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I'm being told I must be fudging a lot om my resume, since it's too impressive....

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Sigh,

 

1. So this is something that has been happening a lot in the past month, even by my friends who know I'm telling the truth.

 

Sure, a lot of people puff up their resume about 15-20%, it's expected.

I don't.

 

If you see a figure or a result, or a title, it happened, as I put it. or it's a conservative estimate.

 

My friends are telling me that even them knowing me, and who have been an active part of the organizations I'm listing still find it hard to believe. And if they didn't know me, and were reviewing the document for the 1st time, would think this person is/ might be delusional.

 

2. The core issue seems to be, that it only really makes sense to those in and around the games industry, any other industry professional has no idea what any of it means, even tho I break it down in conventional business terms, as well as detailed transferable skills. (including a lot of tech companies)

 

The reaction most people seem to have is not knowing what to make of me or my experience, because it seems in this world, people want single hat specialists, not multi hat generalists.

 

As a producer, I'm basically an administrative generalist.

 

But since they don't know what is going on, with my remote experience, they just assume it's all worthless, since they don't understand, and have any frame of reference.Or, they think I have no career focus, which can't be further from the truth.

 

A while ago, I was told by several people, to remove all my games experience, so I tried that for one version, and it looked so depressing, it made me look like a totally green cookie cutter college student/ grad. 

 

It's better now with remote experience, then it was before 2013, due to what happened with Yahoo, but some older hiring managers (late 30s, to 40s+) are still the same way...

 

3. I have 5+ years of volunteer project management experience and 3 years of clan management experience (which I did concurrently at school) , and a year and a half of in person work experience. 1 year in management for a nonprofit. (which I did after I graduated college), that is just the broad strokes. 

 

I realized a while back, that I learned way more in my volunteer projects, then all the years of schooling.

 

Not to mention, all the ways I have proof of it all, they just need to look it up on linkedin or google, or check my references. (Which 99% of people don't bother with while screening resumes in the initial stages, because your meant to do it later, if they pass, initial screenings.)

 

4. I'm not able to get to some interviews, to actually show them anything.

And when I do make it, they usually steer the conversations around my remote experience, and don't ask any questions about any of it. 

Sometimes I bring it up, and they just give me these blank stares with a nice smile on their face, I try my best to explain how I'm not playing games but it's clear a lot still don't get it.

 

5. All my volunteer experience is way more impressive and had way more an impact, then any of my in person paid gigs, and if I emphasize that too much,  it puts me in the big leagues, with those who have been paid for it all, which I usually lose out to. But having so much supervisory experience by my mid 20s makes me look overqualified, and in some cases  looked down on, if I go and take an entry level conventional job, that is meant to be for people in my cohort. (or others ~2 years out of college.)

 

6. Most of my volunteer experience is not for conventional feel good causes, I notice how people react to others who have say a few months with an identifiable cause, vs. how they react to me, with years of volunteer gamedev.

 

7. Furthermore, from all I've learned about modding and indie, it's incredibly rare to find people who have been working on a single project for so long, let alone with a large team of 15+

 

8. The other thing is, I don't "look" like or "act" like, what conventional society and standard business stereotypes would demand and expect for a person with such managerial experience/ success.

 

Maybe if I was a 6 foot tall handsome looking white extremely extroverted serious type, it would  get their attention and respect for what I've accomplished?

 

The high level of my resume doesn't really match my usual style and personality.

In other words, I'm way more polished and impressive online, than I usually am in person. 

Edited by GeneralJist

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3. I have 5+ years of volunteer project management experience and 3 years of clan management experience (which I did concurrently at school) , and a year and a half of in person work experience. 1 year in management for a nonprofit. (which I did after I graduate college), that is just the broad strokes.


Put that on the resume, pretty much just like that. List just the rough summaries of what you did on each project.

One exception: If you're not applying to a game-specific company, they may not know what "clan" means. I personally would not list clan experience on a resume.

I realized a while back, that I learned way more in my volunteer projects, then all the years of schooling.


As it should be! This is true for most professional career types.


But having so much supervisory experience by my mid 20s makes me look overqualified


Don't put your age on your resume if you live in a country that has laws against age-based discrimination.


