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    • By 51mon
      Hey
      I'm dealing with ribbons following the shape of multiple spline segments. It's straightforward to compute the direction at any point along the spline. However the ribbon also got a flat shape and I'm struggling with finding a way to compute the angle of the ribbon in the plane perpendicular to the direction.
      To illustrate what I mean here's a piece of code that almost worked:
      float3x3 rotMtxFromSpline; rotMtxFromSpline[1] = normalize(splineDir); rotMtxFromSpline[0] = normalize(cross(float3(1, 0, 0), rotMtxFromSpline[1])); rotMtxFromSpline[2] = cross(rotMtxFromSpline[0], rotMtxFromSpline[1]); // Rotate rotMtxFromSpline[0] in the rotMtxFromSpline[0]-rotMtxFromSpline[2]-plane to align with float3(0, 0, 1) dir rotMtxFromSpline[0] = normalize(dot(rotMtxFromSpline[0], float3(0, 0, 1)) * rotMtxFromSpline[0] + dot(rotMtxFromSpline[2], float3(0, 0, 1)) * rotMtxFromSpline[2]); rotMtxFromSpline[2] = cross(rotMtxFromSpline[0], rotMtxFromSpline[1]); The problem with this code is when the spline segment becomes perpendicular to (0,0,1)-dir as the orientation switch from one side to the other very easily.
      The approach above is kind of a global approach and I'm thinking if there's a way to append some info to each spline segment to remedy the issue.
      Anyhow I wanted to post this question in case anyone had a similar problem that they solved or maybe anyone know some web resource dealing with this issue?
       
      Thanks!
    • By akshayMore
      Hello,
      I am trying to make a GeometryUtil class that has methods to draw point,line ,polygon etc. I am trying to make a method to draw circle.  
      There are many ways to draw a circle.  I have found two ways, 
      The one way:
      public static void drawBresenhamCircle(PolygonSpriteBatch batch, int centerX, int centerY, int radius, ColorRGBA color) { int x = 0, y = radius; int d = 3 - 2 * radius; while (y >= x) { drawCirclePoints(batch, centerX, centerY, x, y, color); if (d <= 0) { d = d + 4 * x + 6; } else { y--; d = d + 4 * (x - y) + 10; } x++; //drawCirclePoints(batch,centerX,centerY,x,y,color); } } private static void drawCirclePoints(PolygonSpriteBatch batch, int centerX, int centerY, int x, int y, ColorRGBA color) { drawPoint(batch, centerX + x, centerY + y, color); drawPoint(batch, centerX - x, centerY + y, color); drawPoint(batch, centerX + x, centerY - y, color); drawPoint(batch, centerX - x, centerY - y, color); drawPoint(batch, centerX + y, centerY + x, color); drawPoint(batch, centerX - y, centerY + x, color); drawPoint(batch, centerX + y, centerY - x, color); drawPoint(batch, centerX - y, centerY - x, color); } The other way:
      public static void drawCircle(PolygonSpriteBatch target, Vector2 center, float radius, int lineWidth, int segments, int tintColorR, int tintColorG, int tintColorB, int tintColorA) { Vector2[] vertices = new Vector2[segments]; double increment = Math.PI * 2.0 / segments; double theta = 0.0; for (int i = 0; i < segments; i++) { vertices[i] = new Vector2((float) Math.cos(theta) * radius + center.x, (float) Math.sin(theta) * radius + center.y); theta += increment; } drawPolygon(target, vertices, lineWidth, segments, tintColorR, tintColorG, tintColorB, tintColorA); } In the render loop:
      polygonSpriteBatch.begin(); Bitmap.drawBresenhamCircle(polygonSpriteBatch,500,300,200,ColorRGBA.Blue); Bitmap.drawCircle(polygonSpriteBatch,new Vector2(500,300),200,5,50,255,0,0,255); polygonSpriteBatch.end(); I am trying to choose one of them. So I thought that I should go with the one that does not involve heavy calculations and is efficient and faster.  It is said that the use of floating point numbers , trigonometric operations etc. slows down things a bit.  What do you think would be the best method to use?  When I compared the code by observing the time taken by the flow from start of the method to the end, it shows that the second one is faster. (I think I am doing something wrong here ).
      Please help!  
      Thank you.  
    • By ethancodes
      I'm working on an endless wave-based arkanoid/space invaders style hybrid. Bricks spawn above the screen and move down line by line. You must destroy all bricks before they hit the bottom of the screen. There will be multiple types of bricks and random power-up spawns. Currently I am just using a simple Log function that takes in the current wave as a parameter. This works to increase the number of bricks spawned each wave, but I want to find a way to make this much more complicated. Here is a list of everything that should be effected by the increase in difficulty:
      1. Number of bricks
      2. Types of bricks (1 hit bricks, 2 hit bricks, 3 hit bricks, etc.) 
      3. Speed that the bricks move down the screen
      4. How often power-ups spawn
      The biggest problem here is that I can't just increase all of these with each new wave. If I did that, it would quickly become far to difficult. What I would like is an algorithm that gives some amount of variance in the increase between all 4 of these. Say one wave we put 60% of the increase to number of bricks, 20% increase to power-up spawns, 10% to types of bricks and 10% to speed of bricks. But on the next wave those percentages are all moved around and we now have say 105% to work with so the overall difficulty has increased as well. The different types of bricks need to also change to the point where if someone has made it to a certain wave, such as wave 50 for example, there are no longer any 1 hit bricks. We now would have just 2-4 hit bricks, and if they are crazy good and make it all the way to round 100, Now it's just 3-5 hit bricks, etc. 
      If anybody has any good ideas or suggestions on this, I'd appreciate anything you've got! Thanks!
    • By fazook
      Hi, guys!
      I have a rather abstract question, because I don't know which side to approach to its solution. So, I would appreciate any information.
      I have a task to create a simple game that generates floor plans and I following by this perfect algorithm (https://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijcgt/2010/624817/). At the moment I use squarified treemaps (http://www.win.tue.nl/~vanwijk/stm.pdf) and here no problems. I create nested array in which elements are rooms with size. Problems starts when I trying to represent generated "rooms" as edges and vertexes (a, b, c, d steps in attached picture) That representation can give me access to this elements as special "entities" in future game versions.
      I don't have skills in graphs (and do I need graphs?) and at the moment totally stucked at this step. How can I represent room walls as trees (or graphs?) at this step? Calculate size of squares (rooms) and convert sides to a vectors? Then in loop find shared vectors (same position by "x" or "y") and determine them as shared walls? The instinct tells me that there exist more elegant and efficient ways.
      Anyway, thanks for any information about this.

