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    • By Alex Daughters
       

      Hi, I am currently a college student studying to become a Game Developer. I need to interview current game developers for a class I'm taking. if anyone seeing this could answer just the 5 questions that I have provided below as well as your name, current position, and how many years you've been in the game industry. I'd really appreciate any responses. 
       
      Name:
      Position:
      Year in the industry:
       
      What was the starting salary?
      How many hours do you work?
      What did you learn outside of school that was useful?
      How did you get your job and how hard was it to find it?
      how was this job different than you expected it to be?
       
      Thank you for your time.
      -Alex Daughters
    • By ShinGoukiZero
      Hello my name is Jaymie and I am new here so I apologize if this is not the correct place to ask these questions. I have a few questions regarding my education and I feel in order to get the best answers I need to elaborate some on my current situation and background so I apologize if this is long winded. (I have my questions at the bottom of this post if you would rather not read my life story or think it is unnecessary). 
      I am currently going to a community college in Virginia and I am in the process of getting my associate's degree with the intent of transferring to a 4-year school for a bachelor's degree. The school I am looking at is George Mason University and the program I am currently looking at is the BS in Computer Science. I initially was looking into getting their BS in Applied Computer Science with a Concentration in Computer Game Design however I decided to go for the normal CS degree instead due to my decision to get my Minor in Math. (This is due to the fact that the CS degree requires 4 out of the 7 classes that the Minor needs while the ACS degree only has 3 out of 7. ) The reason I decided to go for my Math Minor is due to searching what math is useful or even used in game design on this forum.(One such example here. I also apologize if I am not supposed to post links.) I enjoy math to a certain extent and I personally feel I am pretty good at it. Any game programming related courses that the ACS degree offered are available to the CS degree except for one course so I don't think I really am missing out on anything except for the 3 Art classes that the ACS degree requires. That is when I had the Idea to get a Minor in Art and Visual Technology as well to not only get those 3 courses but 2 additional courses as well. They also have a Minor for Computer Game Design and a Minor for Music Technology which are Minors I think I also would love to get.  This is where my dilemma comes in as a lot of the resources I have been looking at suggest that it is not the best Idea to go for multiple minors or two different types of career paths for my degree(i.e. programming and art). I don't necessarily feel that any of these Minors would be useless in the game design field or that they would hinder me even. I do feel however that 4 Minors is too much and I would probably be better off Double Majoring. I would love to double Major in CS and in Computer Game Design but In all honesty I would rather not be in school 2 or possibly more extra years as I am already kind of late to the game of getting my degree. (I'm 23 so I know I'm not that old but the mistakes I have made in life have led to me getting my education 6 years later than I could have and I would like to produce actual results. Maybe some time after I get a job with my CS degree I'll consider going back for another or even go to a game design school but not right now.) I realize that art and sound design are things that I probably would not encounter at a company being that I am programming focused but I still feel they would be useful skills to have and things I would like to know anyway if I work on things on my own. (Which I intend to do as well as work with others.) As of right now I am leaning in the direction of BS CS with the Math and Art minor due to it more or less being the same curriculum as the ACS just with a few more classes. I believe I am more or less set in stone on the Math Minor and on the BS CS degree, however I am fairly indecisive on taking one of the other 3 Minors and at times I even lean towards the Computer Game Design Minor. Any minor I don't take I intend to learn at least some portion of during my free time. 
      Questions(I realize that I am kind of assuming what I think the answer is with these. I know that answers aren't always yes or no but I am unsure as to how to address my concerns without asking these types of leading questions.) 
      Will employers, be they in the Game Industry or any other field, even care about my Minor or if I have multiple? Will employers write me off as indecisive if I take a Minor or even learn something in my free time that some would say is unrelated to my field? (i.e. Programming and Art or Programming and Music Technology)  As I am getting my CS degree, what are some of your opinions on the Minors I am interested in (Art, Music Technology, Computer Game Design) to compliment my degree.(I am open to opinions on the Math Minor as well however I have decided to commit to getting it unlike with the others where I am still on the fence.) Thank you in advance if you took the time to read this lengthy post or if you answer any of my questions.
      Have a good day,
      Jaymie
    • By kin kita
      Hello GameDev!
      This is an introduction to a new web app: Vitalkia.com. homepage - Vitalkia
       
      Making silly games and sharing them with friends and people online is something that is really special to me. When I was 13-14 I used to hang at various game forums a lot. I didn't really make any amazing games, but that didn't matter. What makes us love making games is sharing it with others and learn. Because of this, as a side project while I study, I've been making a new game creator tool. It lets you create cool games completely in your browser. This app will help you creating games!
      I've recently created a simple interactive tutorial that takes you step by step through creating a platform game:
      Platform tutorial
      This tutorial will teach you how to make a simple platform game and introduce you to the app.
      So far it's still very early in development, but it's very possible to create great looking games, here is an example.
       
       
      More info:
      The app lets you create games anywhere, anytime. Since it's cloud based, it doesn't matter which computer you use. All code and resources gets stored in your own personal web space associated with your account. Your account can be from Google or a new Vitalkia account if you want.
      You don't need to know how to code. The engine allows for direct Javascript coding but also the use of code blocks. The code blocks makes it easy to quickly create something that works.
      After you've created your game you can easily export it. It makes it directly available to everyone with an internet connection!
      There are still many things to do. For example more code blocks needs to be added, and some bug fixes, but I am looking forwards the future of the app and what people will be able to create with it!
       
       
    • By Alex Snyder
      My university class this term is prompting me to ask a few questions, and hopefully you guys could help me out. I'm supposed to crowdsource ideas and techniques on how to "sell" my prototype asset. For context, my prototype is a procedural weapon generator similar to the one used by the Borderlands series.
    • By ilia.glushchenko
      Hello everyone!
      I found my self recently in a dire need of a dedicated game physics discord server. The reason is I would really love being able to talk or chat with people who have some real experience in the field, such as people that I could find here. I really struggled to find one. So I started one myself. If you have any knowledge that you could share or you would like to learn something or just chat, we would be happy to welcome you there.
      https://discord.gg/QF9wVwu
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Learn Game Design and Indie Game Marketing from GameDev.net and CRC Press

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GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a new ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design.

The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game.

The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here.

The Curated Books

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The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell

Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here.

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A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin

Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here.

architecturalapproachtoleveldesign.jpg

An Architectural Approach to Level Design

This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here.

Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here.

Did you know?

GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.


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