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How long will C++ be around?

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C++ is going to be around for decades.

As for providing jobs well obviously people will be employed to write and maintain code but as with everything the number of people required will continue to be reduced.

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In some areas it's considered a standard.

How long? When people see no advantage in the language at all. 

It's like asking when hammers won't be used. As long as we keep prdoducing nails. 

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It will probably be around for a good long time, especially in the games industry.  The language keeps improving and adding new useful features, but still maintains backwards compatibility which is the killer feature.  The only real question is whether it will eventually have too much stuff added and will collapse under its own weight.  To that... I dont know.

 

This is an interesting talk on that subject.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltCgzYcpFUI

 

Keep in mind that most C++ compilers will only compile code into the executable if it's actually being used. It will ignore all code that is not going to be used, and will even optimize certain functions because it knows a better way to implement it. Plus the compilers themselves keeps improving and growing more efficient about how it handles things.

 

 

 

I don't think C++ will ever disappear. As most of the languages growing in popularity have been created with C++ or C.

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C++ has been around since the 1970s. How much longer will it be useful and provide people with jobs?
Why do you want to know?

 

It's a bad idea to bet on one egg in the basket. Diversify, learn several languages rather than just one. Learn several tools.

It will give you immediate benefits in being a better programmer as you understand the strong and weak points of a programming language better. It also makes you more flexible, you can just switch to a different language if the need arises.

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Until someone will start to think for a replacement without the garbage collection and with a higher expressiveness per line value, where that value is an unsigned integer. Of course the overhead per line must be equal or lower.

 

Good luck with your work ^_^

Edited by Alessio1989

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Very vague question, hence the multitude of answers. What exactly is your concern with longevity of C++? A lot of smart people on this forum have already added their say to that. There is more to software than, the present and the future. For agument sake, lets say C++ disappear tomorrow, what is suppose to happen, we just ditched all the software written in C++ then? No, thats not how it works. Software have a lifecycle and needs to be maintained, meaning that legacy systems will have to still be fixed/patched until they can be ported ( if thats in the plan ) or phased out. So I would not let the thought of C++ going away:
1. prevent one from learning the language.

2. prevent on from learning other language.

A language is just a tool use to express programming constructs to solve problems. One you have the fundamentals down, then the fear of being locked into a specific language become lesser with each new construct learned.

FORTRAN came out in the 50s or thereabouts and is still alive to a lesser extent today, so stop worrying and start coding.lol.
 

Edited by cgrant

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No.

Just no.


Java and C++ are diametrically opposed in many ways. Just because they use similar patterns of squiggly symbols does not make them similar languages.


Think of it like French and Esperanto. They both use the same alphabet, and a very small number of key concepts can transfer back and forth, but mostly they are just dramatically different.

 

But Apoch~! Java runs on billions of zillions of machines! :D

 

(Actually, C++ will be around until it finishes the process of turning into Java, then it will continue to gradually lose popularity.)

Edited by Khatharr

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I have updated my previous post with some more highly factual information.

By highly factual I assume you mean facts made up while high.  It's obvious you do not know what you're talking about because you made no mention of the Illiterati and the Quadrilateral Commission.  Or, maybe you're just trying to misdirect us from the truth?

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By highly factual I assume you mean facts made up while high.  It's obvious you do not know what you're talking about because you made no mention of the Illiterati and the Quadrilateral Commission.  Or, maybe you're just trying to misdirect us from the truth?

EDIT: After some contemplation, I've decided to be slightly more unbiased. I hope you will forgive my lashing out.

 

To be more complete in the highly factual information I posted earlier, I've attempted to include more, for the people out there not too familiar with this ancient and important governing body.

As far as I know, this is the details that all sides can agree on.

 

 

In late September of 1998, a splinter faction started gaining influence inside of SIGENL. This divide has been dubbed The Never-Ending September.

This faction, known as the Big Omicron, believes that forcing a EOL date actually hinders the natural evolution of languages.

They claim that by artificially ending a language, new languages are not actually required to be better or worse than their predecessors. If it is given that the reigning languages will fall away, they say, what is to stop the fledgling languages from lavishing and be content with simply floating to the top, instead of fighting their way there.

According to Big Omicron, this is what has led to the rampant growth of emojis and leet-speak. Big Omicron warns us that this is only the beginning; if there is no strict enforcement of natural language selection, the Illiterati (the ones who should not name) will gain power and ultimately bring down programming as we know it.

 

Contrast this to SIGENL, who believe that languages must be pruned for new languages to blossom.

 

Big Omicron is governed by the Quadrilateral Commission, which is comprised of 4 leaders of equal status, the 4 Vertices (The Vertex of Correctness, The Vertex of Protocol, The Vertex of Const, and The Vertex of Stack).

Communication is vital within the Quadrilateral Commission, and thus the 6 Messengers were appointed. Each Messenger deals only with 2 Vertices, delivering packets between them.

 

In times of urgent need, the 4 Vertices can go together and form The Surface -- a meeting in which all 4 Vertices must be present.

 

Naturally, there is a lot of conspiracy theories and fear-mongering on both sides of this language divide, and more detailed facts are entrusted only to members of their specific order.

Both sides agree, however, that they all want the same final output, they just do not see eye to eye when it comes to the implementation details.

 

Since the beginning of The Never-Ending September, there has been a minor group, called the Kernels, who believe that Big Omicron and SIGENL can make peace and link together in a dynamic fashion.

While a minor group, the group has some famous backers. Most notably, Green Day's song "Wake Me Up When September Ends" is a passionate cry for support to the Kernel's efforts.

Edited by Lactose

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All I can say is that it'd be nice if usage went down a bit and companies started investing aggressively in more sane alternatives (D, Rust, Go, who knows, whatever, as long as they invest in the tooling).

 

Right now you can code C++ in Visual Studio, QtCreator, CodeBlocks, Eclipse, Netbeans, CLion, Xcode, etc (plus power text editors, but I'd guess you can code anything with them). You have a couple of fully featured compilers, msvc compiler, gcc and llvm. Very few languages have that many options right now, even counting languages that should be much simpler to handle from a tooling standpoint. The moment you switch away thats the immediate cost you pay.

 

Hopefully in time it'll be lower.

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I was first made aware that C was dying by a series of adverts seriously talking about its eventual replacement; here's part of one...

 

"Used in 26 countries... you can afford to let your copy of C gather dust and switch to a useable language"

 

"a better language with a richer function set and it is much easier to learn and use than C"

 

I ignored the compelling warnings and invested some of my career in the obsolete C regardless -- and people still call me about C development roles. The advert is from July 1989 and C doesn't seem to have died the predicted death yet.

 

 

Calend's PCL which promised so much? Died so hard the only references I have to it are on paper...

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So all my posts were deleted. Nevermind, I didn't like some of them. I use C# and Java, but mostly C#. Years ago I learned a bit of C++, but you can assume that I don't know anything.

 
I bring you all the truth of what really makes new languages slow.
 
A common problem is trying to make a progrma run as fast as possible but, can you do that? I'm not even refering that sometimes the compilers are lagging out behind the CPU features, I'm talking a problem that is embedded in the language. Yes, you have primitives and references in Java. In C# you have value types (primitives and structs) and reference types. You can also arrange your data in cache friendly ways (people really need to talk more about this than language). You can also give hints to the compiler and sutff. You can also use a few keywords here and there to make tricks and not go bananas with memory allocations, but that's generally not enough, you are stuck with reference types and value types. In C# there's also unsafe code, but who uses that? And I don't know what kind of black magic goes inside the JVM, so let other people explain that minuscule problem.
Edited by RenzoCoppola

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