    • By Januario
      Hey guys!,
      So, I'm basically working on an explorer right now.
      It should, as the name suggests, explore the entire thing, the most efficient way possible.
      Your character has vision around you, of, 10x10. The map is much bigger, 100x100. However, it can't just go straight from a corner to another, because: The tiles can be an occupied, or un-occupied one. You can add weights to the tiles, so feel free to use this in your advantage (let's say, adding an extra weight to a visited tile so you can compare visited against non-visited ones). You can use the Pathfinder I'm using, based on the A* algorithm. So, I could be wrong, but by basic logic, I assumed that the "fastest way" to explore the entire thing, is answering the question "What is the nearest tile that I can walk in, that is not occupied and that can reveal as much fog-of-war (unvisited tile) as possible?"...
      My questions are:
      1) Is my question correct? is that really the best way to explore the entire map? 2) If so, what's the best way to know "which is the tile that could reveal the most fog of war"? Once I get the tile that reveals the most fog of war possible, then I just throw the pathfinder to it.
      But I'm having problems doing a good way to achieve that :'( 
      I hope you guys can help me on this one! 
      Thank you
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Algorithm What is the mathematical explanation behind this implementation of simulating eyeballs roll in eyes?

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I want to simulate eyeballs roll in eyes and I have found and forked this implementation in codepen.io. This is exactly what I need.

 

Smart way but I don't understand why it needs to work like this way. Why is it using `ratioX` and `ratioY` which are calculated from dividing `mouseX` and `mouseY` with their sum?  Is there a simpler or even cleverer way to do similar simulation?

Edited by caymanbruce

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I think they are using the x/y ratio as a cheap way to do fake trigonometry. If the mouse is far away from the eyes, they should rotate slower. If the mouse is close to the eyes, it will rotate faster. That would happen naturally with sin/cos. So I think what they have is already pretty simple and clever.

Edited by missionctrl

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