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Robert Miroshnichenko

Fur and Dress

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Hi there guys! 

Recently I found an interview with cool 3d modeler where I was very attracted by the Fur on dress that I was looking for my snow knight (like in the Game of Thrones)
download?id=Jr5QKKHN9xaa1fJgGurOXEDNjy8Z
Somebody maybe knows how to make a fur for a dress?
Searched on the forums, youtube, but the fur is obtained both from the clay

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These days fur is generally made in shaders.  More advanced systems will run some combination of physics code with data passed to the shaders.

Search for terms like "GPU fur shader", or if you've got an engine like Unity or Unreal, add those to the search terms.

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On 17/08/2017 at 10:50 PM, frob said:

These days fur is generally made in shaders.  More advanced systems will run some combination of physics code with data passed to the shaders.

Search for terms like "GPU fur shader", or if you've got an engine like Unity or Unreal, add those to the search terms.

thank you!

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Like this? (video below, skip at 0:05)

That's HairFarm, a plugin for 3ds max

Though I don't think this is a real-time solution. Still useful for real-time for rendering hair or fur textures with good alphas and make a lot of different hair/fur planes, than maybe you can randomly distribute planes on a 3d mesh with some algorithm, maybe painting the distribution weight on the vertex color? Or stuff like that :P

 

Edited by MarcusAseth

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The fur looks like it was done with a particle effect. I don't really know how to do that myself, but there are tutorials for it. The part of the dress without fur was most likely either modeled and/or sculpted.

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The fur in render engines are normally done with particles. It isn't the kind of thing you can do 60 times a second and still have room for a game.

There are fur shaders for games, they aren't this good however when used well they can produce good results.

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I was referring to make it in a 3D modeling/sculpting application. Blender has a particle effect system, that can be used to generate hair, and fur, and other things for rendering. I was assuming that was what he was asking about.

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16 hours ago, Yxjmir said:

I was referring to make it in a 3D modeling/sculpting application.

Yes, I wasn't implying your answer is wrong. I was just pointing out that if the character is meant for a game, this approach wouldn't work.You are correct in saying that in a render engine like Blender and Max fur would be done using particles.

edit: And if you are making the high poly in the old Blender you would have to use the hair particle emitter with a mesh. However the new Blender(2.79) has a addon that allows for easier mesh fill.

 

Render engines often take minutes per image and some times days to render it. A game has to render 24-60 frames each second to look convincing. So in games we can't use the particle system to render fur for one piece of armour, because it would eat up all the resources needed for more important things like grass.

Shaders are used instead, the common fur shader often copies the mesh and scales it while narrowing down the visible pixels on the texture. A layered mesh approach. Also the velvet is just a BPR shader, it just scatters the light and isn't anything fancy in terms of PBR.

Particles are used for hair in games, as characters are often the most important object, however the average players PC would struggle to render even at 1fps if you used it for fur.

 

If you look at the fur you will see they are sharp, pointing outwards. If they are particles then thy are being used in the most inefficient way possible. Particles have almost the same cost when curved, between 1-3 times.

However the nature of the fur is correct for a fur shader. As is explained here: http://www.xbdev.net/directx3dx/specialX/Fur/

fur_details.jpg

Edited by Scouting Ninja

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I only saw after I had posted the first time that there was a duplicate topic by the same person in beginners forum, and that he reply to it. So, I think he was asking about shaders, anyway.

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