Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Writersface13

Level Designer Portfolio

This topic is 383 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hello again all! I've decided that I'm most interested in pursuing a career in the level designing aspect of gaming (mostly because I love working with the editor and feel comfortable with it). My question is: what does a portfolio for a level designer look like? Should I have large, open worlds? Condensed, narrow hallways that highlight movement through a level? So-well-built-that-they-almost-look-like-the-real-thing models of actual places? Two dozen or so diagrams? I just finished a corridor sort of level in UE4 and am wondering where I should go next? Thank you all for reading!

P.S. I apologize for posting this in the Articles and Tutorials Section. I haven't been on in a while and forgot how to post. Thank you to those who understand!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

 In an ideal world you'd just need to demonstrate your ability to create a fun map in whatever genre you're planning on working on, but in reality the better looking your levels the more they'll be noticed so take the time to make them look as good as possible. You only have one chance to impress.

  If I were looking at your portfolio as an FPS designer, I'd want to see interesting spaces that have a lot of potential to work well with our core gameplay loop - if you're applying for a FPS position then submit clear, easily decipherable shots of several types of map, arenas, open spaces etc. If your basic composition skills are good and your scenes look interesting then that's a huge plus. Top points if you can turn a piece of concept art or an interesting photograph into a great game space. If you can kitbash an old modular set into something fresh, awesome.

 You don't need to be able to make shippable art but you need to be able to create a base that doesn't require the art team to spend long hours reverse engineering your greybox into a workable space.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!