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    • By fleissi
      Hey guys!

      I'm new here and I recently started developing my own rendering engine. It's open source, based on OpenGL/DirectX and C++.
      The full source code is hosted on github:
      https://github.com/fleissna/flyEngine

      I would appreciate if people with experience in game development / engine desgin could take a look at my source code. I'm looking for honest, constructive criticism on how to improve the engine.
      I'm currently writing my master's thesis in computer science and in the recent year I've gone through all the basics about graphics programming, learned DirectX and OpenGL, read some articles on Nvidia GPU Gems, read books and integrated some of this stuff step by step into the engine.

      I know about the basics, but I feel like there is some missing link that I didn't get yet to merge all those little pieces together.

      Features I have so far:
      - Dynamic shader generation based on material properties
      - Dynamic sorting of meshes to be renderd based on shader and material
      - Rendering large amounts of static meshes
      - Hierarchical culling (detail + view frustum)
      - Limited support for dynamic (i.e. moving) meshes
      - Normal, Parallax and Relief Mapping implementations
      - Wind animations based on vertex displacement
      - A very basic integration of the Bullet physics engine
      - Procedural Grass generation
      - Some post processing effects (Depth of Field, Light Volumes, Screen Space Reflections, God Rays)
      - Caching mechanisms for textures, shaders, materials and meshes

      Features I would like to have:
      - Global illumination methods
      - Scalable physics
      - Occlusion culling
      - A nice procedural terrain generator
      - Scripting
      - Level Editing
      - Sound system
      - Optimization techniques

      Books I have so far:
      - Real-Time Rendering Third Edition
      - 3D Game Programming with DirectX 11
      - Vulkan Cookbook (not started yet)

      I hope you guys can take a look at my source code and if you're really motivated, feel free to contribute :-)
      There are some videos on youtube that demonstrate some of the features:
      Procedural grass on the GPU
      Procedural Terrain Engine
      Quadtree detail and view frustum culling

      The long term goal is to turn this into a commercial game engine. I'm aware that this is a very ambitious goal, but I'm sure it's possible if you work hard for it.

      Bye,

      Phil
    • By tj8146
      I have attached my project in a .zip file if you wish to run it for yourself.
      I am making a simple 2d top-down game and I am trying to run my code to see if my window creation is working and to see if my timer is also working with it. Every time I run it though I get errors. And when I fix those errors, more come, then the same errors keep appearing. I end up just going round in circles.  Is there anyone who could help with this? 
       
      Errors when I build my code:
      1>Renderer.cpp 1>c:\users\documents\opengl\game\game\renderer.h(15): error C2039: 'string': is not a member of 'std' 1>c:\program files (x86)\windows kits\10\include\10.0.16299.0\ucrt\stddef.h(18): note: see declaration of 'std' 1>c:\users\documents\opengl\game\game\renderer.h(15): error C2061: syntax error: identifier 'string' 1>c:\users\documents\opengl\game\game\renderer.cpp(28): error C2511: 'bool Game::Rendering::initialize(int,int,bool,std::string)': overloaded member function not found in 'Game::Rendering' 1>c:\users\documents\opengl\game\game\renderer.h(9): note: see declaration of 'Game::Rendering' 1>c:\users\documents\opengl\game\game\renderer.cpp(35): error C2597: illegal reference to non-static member 'Game::Rendering::window' 1>c:\users\documents\opengl\game\game\renderer.cpp(36): error C2597: illegal reference to non-static member 'Game::Rendering::window' 1>c:\users\documents\opengl\game\game\renderer.cpp(43): error C2597: illegal reference to non-static member 'Game::Rendering::window' 1>Done building project "Game.vcxproj" -- FAILED. ========== Build: 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========  
       
