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    • By Ricardo3Ddev
      Hi guys!
      This is a independent game being produced by me and my brother. We’ve been working on it for about 6 months and we’ve already done a good part of the game. We hope to finalize and make it available on Steam by the end of this year.
      We are using Blender 3D and Gimp software for production.
       
      About the Game: Dongo Adventure will be a 3D platform style game, where the main character (Dongo) is a mouse that ventures through various scenarios (sewers, culverts, streets, electric grid, etc.) and faces several enemies along the way (cockroaches, mosquitoes, spiders, toxic gases, electrical wires, etc.). He carries a basket / backpack with cheeses that he uses to throw and defend himself from enemies, as well as being able to push objects that helps him to overcome obstacles. The ultimate goal will be a surprise!
       
      Now we are developing new scenarios and enemies. We hope to publish news soon...
      Game page on Steam: http://store.steampowered.com/app/811450/Dongo_Adventure/ - (Teaser UPDATED)
      Dongo Adventure - Indie Game Project (First Teaser) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2nmxtkE0xk
       
      Thanks for following the project!

    • By iradicator
      This is a general question about player controller on a surface that contains geometry (curved roads / slopes, mountains, etc.) and obstacles (walls). The game should simulate a simple physical model (acceleration, collisions, etc.) and the character should navigate convincingly through the terrain. 

      I'm using Unity but I think this is a general question about how to design a character controller.

      I wrote a simple character controller that uses player input to steer the character in the world. wasd keys move forward and turn. Since I'm controlling the character directly, I'm using a kinematic object (I don't even use the rigidbody) and moves it by setting the transform directly to some model I implemented (I have speed, acceleration, mass, etc.)

      Why did I wrote a physical kinematic simulation? I tried to use a rigidbody and apply forces based on player's input directly on it but I found the control felt a little bit "swimmy" and it was hard to tweak (example: the character slammed hard and spun out of control (even when locking xz rotating direction), it took a long time to accelerate, etc.)

      That worked well when during prototyping on a simple plane with no obstacles. Now I have a level with non-even geometry. The problem I have is how to make the players "stick" to the ground when they travel around (Prototype applies movement on the xz plane but doesn't take into account being connected to the floor). Another issue is to set the orientation (up vector) of the player (imagine a vehicle) in a way that looks both smooth and convincing - the vehicle should change its pitch / roll as it's navigating through some slopes. Even the simple example of a  vehicle starting to climb from a plane on a road with a constant slop (say 20 deg) should change the orientation in a convincing manner, i.e. the vehicle should not start to "lift the nose" before touching the ramp, nor should it "sink the nose" colliding into the ramp. Again, this is where the physical engine can come in handy, but when I tried to apply force going up the vehicle slowed down because of friction.

      I also have problems with collisions since I'm moving the character directly by controlling its transform (kinematic), it feels weird and doesn't play well when the physics engine detects collisions and doesn't want to let the character penetrate a wall. It collides well with objects, it just feel very not natural.

      The real questions here are about best approaches to design a character controller (note: that SHOULD be applied also to agents using AI steering algorithms - that also calculates forces or running a model underneath). 

      1. How do you move a character? Are you using the physics engine to do the heavy lifting or you control the character directly like a kinematic object?
      2. If you're using physics, what's the best approach to apply forces? (yes, it depends on the game, but let's say some realistic based physics model with accelerations and forces - let's assume animations don't apply root motion - to simplify) In Unity, there are multiple ways to apply force - relative / non-relative, impulse / continuous etc.
      3, If you're not using physics, how do you make sure that collision detection play nice with your movement algorithms? How do you make collisions look natural and still give the player good control?
      4. Uneven terrain, how do you make the character (let's assume a vehicle - a car - with no complex animations (so no IK in play)) "stick" to the ground while changing its orientation (up vector) in a smooth and convincing manner?
      5. what's the best way to also allow the player to disconnect from the ground? (e.g. either jump or fall off platforms)

      For me, rigidbody vs. kinematic is the key question here. I saw tutorials that use both - but since they were super simple they didn't deal with the problems I mentioned above in depth. I'm wondering what's the best approach for the player controller and would love to hear more points to consider and tips based on your experience. Pseudo code / code samples (in any language / engine) would be much appreciated. Thank you!
    • By Court
      Hi there, I am currently studying a diploma of screen and media and want to move on to the bachelor of game animation and design after this course finishes. I was just wondering if there was any advice anyone had on landing job interviews and finding work in general for this field. I was also wondering how hard it is to find a job in this field for females as well?
      many thanks
    • By Alex Daughters
       

      Hi, I am currently a college student studying to become a Game Developer. I need to interview current game developers for a class I'm taking. if anyone seeing this could answer just the 5 questions that I have provided below as well as your name, current position, and how many years you've been in the game industry. I'd really appreciate any responses. 
       
      Name:
      Position:
      Year in the industry:
       
      What was the starting salary?
      How many hours do you work?
      What did you learn outside of school that was useful?
      How did you get your job and how hard was it to find it?
      how was this job different than you expected it to be?
       
      Thank you for your time.
      -Alex Daughters
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On Tuesday 25th July from 5:45pm, the Sydney Game Engine Developers will be holding their next Meetup in Ultimo. This month guest speakers Aidan Millott and Paulina Morrison Fell are joining forces to give a talk on Producing an Internal Engine.

Producing engine technology that's shared across 10+ productions is no easy feat. Managing conflicting priorities from multiple games and coordinating shared development of features is only just a flavour of how challenging it can be. In this presentation, Aidan and Paulina share their experiences and techniques used to manage the distributed development of internal projects.

Aidan Millott is an Area Product Owner at Wargaming.net, where he works with internal stakeholders to improve BigWorld, focusing on development of games by small teams. Prior to this, he was an Executive Producer and Studio Manager at Halfbrick studios, where he released 11 games on several platforms.

Paulina Morrison Fell works at Wargaming.net as a Senior Project Manager. She works with the Client Engine team to manage the development of features for game productions, liaising with stakeholders from multiple studios. She has worked in a number of successful startups and bigger companies like Disney, where she has helped launch over 10 games for small platforms.

Agenda for the night is:

  •  5:45pm - Arrive and network (pizza and drinks provided)
  • 6:15pm - Presentation by Aidan and Paulina
  • 7:15pm - Network/Closing

There are still spots available and we would love for you to join us for this interesting talk.

RSVP and come along!

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