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Questions about Templates

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I was doing an experiment, code below:

template<typename T>
struct S
{
	explicit S(T v) :val{ v } {};
	T val;
};

int main()
{
	S<int> MyS('g');
	cout << MyS.val << endl;//Output is 103

	return 0;
}

Even though I am providing T with a type which is int, and I have an explicit constructor, why I have an implicit conversion from char to int? Shouldn't it see that T is int since I'm telling it so and thus give me error for constructing an S out of char? :S

 

Edited by MarcusAseth

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The explicit keyword means that it won't create an instance of the object without you explicitly constructing one - for example, as part of an expression where it might normally make sense to the compiler to cast some object to this type, but where you want to disallow this.

Here, you do explicitly construct an object of the type, so it calls the constructor, and it makes the normal effort to convert the argument for you.

In this example, it's the 'int' that has an 'implicit' or 'converting' constructor, which magically creates an int out of a char. You don't get to change the semantics of ints, though.

To recap: explicit constructors don't say anything about their arguments, they say things about when they can be legitimately called.

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Not grossly. You obviously understand the basic concept, of avoiding the implicit conversion, but you were just unsure which 'end' of the process it applied to. :)

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I'm changing the title of the topic into "Questions about Templates" because I'm experimenting with it and I know I will have more than one, doesn't seems right to make 1000 mini-topics :/

So now I have the code below:

template<typename T>
struct S
{
	S(T v) :val{ v } {};
	T val;
};

template <typename R, typename T>
R& get(T& e)
{
	return e.val;
}

int main()
{
	S<char> MySChar('B');
	cout << "MySChar: " << MySChar.val << endl;
	
	cout << "Returned val: " << get<char>(MySChar) << endl;

	return 0;
}

The function get is not part of the S class, as required from the book exercise (which is "" Add a function template get() that returns a reference to val.")

I don't like that I have to specify the return type when I call it, if I have 5 different instantiation of S it becomes messy, so I was trying to make it in such a way that I can just write get(MySChar) and it just works with wathever instantiation of S, but I am failing on it, code below:

template<typename T>
struct S
{
	S(T v) :val{ v } {};
	T val;
	typedef T type;
};

template <typename T, typename R>
R& get(T& e)
{
	using R = e.type;
	return e.val;
}

int main()
{
	S<char> MySChar('B');

	cout << "MySChar: " << MySChar.val << endl;

	cout << "Returned val: " << get(MySChar) << endl;

	return 0;
}

How would I do that the proper way? :S

 

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47 minutes ago, MarcusAseth said:

I was doing an experiment, code below:


template<typename T>
struct S
{
	explicit S(T v) :val{ v } {};
	T val;
};

int main()
{
	S<int> MyS('g');
	cout << MyS.val << endl;//Output is 103

	return 0;
}

Even though I am providing T with a type which is int, and I have an explicit constructor, why I have an implicit conversion from char to int? Shouldn't it see that T is int since I'm telling it so and thus give me error for constructing an S out of char?

 

 

In C++ words, this is called promotion. Promotions happen automatically.

See for example Integral promotion of this page.

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Well, I kind of found a solution to my last question (by throwing everything at random at it), which is auto& return type. But still out of curiosity, what would be the second best alternative to auto, using templates? :P

template <typename T>
auto& get(T& e)
{
	return e.val;
}

 

Edited by MarcusAseth

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You're probably looking for the decltype keyword, but this is all too abstract for me to even work out what you're trying to do at a glance.

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15 minutes ago, Kylotan said:

but this is all too abstract for me to even work out what you're trying to do at a glance.

nothing too fancy, I'm just trying to make the code below compile without changing it but just by modifying that get() function 

The code below the commented line that says "//THIS 5 LINES BELOW NEEDS TO COMPILE"

int main()
{
	S<int> MySInt(5);
	S<char> MySChar('B');
	S<double> MySDouble(2.2);
	S<string> MySString(string("wow!"));
	S<vector<int>> MySVec(vector<int>(4, 99));

	cout << "MySInt: " << MySInt.val << endl;
	cout << "MySChar: " << MySChar.val << endl;
	cout << "MySDouble: " << MySDouble.val << endl;
	cout << "MySString: " << MySString.val << endl;

	cout << "MySVec: ";
	for (auto& e : MySVec.val)
		cout << e << " ";
	cout << endl;

