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Need more ideas for Top Down Shooter

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So-far I have this much on the planning stage of my game. So Request any thing that you think would be a good feature.

SURVIVE The Outbreak

The all new Top-Down shooter.

  • Shooting Zombies with side missions pretty much.

 

  • W,A,S,D
  • LMOUSE To shoot
  • Scroll wheel (or hotkeys) to rotate weapons
  • 4 Weapons
  •  (Slot 1) Assault Rifle
  •  (Slot 2) Shotgun
  • (Slot 3) Pistol
  •  (Slot 4) Sword
  • 12 Missions for Campaign
  • 2 locations for the Campaign
  • Wilson County
  • Gale City
  • 2 Playable Characters.
  • Lumberjack (Red hair, Red Plaid Shirt, Ripped Jeans, Purple Beanie.
  • Rick (Bald, Sweat Pants, White Tank Top, Pale.
Edited by StevenCGM

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When would the player use the pistol? The assault rifle should shoot more lethal bullets quicker and at greater range, the shotgun should allow more lenient aiming. Is it going to be the sad fallback weapon the player copes with in case of ammo scarcity?

In addition to swords, consider axes (more damage and/or faster, closer range and worse defense), since you have a lumberjack. Other classic quasi-weapons, like scythes and chainsaws, or modern tools, like grass trimmers, hedge cutters and blowtorches could be appropriate or too silly depending on the tone.

What do you plan to vary between missions? Are there going to be zombies of different types or with different equipment?

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So Request any thing that you think would be a good feature.

What you have is not really a game idea.  What you have is some button mappings, some types of weapons, and some minor art direction.

 

The next step for you is to list all the game mechanics. As an example, you wouldn't think about the old Super Mario Bros as maps, instead you would think about the mechanics of jumping underneath to smash a block, or to release a single coin or a single powerup, or to release a bunch of coins with multiple hits; you would think about hidden blocks as a secret bonus; you would think about jumping on enemies to defeat them, with some enemies leaving useful objects behind like shells; you would think about moving platforms and bottomless pits; you would think about pipes that do nothing and secret pipes that transport you to other zones.  Each of those are mechanics, and games have many of them.

Good games have a small number of mechanics which are easily understood, but they can interact in ways that provide deep and meaningful gameplay.  Think about Portal, you have the mechanic of portals between two places, buttons that open doors/gates, a cube drop on things, turrets that shoot in one direction, and death zones. With those few mechanics there is a rich game that is part puzzle and part action RPG.

Refining the mechanics is perhaps the most critical part of designing a game. Figuring out how you will cause everything to interact defines the core of gameplay.  After that is the design of teaching players to use the mechanics, and then the design of how to use the mechanics through the game.

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When would the player use the pistol? The assault rifle should shoot more lethal bullets quicker and at greater range, the shotgun should allow more lenient aiming. Is it going to be the sad fallback weapon the player copes with in case of ammo scarcity?

In addition to swords, consider axes (more damage and/or faster, closer range and worse defense), since you have a lumberjack. Other classic quasi-weapons, like scythes and chainsaws, or modern tools, like grass trimmers, hedge cutters and blowtorches could be appropriate or too silly depending on the tone.

What do you plan to vary between missions? Are there going to be zombies of different types or with different equipment?

There will be limited ammo for each weapon per misson.Yes there will be variety between mission, Example 1 would be hack and slash then the next will be quest based etc.

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How about:

Player is dropped into the level, with limited resources. All resources gets reset each level so not using them is a waste.

Because of the limited resources and huge amount of zombies, you add in environment traps that players can use.

Add in a way to make noise, maybe the player presses a button and the melee weapon is banged against obstacles and the floor. The player can use this to both draw zombies away and into traps.

 

The above mechanics is enough to make it's own full game, play with these ideas and see what you get.

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What you have is not really a game idea. What you have is some button mappings, some types of weapons, and some minor art direction. The next step for you is to list all the game mechanics.