      Renderer.cpp
      #include <GL/glew.h> #include <GLFW/glfw3.h> #include "Renderer.h" #include "Timer.h" #include <iostream> namespace Game { GLFWwindow* window; /* Initialize the library */ Rendering::Rendering() { mClock = new Clock; } Rendering::~Rendering() { shutdown(); } bool Rendering::initialize(uint width, uint height, bool fullscreen, std::string window_title) { if (!glfwInit()) { return -1; } /* Create a windowed mode window and its OpenGL context */ window = glfwCreateWindow(640, 480, "Hello World", NULL, NULL); if (!window) { glfwTerminate(); return -1; } /* Make the window's context current */ glfwMakeContextCurrent(window); glViewport(0, 0, (GLsizei)width, (GLsizei)height); glOrtho(0, (GLsizei)width, (GLsizei)height, 0, 1, -1); glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION); glLoadIdentity(); glfwSwapInterval(1); glEnable(GL_SMOOTH); glEnable(GL_DEPTH_TEST); glEnable(GL_BLEND); glDepthFunc(GL_LEQUAL); glHint(GL_PERSPECTIVE_CORRECTION_HINT, GL_NICEST); glEnable(GL_TEXTURE_2D); glLoadIdentity(); return true; } bool Rendering::render() { /* Loop until the user closes the window */ if (!glfwWindowShouldClose(window)) return false; /* Render here */ mClock->reset(); glfwPollEvents(); if (mClock->step()) { glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT); glfwSwapBuffers(window); mClock->update(); } return true; } void Rendering::shutdown() { glfwDestroyWindow(window); glfwTerminate(); } GLFWwindow* Rendering::getCurrentWindow() { return window; } } Renderer.h
      #pragma once namespace Game { class Clock; class Rendering { public: Rendering(); ~Rendering(); bool initialize(uint width, uint height, bool fullscreen, std::string window_title = "Rendering window"); void shutdown(); bool render(); GLFWwindow* getCurrentWindow(); private: GLFWwindow * window; Clock* mClock; }; } Timer.cpp
      #include <GL/glew.h> #include <GLFW/glfw3.h> #include <time.h> #include "Timer.h" namespace Game { Clock::Clock() : mTicksPerSecond(50), mSkipTics(1000 / mTicksPerSecond), mMaxFrameSkip(10), mLoops(0) { mLastTick = tick(); } Clock::~Clock() { } bool Clock::step() { if (tick() > mLastTick && mLoops < mMaxFrameSkip) return true; return false; } void Clock::reset() { mLoops = 0; } void Clock::update() { mLastTick += mSkipTics; mLoops++; } clock_t Clock::tick() { return clock(); } } TImer.h
      #pragma once #include "Common.h" namespace Game { class Clock { public: Clock(); ~Clock(); void update(); bool step(); void reset(); clock_t tick(); private: uint mTicksPerSecond; ufloat mSkipTics; uint mMaxFrameSkip; uint mLoops; uint mLastTick; }; } Common.h
      #pragma once #include <cstdio> #include <cstdlib> #include <ctime> #include <cstring> #include <cmath> #include <iostream> namespace Game { typedef unsigned char uchar; typedef unsigned short ushort; typedef unsigned int uint; typedef unsigned long ulong; typedef float ufloat; }  
      Game.zip
    • By Ty Typhoon
      Before read everything i am honest:
      Payment after release you get your percentage lifetime for that project.
       
      Second:
      i dont need your inspirations, ideas, music or designs.
      My head is full with that.
      I need workers who i can trust.
       
       
       
      Please let us talk in discord.
      I got a lot of stuff planned, there is much work to do.
       
      But first my team and me try to start with a small mini game and we need maybe exactly you.
      Planned for more than pc, like ps4, xbox one and mobile - so its very important to us to hopefully welcome a programmer.
       
      The mini game will be part of the planned big game. There will be never before seen guns and gameplay, you will get deeper info if youre a safe part of the team.
       
      I need:
      Programmers
      Animators
      Zbrush pros
       
      Join here please:
      https://discord.gg/YtjE3sV
       
      You find me here:
      Joerg Federmann Composing#2898
       
       
    • By Steamie Tilted
      Hi guys,
      I just released my first game and would like to know if anyone wants to test it. This is the first attempt to produce a game. A total new world for me.
      The link to test is here. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.steamiegames.beatem
       
      I hope you like and have fun. Any feedback will be appreciated.
       