	//THIS 5 LINES BELOW NEEDS TO COMPILE
	cout << "Returned val from get(): " << get(MySInt) << endl;
	cout << "Returned val from get(): " << get(MySChar) << endl;
	cout << "Returned val from get(): " << get(MySDouble) << endl;
	cout << "Returned val from get(): " << get(MySString) << endl;
	cout << "Returned val from get(): " << get(MySVec)[0] << endl;

	return 0;
}

So this is the function with decltype (assuming I am using it correctly) but doesn't work as well :/

template <typename T, typename R>
R& get(T& e)
{
	decltype(e.val) R;
	return e.val;
}

auto& as return type works just fine and those 5 lines compile, I was just wondering if there where any other ways :P 

Edited by MarcusAseth

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Moving to a new question, why is the code below not compiling if I uncomment one of the 4 commented-out lines ?

Function "set(Container, newValue, ID)"  takes a "MyContainer" class, a new value to set and an optional ID, just in case is a MyContainer<vector<int>>.

inside of it, takes the "val" of the MyContainer which returns wathever it is containing, in the example case is indeed a vector<int>&, but as soon as I try to use an operator<< or operator= on Vec, this thing doesn't compile...what am I not getting here? :S

template<typename T>
struct is_Container {
	static const bool value = false;
};

template<typename T, typename Alloc>
struct is_Container<vector<T,Alloc>> {
	static const bool value = true;
};

template <typename T, typename V>
void set(MyContainer<T>& e, V newVal, int ID = 0)
{
	T& Val = e.get();
	if (is_Container<T>::value)
	{
		cout << "is a vector" << endl;
		//cout << Val[ID] << endl;
		//Val[ID] = newVal;
	}
	else
	{
		cout << "is not a container" << endl;
		//cout << Val << endl;
		//Val = newVal;
	}
}

GcucCqV.png

Edited by MarcusAseth

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When you say something is "not compiling", it's normally polite to give the error message. :) That usually tells you everything you need to know...

 

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14 minutes ago, Kylotan said:

When you say something is "not compiling", it's normally polite to give the error message. :) That usually tells you everything you need to know...

 

Good point, I didn't yet sorted out the problem of my VC being in Italian, but I'll paste the error link :P

I'm getting 2 Compiler Error C2109 on line 52 and 53 where I try to  use Val[ID] inside my "if" block

Quote

subscript requires array or pointer type

And 2 Compiler Error C2679 on line 58 and 59 where I try to use Val inside my "else" block

Quote

binary 'operator' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type 'type' (or there is no acceptable conversion)

But from the screenshot is clearly visible that Val is a vector<int>& therefore I don't get it.. well, since it doesn't run it is failing at compile time or before, so I assume this is because at that time is not known what Val will be, and is only know later on. So how do I get it to "assume" that I will provide a valid variable with those operators (operator[], operator<<, operator=) at run-time?! x_x

Edited by MarcusAseth

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Ok, trough commenting and uncommenting I think I've realized what is going on here:

template <typename T, typename V>
void set(MyContainer<T>& e, V newVal, int ID = 0)
{
	T& Val = e.get();
	if (is_Container<T>::value)
	{
		cout << "is a vector" << endl;
		//cout << Val[ID] << endl;
		//Val[ID] = newVal;
	}
	else
	{
		cout << "is not a container" << endl;
		//cout << Val << endl;
		//Val = newVal;
	}
}

When set() is instantiated with a first parameter that contain a MyContainer of basic type let's say int, then T is int and the expressions 

Quote

//cout << Val[ID] << endl;
        //Val[ID] = newVal;

becomes totally invalid (even though the control flow would never send us there).

On the other hand when I instantiate it with a MyContainer<vector<int>> as first parameter, then the expressions  

Quote

//cout << Val << endl;
 //Val = newVal;

make no sense at all. (cout of vector<int> and assignment of int to vector<int>

Working with templates can be confusing, it seems :P

How is this situation handled? Should Val be passed down to a function template with partial specialization for vectors and non vectors? I think that would work, but can't be too sure with this stuff :P

 

Edited by MarcusAseth

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Function overloading did it, so that must be the way to go, (I hope)

This is actually cool, because I can direct the flow of things toward the no inplicit conversion function overload! :D 

