• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

How to make 32 bits sprites

This topic is 459 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

HI everyone! I want to make a videogame but i want to use 32 bits graphics, What programs can I use to create sprites or how can i make them?

I really appreciate your help. :D :D

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

What exactly do you mean by 32bit graphics?  32bits per pixel?  If so almost any image editor supports that format so you could use a generic image editing suite like GIMP or Photoshop or <insert image editor program here>.  You could also use a program specifically aimed at making sprites... the only one I can remember off hand is spriter pro.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sprites are just images, like PNG files, that you load and display at the screen. A video game displays dozens to tens of thousands of them, in all sorts of colours, shapes, and sizes. The technical term for 32bit graphics is RGBA, with 8 bit channels (red/green/blue/alpha are 4 channels, each 8 bit wide, so you end up with 32bit for each pixel). Another popular format is RGB with 8 bit channels, but without the alpha, the opacity (which is the reverse of transparency).

 

Since a sprite is an image, you can make them with pretty much any image editor, since almost every image editor can produce RGBA images. It starts with simple editors like paint, goes up to more professional editors like gimp or photoshop. There are also dedicated sprite editors, or animation editors. Other production techniques are using 3D modelers, and rendering images from it.

 

As for how to make them, the simple explanation is "open an image editor, and start drawing pixels until happy". To draw really nice sprites however, you need to practice a lot, it's a skill. You may want to ask further questions about this subject in the "visual arts" sub-forum, which covers everything you'd want to know (and more) about making extremely nice pixel collections.

Likely there is an extensive FAQ there about tools and how to become a good graphics artist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You use a 32bit palette and you can use your favorite tool to draw something with that palette. Usually 32 bit that includes an alpha channel that has 8 bits for each RGB value and another 8 bit for alpha transparency. 8 bits account for 256 combinations and each channel can be combined with each other to create 256*256*256 = 16.777.216 colors. And then you still have the alpha with 32bit you can use to create transparency on your sprites. However, those old systems could not display all those colors at once, the SNES did 256 concurrent colors I believe. So if you want to mimic a oldschool art style you need to use a reduced palette, however 256 colors is still a lot if you know what people can do with just 16 colors. Using such a limited palette requires you to have excellent color knowledge and use advance pixel art techniques like dithering, anti-aliasing, etc.

 

So, it depends. If you want to mimic a specific style you need a similar palette, nowadays you can cheat your way by just creating a pallette of X colors save it and use it in your engine or framework of choice. But if you want it to be truely 32 bit I guess you need to program it the way they used too but it's not going to add to the ecstatics in any way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you mean sprites in the style of early 32 bit games, like jazz jackrabbit for pc (DOS) then your best option is to look at screenshots, zoom in and analyse the styles used.

I'm not an artist so I can't really give style advice, I generally just enhance and adjust existing art, and occasionally make the odd texture or material. However, this is where I'd begin. Note that a lot of these games actually used palletised 8 bit colour due to memory and video copying speed constraints, some used 16 or 24 bit VESA modes.

If on the other hand you just mean "sprites with 32 bit colour depth", see above.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok thanks everyone to be more specific i want to make chararecters like megaman x6 style (obviously my own characters in that style) :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haha. Megaman x6 is a bit more than 32-bit, and from that reference it sounds like you're looking for a sidescroller setup. If you want to make it all on your own, all you need is an image editor of some sort, as the people above stated. Paint in Gimp, export as transparent .png files, load it into the game engine you're working with.

 

So, if you have the ability to draw Megaman-like graphics, all you need is to know the scale. I'm doing a game in the style of retro 2d JRPGs, so I made each of my engine 'units' 32 pixels long. My characters are 32 pixels wide and about 48 pixels tall. My terrain and furniture and such is scaled to that. If I had made my characters 128 pixels tall, I'd be able to detail them much more, and that would give you a different look.

 

Anyway. Go find the graphics you like and figure out how the artist made them. You'll learn a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement