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A Book on DOS

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Sveral years ago someone recommended a DOS book to me called The Little DOS Book.  Although I never bought it  I am now interested in purchasing a book on DOS.  There are many version of DOS so I was wondering if anyone could recommend a book for me.  I think I want a quick reference book for the commands I really should know being a programmer,  probably the fundamentals.  I would like a book that will work on the set of computers that an entry level / intermediate programmer would encounter.  Also, DOS I may encounter working on a few different Microsoft operating systems here at the apartment would be great.  A littler book might also be great !

 

 

Thank you for your DOS expertise,

 

JoshuaE 

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Using DOS or programming for DOS or DOS internals?

 

And just so you know for modern programming you don't need to know anything about DOS... DOS as an OS basically died with Windows 2000, the last OS with a DOS core IIRC was Windows ME.  But basic dos commands are still accessible through command.exe or command.com (forgot which).

 

Microsoft is phasing out command in favor of powershell IIRC.

 

edit - actually windows 2000 wasn't that popular so it really died with WinXP.

Edited by Infinisearch

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Just basic DOS commands, batch file, make, piping etc. using command.exe.  I just wanted to avoid any embarrassment at any job.  I guess a book on MS-dos for the year 2000 or later would do.  I though maybe there would be a solution that would make me efficient to the basic dos commands on anything possible, however unlikely, left using it.  The PC for example, and anything else:  Mac, Linux, Unix, etc.

 

Wonderingly,

 

JoshuaE

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I imagine you mean you want to learn about the command line.  In Microsoft Windows you're looking at how to use CMD.EXE, aka batch scripting and sometimes colloquially and misleadingly known as the 'DOS prompt'.  On OS X, Linux, and other Posix systems you'd want to learn about the Bourne shell and its variant bash.  Note that none of these are DOS, so looking for a book on DOS may well be an exercise in futility.

 

You'll find CMD.EXE works pretty much the same for all Microsoft operating systems, including Microsoft Windows and, um, well, there is only one Microsoft operating system it works with since they abandoned Xenix, MS-DOS, and OS/2.

 

Your best bet for getting expert on batch scripting is to find one or more tutorial on the web (I searched for batch script and found a plethora), open a CMD window, and hackitty hack hack away.  Same goes for learning bash, except you'll probably want to install Bash on Ubuntu on Windows first.

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PowerShell really comes into its own when you use its .Net integration. C# or VB.Net are the front runners for good languages to use alongside PowerShell IMO.

That said, you can still benefit greatly from learning it. It won't make you a better C++ programmer but it will give you more skills in using your computer.



[edit] I say this as a C++ programmer who spends a decent amount of time in PowerShell command prompts, by the way. Edited by ApochPiQ

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on a dos pc, you can type "help" at the command line to get a list of all dos commands, both internal (built into cmd.com) and external (stand alone programs).

 

you can type "help <commandname>" to get help on a specific command, including all switches etc.

 

batch files are handy for automating tasks performed in the OS, like copying files and running programs.  i use batch files to make second copies of source files for projects - in case the power goes out during a save. i run them after every successful build, before i run the game to test the latest changes.

 

command line compiling is about the only C++ specific use for the command line interface.

Edited by Norman Barrows

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