KingdomFighter74

Beginner in need of guidance

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Recently, I've come to realize that I'd much like to make games as well as play them. Problem is, I have no idea where to start. I just want to start off with a basic 2D platformer, but am unsure of what engine to use. I don't have the tools to create my own art (nor do I have the desire to), and just want an engine that has pre-made assets, a ton of free assets or tools to create your own inside the engine. I've heard GameMaker is really good, but want to know about how getting or making assets would work. Another problem is that I don't know what I would want to specialize in. Programming, design, audio; I'm just not sure so I don't know what I should start with. If anyone can help me find a base to start off with, I'd appreciate it. Thanks!

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15 minutes ago, KingdomFighter74 said:

Another problem is that I don't know what I would want to specialize in.

We can't tell you what you will like doing.

Download GameMaker and test it. Look at some simple tutorials to begin with, then try something (very simple!) to begin with. Then either continue doing that, or maybe have a look at Unity and/or Unreal. If you get stuck with something, ask for help. If you realize x is really awesome and you would like to learn more about it, ask more specific questions or ask for references to learn more on your own.

Best of luck =)

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35 minutes ago, Tom Sloper said:

Why not just jump into GameMaker and see where it takes you?

I just don't want to get into the engine and realize that it's blank and I have to create my characters or environments in a separate program. I know there is a sprite editor in GameMaker for characters, but I haven't found anything that suggests that environments can be done the same way.

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download Unity. there are tons of free assets out there to mess around with.

If not make simple cubes and place them around levels. nothing has 'look' top-notch during learning process; all that matters is you understand the frameworks of the engine you're using.

Gradually with time spent working on this you'll feel an affinity towards one aspect of the dev process. Don't confuse it with an Epiphany; that rarely happens in our field despite a lot of people saying so.

4 hours ago, KingdomFighter74 said:

(nor do I have the desire to)

I understand you don't feel interested to make your art now but the problem with that attitude is that this lack of desire if not handled in the very beginning will soon spread to other areas in the process. Its extremely contagious. I know you think its easy for me to say this but believe me when I tell you we've all been in the exact same position as you are.

the reason i suggested Unity is because if at all one day you decide to pursue this professionally Unity is a great stepping stone for it.

Edited by TheUbiquitousAnomaly
added sentence

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I have a friend who used Unity and immediately dropped it because the tutorials on the website are outdated. Apparently, the new version is different and the practice tutorials aren't adjusted to it. He spent two hours looking around for the right code just for the Space Shooter tutorial.

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Game development is a challenging hobby and it's not always possible to find whatever you want in under 2 hours. It is also a rapidly evolving field and published articles and tutorials can go out of date quickly. However, that doesn't mean the tools aren't worth using. Unity is a perfectly good tool used by thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands, so it could work for you.  If you find that you're following an official tutorial and things are slightly out of date, you could ask on the Unity forums for help and someone can probably tell you what you need to know to bridge the gap between old code and the new system.

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I think my first experiment was with Stencyl, why not trying that?! 

In there you visually assemble blocks of code like if it where a puzzle, you don't even realize you're programming, I think is an easy way to start :P

This was my first attempt at making something that work, some sort of app. Abandoned project x_x 

-> http://www.stencyl.com/game/play/11590

Edited by MarcusAseth

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10 hours ago, KingdomFighter74 said:

I have a friend who used Unity and immediately dropped it because the tutorials on the website are outdated. Apparently, the new version is different and the practice tutorials aren't adjusted to it. He spent two hours looking around for the right code just for the Space Shooter tutorial.

As Kylotan has said Game dev is a very challenging thing. If your end goal is to pursue this purely as a hobby you can go straight into Gamemaker and fiddle around to understand how systems work. But do keep in even with Game maker you're going to come across a lot outdated facts. To be honest most see it as a drawback but I see it as an opportunity to challenge yourself; You're always going to come across something that is either outdated or has no answer on the web no matter what package you use.

The reason I stress with Unity is because it is one of the industry standard tools which is extremely beginner friendly. You're going to come across a lot of limitations with Gamemaker but as I said if all that you want to do is get a game running then that would suffice.