      Kind regards,
       
       
      Steamie & Tilted
       
       
    • By fazook
      Hi, guys!
      I have a rather abstract question, because I don't know which side to approach to its solution. So, I would appreciate any information.
      I have a task to create a simple game that generates floor plans and I following by this perfect algorithm (https://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijcgt/2010/624817/). At the moment I use squarified treemaps (http://www.win.tue.nl/~vanwijk/stm.pdf) and here no problems. I create nested array in which elements are rooms with size. Problems starts when I trying to represent generated "rooms" as edges and vertexes (a, b, c, d steps in attached picture) That representation can give me access to this elements as special "entities" in future game versions.
      I don't have skills in graphs (and do I need graphs?) and at the moment totally stucked at this step. How can I represent room walls as trees (or graphs?) at this step? Calculate size of squares (rooms) and convert sides to a vectors? Then in loop find shared vectors (same position by "x" or "y") and determine them as shared walls? The instinct tells me that there exist more elegant and efficient ways.
      Anyway, thanks for any information about this.

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C++ How to fix this timestep once and for all?

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One of the biggest reasons why I haven't released my game is because of this annoying timestep issue I have.  To be frank, this game was poorly planned, poorly coded, and was originally written as a small tech demo and a mini-game.  Now it has evolved into a fully featured (and very messy code base of a) game.  If you thought Lugaru was bad, Looptil is far worse!  So what happens is that the delta is not really consistent.  Sometimes enemies don't spawn fast enough because the delta isn't even consistent at 60fps, which is a big reason why the game is broken.

static uint64_t last_time = 0;
uint64_t current_time = time_get_time(); //( get_current_time() * 1000.0f );

int fps_limit = 60;
float frame_time = float( current_time - last_time );

if( last_time != 0 )
	This->m_delta_speed = frame_time / ( 1000.0f / 60.0f );

And this is my timing function:

uint64_t time_get_time()
{
#ifdef _WINRT
	return GetTickCount64();
#endif
	
#if __ANDROID__	/* TODO: Fix std::chrono for Android NDK */
	uint64_t ms = 0;
	timeval tv;

	gettimeofday( &tv, NULL );

	ms = tv.tv_sec * 1000;
	ms += tv.tv_usec / 1000;

	return ms;
#else
	std::chrono::system_clock::time_point now = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
    std::chrono::system_clock::duration tp = now.time_since_epoch();
	std::chrono::milliseconds ms = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(tp);
	return (uint64_t) ms.count();
#endif
}

Now I know some of you will cringe when you see GetTickCount64(), but that's the only function that gives me reliable results on Windows 10 (UWP) ports, so that's staying. 

One more thing to note here, my game has a badly written game loop.  It uses a switch statement, followed by draw_game_mode(), update_game_mode(), so I kinda screwed myself there.  I tried changing it, but it broke the game completely, so I left it in it's messy state.  Is it possible to simply just have a proper delta calculation function?  Because it's adjusting itself based on the current frame time.  This may not be the best of ideas, but it was something I whipped up because I needed to have this run okay when it goes down to 30fps without running half the speed.  This works in general, but it's innacurate and causes problems.

Any ideas?  Thanks.

Shogun

EDIT: Feel free to ask anything in case I missed a vital detail.  My lunch break is ending and it's time for me to go.  Thanks.

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Although I see that link shared alot, it actually made my timing issues worse for this particular game.  In the future, I'll be sure to follow that guide to avoid future headaches.

Also, I fixed the problem.  Instead of using frame times, I used my game's actual frame rate divided by 1000.  Now it works perfectly (so far).  L. Spiro is going to kill me if he reads this, but I just want this game to work!

Thanks.

Shogun

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Frame rate = Frames Per Second by most usual definitions. Or, Frames Per 1000 Milliseconds, if you will.

If your framerate is N frames per second, then it is also true that your framerate is N/1000 frames per millisecond. Frame time is milliseconds per frame, or seconds per frame / 1000.

