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EricV

After a player has "beaten" a puzzle game

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When the player has solved my puzzle, it's very clear from the video that plays. I thought of having the app just quit after playing the video, but that might be abrupt and disconcerting.

I could present options [Play again] and [Quit], but [Play again] is a little ridiculous, or might suggest that there's another level or something. Having just a quit button is awkward too--if there's only one thing to do, why does the player have to do it?

Thoughts? Is there a more elegant way to handle the situation?

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Could always put like a "Thank you for playing" kind of screen up, or a congrats on completing it.

If you dont feel having a play again is worthwhile for a small game I usually find (when playing them) just a static screen with some nice like thank you text or something a fairly appropriate way to offer an exit / close button

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Could always put like a "Thank you for playing" kind of screen up, or a congrats on completing it.

If you dont feel having a play again is worthwhile for a small game I usually find (when playing them) just a static screen with some nice like thank you text or something a fairly appropriate way to offer an exit / close button

Thank you, GibbonThatCodes. Your response makes me feel more comfortable with just having an exit/close button. (The video actually ends with those exact words, "Thank you for playing.")

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Exit to main menu after cinematic.
Unlock bonus levels / content / challenges.

Ithe cinematic and quit-to-menu is a tried-and-true method of telling the player that the game has been completed. Bonus content/levels offers some replayability to the game, and can allow for new mechanics to be added that may not have fit in the original game.

A *time race* or *death count* scoreboard showing the players fastest completion of the standard levels. This is probably the simplest way to add replayability without actually adding any new content to the game.

New levels, or harder optional levels that are unlocked after completing the game. If you show these as an inaccessible option on the menu, it actually incentivizes completion of the game. Alternatively, options for changing the mechanics of the original game. Such as 'low gravity' or 'the floor is lava', or 'you can shoot the hazards' etcetera. make sure that the game is still completeable with the modifications of course.

Bonus content. Again, showing, but not allowing access to this, can incentivize completion of the game to players. If your game is artistically focused, or story focused, this bonus content could be as simple as *here's some related drawings and storyline or lore*

Bonus content to A DIFFERENT GAME. This can incentivize players to complete the game, and *ALSO* incentivizes them to play other games you have made. For example, if completing one game gives you a 'code' to unlock a new campaign in your other game, players are more likely to play that other game so that they can use the content they unlocked. As well, players of the *other* game are also more likely to play *this* game so that they can unlock the additional content. This is free exposure and advertisement of your other products, and more revenue if they are paid games. Don't abuse this though, the bonus content should actually be something the players look forward to and enjoy, not tricking them into playing your other game, only to be disappointed by the content.

Edited by nullie

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Thank you, Nullie. My game is relatively simple, but these are good and thought-provoking ideas, especially for how to connect my current game and my next, larger one. Thank you for your input.

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Depending on the game mechanics, perhaps customization options or a sandbox mode could be fun. If your game involves limited uses of any kind of ability/mechanic, unlocking unlimited uses can be really rewarding for players who loved that particular part of your game.

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