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How 2D platform world is created? (LWJGL 3)

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Hi,

First of all, I'm not sure if this is the right place for this topic, so correct me if I'm wrong.

I was wondering how 2D platform worlds are created? I know the tilesbased-approach,but it looks too sharp (of course you can make smooth tiles, but I don't like that solution) and I was thinking about something more elegant (just like in Badland). 

Maybe creating 2D models (i.g. in blender) and then load them into the game as a "terrains", but then how to make them look so smooth and create good collisions for them (without smoothing with thousands of vertices)? 

Kind regards!

 

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From what I recall, Badlands doesn't look too technically challenging, they've just got amazing art.

Usually it is a mix of art assets, physics assets (often corresponding to the outlines of art assets), animation assets (that say how they move), audio assets, code that makes the pieces do the things, and map/level assets (telling where the other three belong in the world and how they combine together)

For the platform worlds, building blocks are common, as are artist-drawn collision maps that describe the footprint of objects or the shape of areas that can be navigated.  The two can even work together, an artist draws the artwork for platform segments (often both endpoints and some repeatable middle segments) along with the collision shape for them, both can be placed by designers in the map or level data.  Or if they prefer, artists can build a more complete environment with an environment-wide navigation mesh, but this has drawbacks because it makes for enormous graphics files. A small number of objects placed many times takes up less resources than an enormous world.  But for some games and some levels having a fully-composed large element can make sense.

Games often begin with ugly building blocks, gray/white/black boxes and spheres and arcs, and other placeholder art until midway through development. Artists do their magic and replace the platform levels still act the same with blocks and boxy platforms and other shapes, but the art makes the world beautiful, and items appearing in the foreground and background don't affect gameplay but make the game come alive.

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Hi there. I was actually just wondering the same question as well regarding various ways to build 2d worlds (mostly interested in topdown) . I came across this article earlier, which you might find helpful (http://higherorderfun.com/blog/2012/05/20/the-guide-to-implementing-2d-platformers/ ) . See Type 3: Bitmask, and Type 4: Vectorial 

 

Any other resources that you guys recommend for learning more about building/rendering 2d worlds (whether platformer/topdown) ? Not to hijack the thread, but the effect I'm intersted in is something like this (

) . It has playstation style graphics. I doubt the environment (floors, etc..) are laid out in a tile based manner . Just curious as to what I can read to learn more about implementing such environment/graphic style. 

Edited by kuroro_san

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The graphics in the video is real 3D with a topdown camera on a low resolution texture and then scaled up to get the pixelart style. I guess the shadows are created with some kind of bsp-tree to get all walls in the level and then extrude them behind the camera (like watching through a long pipe). so the shadows will automatically overdraw the invisible scene. Maybe they also use a modified projection matrix to draw the shadows with a little more fisheye effect.

Edited by Auskennfuchs

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