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Writersface13

Engine Switch

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Hello everyone! So, I've been using UE4 for about two weeks or so and have had multiple crashes on it. I'm getting incredibly frustrated. I feel like I need to switch to a different engine at this point and make some 2D platformers since I have such a passion for them (and said that was what I would start off with). Problem is, I want to learn how to make 3D games because that's the only kind that will get me a job in the industry. Am I right to be fearful? Should I try a different 3D engine? Is working on 2D games a bad thing? Please let me know as soon as possible so I can get back to work. Thanks!

(In case anyone is wondering, I have a macbook pro so... yeah, kinda have a good idea about what the crashes are about. Any engines that work great for macs please inform me.)

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I'm new to the forums, but I'll give my opinion anyway.

I don't know what your level of experience is, but I would say whether you start with 3D, or 2D won't matter in the long run except 2D is probably much easier to start with. I haven't used UE4 much but if you want another engine that can do both 2D and 3D I would suggest trying Unity. It should work well for a 2D platformer,and you can do 3D later if you like. If you only want to do 2D, maybe have a look at game maker or some other 2D specific engine, but Unity will work.

You could obviously go for a lower level framework, but since it sounds like you started out with UE4 and I don't know what your experience in programming is, I would say try a fully featured engine first.

Also, start very simple (and I mean, VERY simple) if you haven't done anything before, and don't worry about 2D vs. 3D right now.

It's way to easy to start something only to find oth that you don't like it a month later, or realize that you've taken a bad approach and have to redo a lot of stuff anyway.

Hope this helps.

 

 

 

 

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I really do want to make a 2D platformer, but the whole 2D vs 3D thing is what pushed me to Unreal. In terms of experience, UE4 is my first one, so not a whole lot. I've heard Cocos2D is good, but am still stressing about the whole switch thing.

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Go for 2D if that's what you want. You'll most likely switch engine, library and/or programming language multiple times anyway, and you'll learn from everything you do. 

No experience with Cocos 2D.

If you try a new engine, you'll find some things are very similar. The same concepts apply no matter what you use. You just do some things in a different way.

If you've been using the blueprint system in UE4 ( I don't remember what it's called). Unity has nothing like that build in right now (even though I think there is some add ons available), so you'll have to use either C# or JavaScript. Cocos2D has support for quite a few languages if I remember correctly, but if you have no experience in programmer, it's probably more difficult to get started with then something like Unity or Game maker.

If you want to do everything in code, you have lots of frameworks and libraries to chose from depending on what language you want :)

 

 

 

 

 

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Another problem is that I have no way to create my own assets and don't want to spend all the money the marketplace requires which will make it really hard for me to string together a portfolio.

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Considering your circumstance, I honestly recommend Unity for you.  It can handle what you want, and by many is considered easier to use than UE4.  Also, it has origins on Mac(in fact wasn't available on Windows for the first few versions), so I have it understood that the Mac version should also be quite stable.

 

Also, if you are sure that you will be interested in 3d stuff later, I see nothing wrong with using a "3d oriented" engine for your 2d platformer games.  It will ease you into the software, and make the transition easier than if you used a "2d only" engine and had to switch later(doable, just takes a bit more time).

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If you truly are interested in 2D games I would go for it.  2D is a far from dead.  Look on facebook, android, IOS.  2D games are a viable career path and for a solo indie developer maybe a more attractive path than 3D.  

 

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There's also the problem of not being able to make my own assets. Stencyl has had my eye for the last two days because of it's ease into programming and large amount of assets. I know you have to buy assets off the Unity store, but I can't do that right now (I did just buy a macbook pro recently after all). Does it come with enough assets for me to make unique levels, or do you know of a good place to where I can get free ones?

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Unity3D has a ton of free material that you can use to create games.

https://www.assetstore.unity3d.com/en/#!/search/page=1/sortby=popularity/query=category:0&price:0-0

This is a list of 1300 free 3D model packs that Unity3D offers in its assets store.  There are also scripts for game behaviors, shaders, textures, you name it they have it and its free.  You can learn and work with these until you have the confidence to invest your money in your ability.  

Be a Man with a Plan.  Please not this will take time, but at the end of this process you will feel duly and truly prepared to take on your task.  You will not be an expert by any means but you will have the tools the begin creating your vision!

Step 1.

Learn the unity interface

Complete the first 10 tutorials in the link above.

Step 2.

Introduce Yourself.

Unity3D's greatest strength is its community.  Make it your strength as well.

Step 3. 

Learn to express yourself

C# is the scripting language of choice and microsoft will teach you basics for free.

Step 4.

Build under direction of a master.

Check out the Unity3D project tutorials.  Don't just skip to the kind of game you want to make.  These tutorials give you an idea of what the engine is capable of in different applications and help you develop technical skills with the engine.  

Step 5.

Don't stop when the tutorial ends.

 Tweak the games and change them as much as you are capable.  BREAK THEM and then repair them.  Have fun with them!

Step 6.

Identify your strengths as a developer and run with them.

Supplement the rest with tutorials by now you should have an idea of what you need.  Keep learning and keep building.  DO NOT SWITCH ENGINES.  DO NOT SWITCH LANGUAGES.  Plow forward with the strong base you have and BUILD.

Good luck man.  I hope you decide to start learning Unity3D today!

-PowerMan

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