 2016-11-10  which prevents files from being reviewed too frequently -- but we still review them if they need changes -- and the comment lets us identify files that haven't been reviewed in a long time.  A simple grep searching for files that don't contain "// Reviewed 2016" gives great candidates for files to review and make current.  

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