6. The other thing is, I don't "look" like or "act" like, what conventional society and standard business stereotypes would demand and expect for a person with such managerial experience/ success.
 
Maybe if I was a 6 foot tall handsome looking white extremely extroverted serious type, it would  get their attention and respect for what I've accomplished?
 
The high level of my resume doesn't really match my usual style and personality.
In other words, I'm way more polished and impressive online, than I usually am in person.


Always trust your instincts when they tell you to improve yourself. Have confidence and improve what you can. Nobody expects you to change your entire identity, though.

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Thanks,

I don't put my age, but I usually put the graduation years of my schools, and they can figure from that.

 

I did a version without grad dates, it might get me better results, but if I do that, it might not be clear I did things concurrently when I was at school, and might make me look like some stay at home bumb who did volunteer stuff, while relying on others to make rent, which is not who I am at all.

 

I find myself in this weird catch 22.

 

As for the Clan, no, I don't call it a clan, I call it a community, normally I'd agree, not to put it on, but I Co-founded it, and was in the command staff for a long time. I've thought about removing it all together, but every time I do, I realize how big a part of my life it was, and how much I learned about myself and others from it. 

I also did research on it, which I'm getting published.

 

I asked one of my good friends, who did it with me for the longest, what people thought of me, and she said people were essentially split in 2 camps:

 

A. were annoyed that I wasn't there for the game, that I took clan management too seriously.

B. Were glad I took it all so seriously, so they didn't have to.

 

At one point, we did have 150+ people witch I mostly recruited.

Edited by GeneralJist

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I actually had this exact same issue when I first started "working" professionally. My advice would be to get a junior/entry level job instead of one you're more qualified for, then keep applying to more senior jobs.

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IDK,

maybe advice as to another way of looking at this all?

 

Maybe I'm doing something wrong?

 

The only solution I can figure is to get into a name brand company, to prove I can be mainstream.

 

The other thing I realized might be an issue, is all the stuff I've done, money was not the main motivating factor, so  maybe people are threatened by that? or that they don't know how to manage or motivate me?

 

That I don't fit in their standard box of how and why people work?

 

How do I try and overcome that?

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maybe advice as to another way of looking at this all?

 

It's possible that the people who are telling you that you're inflating your resume are wrong, but it's also possible they're right (or more realistically the truth is somewhere along those extremes).

 

"Another way to look at this" is to accept that you might be wholly or partially wrong. It is difficult to say without seeing your actual resume and the actual way you are presenting yourself, and it's also difficult to say without knowing what you're actually aiming for.

 

I completely agree with frob's post, above.

 

The amount of professional experience you have puts you solidly in the "junior" category, and if you're trying to apply for jobs demanding more experience with the idea that you non-professional experience is equivalent, that's very likely to get your resume dismissed, and I wouldn't be surprised if it caused people to read your attempt as one to "inflate" your accomplishments.

 

Professional experience and non-professional experience are different. They teach you different things, they require different things, and they have different challenges and benefits.

Edited by Josh Petrie

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Odds are half the stuff in your resume is stuff the company doesn't care about - thus inflating it.

 

Witness: Frob's point about actual experience vs all the other stuff you claim as experience. 

 

Make a quick resume that only includes your conventional training and actual work experience. in the eyes of 90% of the world, that is your marketable skill set.

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ya, ok,

I posted the OP without my resume since I wanted to just get this general feedback on my perception, before the nitty gritty.

 

I've cleaned up my resume since this version, and removed most of the double line formatting, at the request of a professional recruiter I'm working with, but here is a version of a version that had been in circulation for a few months:

 

I moved Animus interactive to volunteer experience at the request of the recruiter.

 

Edit:

Hmm,

So according to that link to Tom's FAQ, my hobby project isn't "experience", until it's released?

 

And none of the clan community stuff is "experience" either, even tho if you talk to anyone who's actually ran a guild/ clan for a significant period of time considers it as a job? (regardless of how many people were there, let alone over 100+...)

 

The transferable skills may not be exactly the same, but I find it hard to accept it's meaningless in a paid work context.

 

I find myself soft skills rich, but hard skills poor.

Edited by Josh Petrie

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