 

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Gamemaker is easy to use for simple projects, I'm told. However, I jumped straight into OpenGL. Good IDEs (the programs you use to write the program. I know, a bit Inceptiony, but...) will have a button for a complete setup to do 2D OpenGL, maybe even 3D when / if you go there. I use wxDev-C++ and just click a few buttons to get the basic setup (a spinning triangle), then take it from there. As for assets... come on, you can do a stick figure or triangular spaceship in paint ;) Just try to copy the old Asteroids game, then graduate to PacMan and oldschool Mario. The graphics are easy to make!

Edited by Embassy of Time
Typo

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> However, I jumped straight into OpenGL. Good IDEs (the programs you use to write the program. I know, a bit Inceptiony, but...) will have a button for a complete setup to do 2D OpenGL

@Embassy of Time how does this work? I've been wanting to dig into something like this but my knowledge of programming is pretty bare bones. are there particular resources you could link me to?

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Here is how long you can talk and advise something. Define what you like in game development. It is possible to program - start to learn, for example, c# for the unity engine. Good and modern choice. Myself use it. If you love to draw, develop it in yourself. Draw every day. Choose your drawing style and practice. Buy yourself a graphics tablet and can join any team to develop your game. 
In General, you should try to develop in this. I do not have time to do in the world of gaming, but spent to study and practice for about 3 years.
Thank God there is the Internet. Good luck in development.

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14 hours ago, KingdomFighter74 said:

I have a mac. Is there an equivalent to paint? 

I think GIMP2 is multi platform, and although it's more complex, it should be able to do the job. Other than that, I know nothing about Macs (including Big ones), sorry....

9 hours ago, TheUbiquitousAnomaly said:

> However, I jumped straight into OpenGL. Good IDEs (the programs you use to write the program. I know, a bit Inceptiony, but...) will have a button for a complete setup to do 2D OpenGL

@Embassy of Time how does this work? I've been wanting to dig into something like this but my knowledge of programming is pretty bare bones. are there particular resources you could link me to?

Hm.... Maybe I should do a "DareDev's guide to OpenGL", for people with more ambition than common sense (like myself) :) But in short:

1: Get wxDev-C++.

2: Start a Project. Use the Multimedia tab and OpenGL. You should get a complete program with setup 'main' file. If you run it, you get a small window with a spinning triangle.

3: Find the spot where it has a lot of "glVertex" commands. That's the spot that draws the triangle.

4: Tamper with the numbers, to get a feel for what does what. glTranslate moves the camera, glRotate spins the triangle.

5: Google the little commands you see around the drawing code. Most commands are straight forward.

My own project is meant to become open source, and to be used to teach others how to do (3D or 2D) OpenGL -very- quickly, like a crash-boom-bang course kinda thingy. But it is not quite there yet. If people get all mad supportive on the matter, I might take it open source before it was intended, but only if there is a real need. There are lots of tutorials out there, I have nooo idea if my stuff can add anything of value at this point....

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21 hours ago, Embassy of Time said:

1: Get wxDev-C++.

I wouldn't particularly recommend this.  You can get or create project templates for most development environments, so that shouldn't be a particularly compelling reason to use an outdated and buggy option.

Software is a fast-moving field, and a beginner getting started with a five-year-old option is setting themselves up to be rather behind the times.

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On 17/9/2017 at 6:07 AM, TheUbiquitousAnomaly said:

this is good stuff

Thank you very much :)

On 17/9/2017 at 12:34 PM, jbadams said:

I wouldn't particularly recommend this.  You can get or create project templates for most development environments, so that shouldn't be a particularly compelling reason to use an outdated and buggy option.

Software is a fast-moving field, and a beginner getting started with a five-year-old option is setting themselves up to be rather behind the times.

I tried a handful of other IDEs, but none of them provided anything useful. Granted, this was a while back, things may have changed since. Is there a tutorial that you could link to that shows another IDE doing it for OpenGL? I'm not fresh on going through all of them again to test them out, but if there is one that shows that it can do it, I'm all eyes!

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