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    • By Court
      Hi there, I am currently studying a diploma of screen and media and want to move on to the bachelor of game animation and design after this course finishes. I was just wondering if there was any advice anyone had on landing job interviews and finding work in general for this field. I was also wondering how hard it is to find a job in this field for females as well?
      many thanks
    • By Alex Daughters
       

      Hi, I am currently a college student studying to become a Game Developer. I need to interview current game developers for a class I'm taking. if anyone seeing this could answer just the 5 questions that I have provided below as well as your name, current position, and how many years you've been in the game industry. I'd really appreciate any responses. 
       
      Name:
      Position:
      Year in the industry:
       
      What was the starting salary?
      How many hours do you work?
      What did you learn outside of school that was useful?
      How did you get your job and how hard was it to find it?
      how was this job different than you expected it to be?
       
      Thank you for your time.
      -Alex Daughters
    • By BenjaminBouchet
      Learning game development in Unreal Engine could be a daunting task for someone who don’t know where to start, and a cumbersome process if you don’t organize your progression correctly. One thing commonly known by experienced developers and by people unfamiliar with coding: mastering a development language is a long and difficult task.
      From blueprints to C++ in Unreal Engine
      If you want to learn fast, you need a good learning strategy. Unreal Engine contains a very powerful tool which you can use to learn C++ faster: its blueprint system. Blueprints are extremely easy to learn (and you may already have a good knowledge of them). Thus you can conveniently use them as a guide for writing code in C++. This is the reason why I am writing a tutorial series on how to make the transition from Unreal Engine blueprints to C++.
      Learn and practice C++
      Following this tutorial, you’ll acquire new concepts of C++ programming in every chapter. Then following chapters will give you reasons to reuse and practice those same concepts. There’s no better way to wire you brain.
      Link to the tutorial: [Tutorial] Learn C++ in Unreal Engine 4 by making a powerful camera
      Please do send me as much feedback as you want. I’ll be considering every constructive remarks and taking them into consideration. Your feedback will help me to improve and update the existing chapters and to make the next one better.

      View full story
    • By BenjaminBouchet
      Learning game development in Unreal Engine could be a daunting task for someone who don’t know where to start, and a cumbersome process if you don’t organize your progression correctly. One thing commonly known by experienced developers and by people unfamiliar with coding: mastering a development language is a long and difficult task.
      From blueprints to C++ in Unreal Engine
      If you want to learn fast, you need a good learning strategy. Unreal Engine contains a very powerful tool which you can use to learn C++ faster: its blueprint system. Blueprints are extremely easy to learn (and you may already have a good knowledge of them). Thus you can conveniently use them as a guide for writing code in C++. This is the reason why I am writing a tutorial series on how to make the transition from Unreal Engine blueprints to C++.
      Learn and practice C++
      Following this tutorial, you’ll acquire new concepts of C++ programming in every chapter. Then following chapters will give you reasons to reuse and practice those same concepts. There’s no better way to wire you brain.
      Link to the tutorial: [Tutorial] Learn C++ in Unreal Engine 4 by making a powerful camera
      Please do send me as much feedback as you want. I’ll be considering every constructive remarks and taking them into consideration. Your feedback will help me to improve and update the existing chapters and to make the next one better.
    • By NaterTots
      I'm looking for people to collaborate with on a (small scoped) project of our choosing.  I'm ideally looking for something that we can publish to an app store in under 6 months and then reassess the situation before deciding on next steps.  I'm not terribly concerned about genre/art/2Dvs3D/platform/etc, I think it's more important to gather a group of like-minded individuals and then make those choices once we understand the skillset of the people involved.  I want to treat this as a learning experience, a way to add another game to our CVs, and potentially as a way to meet people who can continue to collaborate in the future.
      Full Disclosure
      I've tried this in the past (using the similar Reddit forum) and gotten burned every time.  Because of that, I want to make sure that I'm only collaborating with people who will be directly contributing to the product - art/sound/animation/development/etc.  I'm not looking to work with people whose responsibilities are limited to entrepenuer/"idea man"/project management.
      About Me
      By day, I'm a Principal Software Architect at an enterprise software firm.  I've been working in Software Development for around 15 years, mainly focusing on the Microsoft stack - C++, C#, .NET, WPF, databases and most recently with modern architecture (containers, Docker, REST APIs, RabbitMQ, etc etc).  I have many years of Product Ownership, Project Management, and leading a dev team from an idea to a released product, so I can very comfortably "rein in" the scope of work, ensure we're driving towards an MVP, and make sure we're all on the same page about decisions we're making. 
      By night, I'm a hobby Game Developer.  I've been playing with game dev for years (like basically every person who gets into Software Dev) from DirectX 9 through XNA, GameMaker Studio, and the last 5 or so years have been in Unity3D.  Feel free to browse my Github (https://github.com/natertots).  I've "published" a couple very, very basic games by myself.  Here's one: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.NaterTots.Sloth .  Don't get your hopes up.
      Being an architect by profession, I sometimes focus on spending too much time architecting the "perfect" solution to a problem.  Case in point - I've spent the last couple weeks making a Data I/O layer to more easily create data objects that get serialized/deserialized generically from any of a number of locations (locally, web, save location).  I have a strong programming background and feel comfortable implementing most any aspect of a game.
      About You
      A passionate contributor: art/sound/animation/development/etc.  Experience level doesn't matter.  I don't think we should try to enforce hours/time contribution, just as long as we're not stalling and continually making progress, even if it slows at times.
      Someone who's in it to learn and get better.  We're not going to make the next PUBG or WoW.  I don't even want to have the expectation that the focus of this project is to make money.
      A good communicator.  I've had the best experience working with a combination of Slack and Trello.  I'm in the EST time zone and will spend most of my working time around 8pm-midnight, so being available at some point during those times to chat would be a big plus.  
      Willing to work in Unity 3D and (if a dev) program in C#.  Sorry this is a narrow scope, but since I've focused so much effort on ramping up on this platform and language, I would rather not shift away from it.  Note: I'm just looking for people "willing", not necessarily experienced.
       
      I look forward to working with you,
      Nate
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What books would you recommend

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Seems very relevant (the thread title is slightly misleading, some good answers in that thread): 

 

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Many groups and individuals maintain their own book list recommendations. 

For C++, my personal recommendation list (and the reason behind each book) is here.  For other languages, consider looking at web sites and forums dedicated to that language, such as the StackExchange site for whatever language you're considering.

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