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    • By BenjaminBouchet
      Learning game development in Unreal Engine could be a daunting task for someone who don’t know where to start, and a cumbersome process if you don’t organize your progression correctly. One thing commonly known by experienced developers and by people unfamiliar with coding: mastering a development language is a long and difficult task.
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      Learn and practice C++
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Gameplay Issue in using Set Integer(by ref) function in a blueprint in Unreal Engine

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I am trying to set the value of an integer by reference in a macro created in my blueprint script. The macro does a simple conditional check of an integer and increments it if it is less than a max value. I was using one of the maze generating tutorials and the function throws a failed to resolve term Value passed into Target error. I am not sure why it cannot deduce the type of Value. The original tutorial was made in UE 4.6, so could it be due to updates made in UE 4.16? I have attached a screenshot of my blueprint. [not sure if this section might be the correct one since I couldn't find an appropriate section to post this question].

Capture.PNG

Edited by RJSkywalker

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