Top-down shooters might appear simple, but even very basic mechanics can have a huge impact. For example:

  • Movement, facing and aiming controls. You chose 8-way constrained movement, unconstrained aiming and presumably automatic facing, but why?
    Are you conscious of the implications, or just defaulting to an easy to implement simple scheme?
    • Hunting pixels with the mouse can enable trick shots (e.g. sniping through narrow gaps, taking advantage of bouncing projectiles) or just annoy the player.
    • Choosing a shooting direction (rather than a target) is inaccurate. Shots will be oblique..
    • As the player moves, continuing to shoot in the same direction requires precisely matching mouse and character velocity. Shooting while not moving is much easier and usually more effective
    • If zombie walking directions are constrained like player movement, zombie mobs might be unnaturally aligned and clustered; if they walk freely they are more agile than the player, which is probably silly.
    • Circle strafing is going to degrade to square or octagon strafing.
    • With orthogonal walls and constrained movement, characters either follow them exactly or stop; with oblique walls in arbitrary directions characters slide along them.
    • Is it possible to run through open areas without hitting obstacles and zombies and without being attacked too much?
    • How much does dodging disrupt aiming?
  • Enemy movement
    • Eluding slow/dumb enemies with speed or stealth vs. thorough extermination with no progress until threats are cleared
    • Enemies who move around and offer opportunities vs. enemies who wait without disrupting their defensive positions and formations
    • Swarms that require efficient combat vs. major enemies that require effective combat.
  • Weapon range
    • Tactically significant or trivial depending on map size
    • More or less explicitly shown

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Top-down shooters might appear simple, but even very basic mechanics can have a huge impact.

Yes, those are just a few of an enormous list of mechanics details.

Just saying "Top down shooter" implies a few mechanics, but there is a long list of details that all need to be sorted out and considered in the design.  

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I don't think we can really help much. It's your game, find what you think is cool and start building it!

 

If you get specific questions about whether a particular system or idea will work, then we can give some input.

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Shooting a zombie is boring in itself because it has already been many times.

 

Try to add something new and unexpected to the game.

Example: In one Russian team in the project B0-R15. You do not play for a paratrooper or even a person, but for a mutant bear in a vest.

http://www.gamedev.ru/projects/forum/?id=211200

 

Do not be afraid to experiment and try something extraordinary.

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Example: In one Russian team in the project B0-R15. You do not play for a paratrooper or even a person, but for a mutant bear in a vest.

If, instead of a human, a mutant bear in a vest kills zombies, what's the difference? Increased perimeter and cross section? Much better melee combat? Trouble using weapons?

It might be a cool character (the graphics in the link are quite pretty), and the gameplay differences might be improvements, but I don't see how a change of personnel would suffice to make the zombie killing activity "less boring".

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Example: In one Russian team in the project B0-R15. You do not play for a paratrooper or even a person, but for a mutant bear in a vest.

If, instead of a human, a mutant bear in a vest kills zombies, what's the difference? Increased perimeter and cross section? Much better melee combat? Trouble using weapons?

It might be a cool character (the graphics in the link are quite pretty), and the gameplay differences might be improvements, but I don't see how a change of personnel would suffice to make the zombie killing activity "less boring".

 

I did not say that if you made the main character: Bear, Skeleton, Alien, or whatever. That then your game will be dramatically interesting.
 
The fact that I wanted to say that you should not be shy in the experiments with the network and the plot.
 
Let me give you another example ... Joakim Sandberg And his Noitu Love 2.
 
The game is a standard fighting game platformer. You can compare with Megamen and Metroid.
 
The game uses the usual and familiar to the player mechanics in the game.
 
Then why did I remember this game ... There were a lot of  chips that I did not see anywhere else.
1) He changed the control of the game ... With buttons that in most games of this type. After setting the attacks and blocks on the bear.
2) He tied up several mechanics for some of the characters on the teddy bear. Adding interesting chips in them. (You will understand if you play for all the characters.For such a young and old game. Passage for each character feels like passing through a different game.)
3) He wrote a history of the world around. Which gave birth to the original setting game.
 
PS: Although the game has a lot in common with other games, it has a lot of its own that it shows.
1) The same with your game. Come up with a world in which events take place, think through the plot and characters. And they do not have to be for a sight. All this should be interesting.
2) Create a setting based on the story. Unique and only your own.
3) Experiment with mechanics and look for ways to use them unusually.
 
Look at these games, they can inspire you: Bastion, Transistor, oceanhorn, Torchlight, Hyper Light Drifter and others.
But it's best to just let go of your imagination. And come up with something perfect new. Something your own. You must have a picture of what you want to create in your head. You must see what should be created before it is actually created.
Edited by White_crow

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