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WinterDragon

started in python looking at some others for faster prototyping

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Okay so I'm finding python really easy to learn at 60pgs/wk of book study + exercises (4 proper programs so far) and coding (also bug fixing and research to figure out bugs)

I like python, I'm sticking with python.

Also plan to learn flask and python for android.

 

But I want something flash-like to prototype with, something fast.

I was going to use a retro language like Liberty BASIC.

"But now I'm looking at actionscript 3 to learn and Haxe to build in." - changed my mind about this.

 

I know very little about languages and their strengths and weaknesses.

I do know that I can get python, haxe, android-python and flask ebooks to study from - this is important for me, as I primarily learn from books. (not including the actual programming) I don't like videos and interactive learning as much. I grew up learning from books so it's easier for me. The more that are available the better IMO.

 

What do you guys know about haxe - I'm interested in the cross-platform-ability of haxe. Am I making my study redundant? can you think of a better estimated fit?

 

p.s. forgot to mention my goals.

I want to build games of my own design:

my inspirations are: The Sims,  Fez, Limbo, QWOP, Braid, Passage, Super Meat Boy, The Stanley Parable, Close Combat 1, Crimsonland, Another World, Rampage, Lemmings, Syphon Filter 1, Earthworm Jim, Hacker Evolution: Untold, Thomas Was Alone and Lisa RPG.

 

I want to build open source software, open source websites and indie video games.

I'm also keen to produce open source 3d digital playable simulations of mechatronic games/art.

ideas:

1. small MORPG with kingdom protect as the end goal after the adventures.

2. adventure rpg based on my graphic novel.

3. sim about hustling in high school with rpg elements.

4. an app for social change and life skills.

5. a website for playing games over a network.

6. a social network with severely (purposefully) limited forms of communication and also evolution of characters and exploration.

7. an online dating website.

8. a physics based arcade/rpg hybrid with simple shapes as characters.

9. a digital card game mixed with arcade-style hunting and strategy game style questing - with animated videos like Grim Fandango.

10. a 3d playable simulation of a robotic game and toy.

 

p.p.s.

 

Obviously I don't think my first step should be to try to make these huge projects of games and software.

I thought I would start by remaking some simpler games I love from days of olde: a version of land of illusion, asterix, gynoug, gain ground, rampage, kula world, maybe a point and click and hacker evolution: untold. And maybe a level from Lemmings, Syphon Filter and Earthworm Jim. And an improved version of Cosmic Spacehead on megadrive.

 

I think my very first step once I've got the hang of python is to build a level from Land of Illusion: Starring Mickey Mouse which was on sega master system.

Edited by WinterDragon

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It's been ages since I developed anything in ActionScript, so I have little idea of what's the current state of art, but if you like python, another option you might want to look into is Godot Engine. It has a scripting language strongly based on python, so that might make it easier to learn, and after browsing a bit through their documentation, looks like it could provide a similar developing experience as flash.

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I think you are already on the right track bro. python is one of the easiest to prototype and should have every thing you need to make a sims-like game. look into Panda3d or pygame. Java is a little more robust of a language and if you want to learn it then go for it but when ever i want to put out something fast i go python anyway. 

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I don't understand, why are you confused? Why all of a sudden do you think that Java might be the way to go? I'm not aware of any tool that lets you prototype faster in Java.

I doubt myself constantly, I was starting to think that maybe python on its own wouldn't be enough to do what I want to do.

And I like flash games as well as the more complex sims-like games. So I thought it would make sense to learn a fluid web based tool like Flash or Javascript as well as python. However, considering flash is passe' and javascript requires too many different elements html and css concepts, html5 and css3 study, and javascript itself - I was looking at other options.

Java for a minute seemed like the only well-resourced language not python and not as complicated as the C series and not requiring html5+css3. But after a sleep I realised that my doubts were causing me to make quick badly-thought through decisions. and I'm back to where I started.

 

So now I'm thinking python + engine. Panda 3d and pygame seem like a good choice because I don't want an engine where I don't know what's going on under the hood ie c# or javascript.

Edited by WinterDragon

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I don't understand, why are you confused? Why all of a sudden do you think that Java might be the way to go? I'm not aware of any tool that lets you prototype faster in Java.

I doubt myself constantly, I was starting to think that maybe python on its own wouldn't be enough to do what I want to do.

And I like flash games as well as the more complex sims-like games. So I thought it would make sense to learn a fluid web based tool like Flash or Javascript as well as python. However, considering flash is passe' and javascript requires too many different elements html and css concepts, html5 and css3 study, and javascript itself - I was looking at other options.