It sounds like you just have a units/order-of-magnitude mixup in the original code, and your 1000 is adjusting for it.

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On 7/30/2017 at 11:43 PM, blueshogun96 said:

Although I see that link shared alot, it actually made my timing issues worse for this particular game.  In the future, I'll be sure to follow that guide to avoid future headaches.

Also, I fixed the problem.  Instead of using frame times, I used my game's actual frame rate divided by 1000.  Now it works perfectly (so far).  L. Spiro is going to kill me if he reads this, but I just want this game to work!

Thanks.

Shogun

You.

Dirty.

RAT!!

You didn’t make the game work, you just hid the problem under a rug.  It will work differently on various devices so I am not sure how this helps you release anything.

You don’t show the whole game loop.  What is This->m_delta_speed?
Are you accumulating time from 0 = launch of game?  Why the conversion to float?


L. Spiro

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On 30/07/2017 at 6:40 AM, blueshogun96 said:

 


static uint64_t last_time = 0;
uint64_t current_time = time_get_time(); //( get_current_time() * 1000.0f );

int fps_limit = 60;
float frame_time = float( current_time - last_time );

if( last_time != 0 )
	This->m_delta_speed = frame_time / ( 1000.0f / 60.0f );

 

Is that the real algorithm? You never update last_time in that algorithm.

On 30/07/2017 at 6:40 AM, blueshogun96 said:

Now I know some of you will cringe when you see GetTickCount64(), but that's the only function that gives me reliable results on Windows 10 (UWP) ports, so that's staying. 

 

Every Win10/UWP device supports the QueryPerformanceCounter/Frequency API - the normal way to do precision timing.

Milliseconds are shitty for game timing. If your loop frequency is 60Hz, then a millisecond timer is accurate to +/- 6%... What's worse is that GetTickCount64 says that it typically has 10-16ms accuracy (+/-60% to 96% error) :(

On 31/07/2017 at 4:43 PM, blueshogun96 said:

Also, I fixed the problem.  Instead of using frame times, I used my game's actual frame rate divided by 1000.  Now it works perfectly (so far).  L. Spiro is going to kill me if he reads this, but I just want this game to work!

 

Maybe you've got code that just happens to output a small value every frame, which is not actually a measurement of delta time, but happens to simply be some arbitrary number that's small enough to act as a plausible fixed timestep value.

e.g. if you simply hardcode an arbitrary delta, such as "m_delta_speed = 0.06f;" do you get similar results?

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On 8/4/2017 at 4:41 AM, L. Spiro said:

You.

Dirty.

RAT!!

You didn’t make the game work, you just hid the problem under a rug.  It will work differently on various devices so I am not sure how this helps you release anything.

You don’t show the whole game loop.  What is This->m_delta_speed?
Are you accumulating time from 0 = launch of game?  Why the conversion to float?


L. Spiro

Yes, now I am finding the flaws as they surface.  Sometimes after coming out of the background or a suspended state, the FPS calculation will spew a really high number and cause the game to move rapidly for one second, then go back to normal.  This will result in death many times for the user.  So yes, I dun f@#%ed up even more.

The entire gameloop is too large and is a complete mess (I'll never code a game this way ever again).  The delta_speed variable is a percentage that is multiplied against the entity's speed value so that it moves at an adjusted speed based on frame rates.  I am not accumulating time as I did not plan this thing ahead or even consider the need for time based movement when I originally wrote it.  Then when primitive counts started reaching the millions, frame rates dropped and then I realize "I dun screwed up".

 

On 8/4/2017 at 7:30 AM, Hodgman said:

Is that the real algorithm? You never update last_time in that algorithm.

Every Win10/UWP device supports the QueryPerformanceCounter/Frequency API - the normal way to do precision timing.

Milliseconds are shitty for game timing. If your loop frequency is 60Hz, then a millisecond timer is accurate to +/- 6%... What's worse is that GetTickCount64 says that it typically has 10-16ms accuracy (+/-60% to 96% error) :(

Maybe you've got code that just happens to output a small value every frame, which is not actually a measurement of delta time, but happens to simply be some arbitrary number that's small enough to act as a plausible fixed timestep value.

e.g. if you simply hardcode an arbitrary delta, such as "m_delta_speed = 0.06f;" do you get similar results?