Java for a minute seemed like the only well-resourced language not python and not as complicated as the C series and not requiring html5+css3. But after a sleep I realised that my doubts were causing me to make quick badly-thought through decisions. and I'm back to where I started.

 

So now I'm thinking python + engine. Panda 3d and pygame seem like a good choice because I don't want an engine where I don't know what's going on under the hood ie c# or javascript.

 

What is it you're worried Python won't be able to do?

 

If anything you should probably set some goals on what it is you want to make before you worry about tools not being up to the task.

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I've been working through my first book on python and 160pgs the first time and 50pgs recently and still nothing about actually creating software. Just functions and syntax and definitions of keywords and how python works. So I started looking at something like flash to more quickly create interactive software.

 

I'm back to python now though.

 

My goals i mentioned in my original post. I want to make indie video games and open source apps/websites/software.

 

the types of games that inspire me and the types of games I want to make I also mentioned above.

 

My ideal specialisations would be simulations, rpgs/ccgs and adventure games.

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my first book on python and 160pgs the first time and 50pgs recently and still nothing about actually creating software. Just functions and syntax and definitions of keywords

I Think you are missing the point of python; functions syntax and keywords IS the software part. maybe you are just familiar with writing programs inside of another program. that's called scripting (python can be used as a scripting and a programing language) forget that book and do this:

  1. On your mobile device download a app called sololearn:  python (search for sololearn, they have great tutorials for a lot of common languages.)
  2. goto: python.org and download the python interpreter(<-- direct link to download for windows) the GUI program is called IDLE
  3.   python is a dynamic language, meaning that you don't have to compile it. just type in statement directly into the terminal and it will execute right there.
  4. use the app until you fill comfortable ( a little after you learn about objects)
  5. Write a simple text-based game ( maybe a choose your own adventure or something of that nature)
  6. choose between pygame or panda3d game engine( the 2 most popular or look around for some thing that suits you better. python.org has a list of all official libraries-and there are a lot)
  7. learn the API of the engine you like.( API: application programming interface, functions written to be easily understood by a person who doesn't have to know how it works like: engine.draw(character);)
  8. make a game 

This may seem like a lot, but steps 1-5 could be done in a weeks time( depending on how quickly you absorb it).

if you continue down this path, you will begin to learn how things work behind the scenes. ActionScript limits you to whatever someone else has programmed it to do, but this way is only limited by your imagination ( and skill :))

I encourage you to continue to learn programming, but it may be awhile before you get to the fun part if you don't already have a solid grasp of programming in general. the good news is that you first programming language is the hardest, and you will pick up another very quickly.

good luck.

Edited by Yeah_Phantom

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thanks, I'll try that.

Just to give you guys an idea of what I've been through uptill now.

 

Back in '91 I was a kid in what Americans might cool Junior High (we call it Intermediate) I learned my first programming language but I don't consider it my first because it was obsolete then - I used an emulator of a bbc micro on my family computer, an acorn archimedes to run BASIC and I typed code for software and games from a book and tweaked some of the code as I learned what the different elements did. Then I wrote two games, never finished them. one was a pong game with creepy faces (which I designed in pixel code) for the balls.

 

fast forward to high school and I learned logic, which was completely useless because nobody ended up using it in anything except robots for a while.

 

then about 2009 I bought dreamweaver and learned to make websites but I didn't conquer html and css, built my first website. Then ended up getting a job at a school designed and programming their website. I converted a template, stripped it down and rebuilt it with a little bit of javascript. I didn't know javascript so then I started studying javascript. 100 pages into my first book - was a time when html5 was coming out and my dreamweaver skills were becoming obsolete. So it was either learn html, css, javascript, css3, html5, etc. or just learn a programming language.

 

2013 - I started learning C# via university by distance learning, it took me a while to get the concepts so I failed the course.

 

2014 - I tried learning C++ to make games. Found it really complicated.

 

2015 - I tried C# again this time with a tutor, went through 25 hrs with my tutor. then gave up.

 

2016 - found python. I feel like I've come home, but I've been designing games for 28 years (as an amateur) so having to code to make games is a relatively new thing for me.

 

Thanks for the advice, just thought it would make more sense if you know what my adventure/background was like.

 

also most of the time I've been doing other things - writing, dealing with life, illness and 6.5 years of successful college education.

so my time hasn't been completely wasted by not discovering python until now.

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