The loop is updated further down.  I forgot to add that.

If milisecond timing is a bad design choice, then I will do a way with it pronto.  I wasn't aware of the poor accuracy, and if the margin of error is that great, then I'll most definitely stop using it.  I wrote that half arsed timing function out of laziness.  Speaking of high resolution timers, I'll need one that's portable to all three major OSes.  Which I did find here: http://roxlu.com/2014/047/high-resolution-timer-function-in-c-c--

/* ----------------------------------------------------------------------- */
/*
  Easy embeddable cross-platform high resolution timer function. For each 
  platform we select the high resolution timer. You can call the 'ns()' 
  function in your file after embedding this. 
*/
#include <stdint.h>
#if defined(__linux)
#  define HAVE_POSIX_TIMER
#  include <time.h>
#  ifdef CLOCK_MONOTONIC
#     define CLOCKID CLOCK_MONOTONIC
#  else
#     define CLOCKID CLOCK_REALTIME
#  endif
#elif defined(__APPLE__)
#  define HAVE_MACH_TIMER
#  include <mach/mach_time.h>
#elif defined(_WIN32)
#  define WIN32_LEAN_AND_MEAN
#  include <windows.h>
#endif
static uint64_t ns() {
  static uint64_t is_init = 0;
#if defined(__APPLE__)
    static mach_timebase_info_data_t info;
    if (0 == is_init) {
      mach_timebase_info(&info);
      is_init = 1;
    }
    uint64_t now;
    now = mach_absolute_time();
    now *= info.numer;
    now /= info.denom;
    return now;
#elif defined(__linux)
    static struct timespec linux_rate;
    if (0 == is_init) {
      clock_getres(CLOCKID, &linux_rate);
      is_init = 1;
    }
    uint64_t now;
    struct timespec spec;
    clock_gettime(CLOCKID, &spec);
    now = spec.tv_sec * 1.0e9 + spec.tv_nsec;
    return now;
#elif defined(_WIN32)
    static LARGE_INTEGER win_frequency;
    if (0 == is_init) {
      QueryPerformanceFrequency(&win_frequency);
      is_init = 1;
    }
    LARGE_INTEGER now;
    QueryPerformanceCounter(&now);
    return (uint64_t) ((1e9 * now.QuadPart)  / win_frequency.QuadPart);
#endif
}
/* ----------------------------------------------------------------------- */

Since this game is cross platform, it has to work on everything.  If nano seconds are the way to go, then I'll use that instead.

And yes, using the frame rate isn't really a reliable way to do this (it blew up in my face).  I found that using a fixed value will give me consistent results.  A fixed delta doesn't generate any issues for me. 

Shogun

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As a side note, in case it helps you (on some future project I guess): bullet (the physics API) ticked at constant rate, but it still allowed for frame-specific updates. OFC it only interpolated those between two known states. So it's has both predictable behavior and hi-frame-rate-butter-smooth goodness; apparently nobody noticed it's a tick late.

I tried something similar in an TD game I tried years ago I don't think you remember: the implication is that you have to correct for inconsistencies as an enemy spawned at 0.5 tick still has to be half-a-tick evolved and cannot be backwards interpolated at 0.3 ticks. Since the game wanted to be deterministic in nature I couldn't let players the chance to get different patterns due to hardware power. Ew! Hopefully you don't need this detail!

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On 10/08/2017 at 10:56 AM, blueshogun96 said:

  I found that using a fixed value will give me consistent results.  A fixed delta doesn't generate any issues for me. 

;(

Try it in a PC with a 144Hz monitor now..

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'Easy' fix: run your physics with a 720 Hz timestep. Iterate it 5 times per frame for 144Hz monitors/vsync, 12 times for a 60Hz monitor, and 24 times for a 30Hz monitor. No interpolation needed!

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