I'm discovering hot water here xD

template <typename T, typename V>
void set(MyContainer<T>& e, V newVal, size_t ID = 0)
{
	cout << "MyContainer specialization called" << endl;
	T& Val = e.get();
	set(Val, newVal, ID);
}

template <typename T>
void set(vector<T>& Val, T newVal, size_t ID = 0)
{
	cout << "vector specialization called" << endl;
	Val[ID] = newVal;
}
template <typename T, typename V>
void set(vector<T>& Val, V newVal, size_t ID = 0)
{
	cout << "NO IMPLICIT CONVERSION called" << endl;
}


template <typename T, typename V>
void set(T& Val, V newVal, size_t ID = 0)
{
	cout << "base type specialization called" << endl;
	Val = newVal;
}
int main()
{
	MyContainer<int> MySInt(5);
	MyContainer<vector<int>> MySVec(vector<int>(4, 99));

	cout << "MySInt: " << get(MySInt) << endl;
	set(MySInt, 22);
	cout << "MySInt: " << get(MySInt) << endl << endl << endl;

	cout << "MySVec: " << get(MySVec)[2] << endl;
	set(MySVec, 3.3, 2);
	cout << "MySVec: " << get(MySVec)[2] << endl << endl << endl;

	cout << "MySVec: " << get(MySVec)[2] << endl;
	set(MySVec, 64, 2);
	cout << "MySVec: " << get(MySVec)[2] << endl << endl << endl;
	return 0;
}

Output:

Quote

MySInt: 5
MyContainer specialization called
base type specialization called
MySInt: 22


MySVec: 99
MyContainer specialization called
NO IMPLICIT CONVERSION called
MySVec: 99


MySVec: 99
MyContainer specialization called
vector specialization called
MySVec: 64

 

Edited by MarcusAseth

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3 hours ago, MarcusAseth said:

S(T v) :val{ v }

I would just use the non-braced initializer list:

S(T v) :val(v)

I only use braced initializer list for zero-initializing arrays. Due to type deductions in C++11/14, braced initializer lists can be tricky.

FYI: setting up VS2017 can be cumbersome (you need lots of LMB clicks) for small C++ tests. You can use the Visual C++ compliant single header web compiler: http://webcompiler.cloudapp.net/.

Edited by matt77hias

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11 minutes ago, matt77hias said:

I would just use the non-braced initializer list:


S(T v) :val(v)

 

curly braces are the safest way, right?

If in there I'm initializing member variables, then { } prevents me to pass argument that would require an implicit conversion and possible truncation, so I just use those always and I never have to think about it because if I make a mistake, then things stop working right away :P

Edited by MarcusAseth

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9 minutes ago, MarcusAseth said:

curly braces are the safest way, right?

If in there I'm initializing member variables, then { } prevents me to pass argument that would require an implicit conversion and possible truncation, so I just use those and I never have to thing about it becuase if I make a mistake, then things stop working immediately :P

Safe? I guess (although in combination with std::initializer_list constructors?).

Obvious? No.

int a[3] = {1};
cout << a[0] << ',' << a[1] << ',' << a[2] << endl; 

 

What do you mean with the "prevention of passing arguments that would require implicit conversion"?

Edited by matt77hias

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28 minutes ago, matt77hias said:

Safe? I guess.

Obvious? No.


int a[3] = {1};
cout << a[0] << ',' << a[1] << ',' << a[2] << endl; 

 

Well, honestly, you example above to me seems obvious though :S

an array of 3 elements taking an initializer list, the initializer list to the right sets the first element to 1.

Quote

What do you mean with the "prevention of passing arguments that would require implicit conversion"?

I mean that the code below won't compile because it requires a conversion from double to int

	int a[3] = { 1.4 };
	cout << a[0] << ',' << a[1] << ',' << a[2] << endl;

If you accidentally passed a float variable you would have lost precision without noticing maybe, that's why I think is valuable to prefer it to the more loose ( )

EDIT: I compiled my example just to be sure, apparently it works, I must have got it wrong from the book o_O

Need to check.

EDIT2: ok, the safety I mentioned won't apply when you use it to initialize an array it seems, but it still work on all the future uses, and I think some safety is better than no safety at all (and it comes for free, so...I'll take it!) :D

Edited by MarcusAseth

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1 hour ago, MarcusAseth said:

EDIT2: ok, the safety I mentioned won't apply when you use it to initialize an array it seems, but it still work on all the future uses, and I think some safety is better than no safety at all (and it comes for free, so...I'll take it!) 

99% of my non-default/non-move/non-copy constructors are explicit, so except for implicit primitive-to-primitive conversions, I personally prefer calling the constructor straight away with () instead of {} (which calls a std::initializer_list constructor if present) in the constructor initializer list. Furthermore, my compiler uses the highest (reasonable, so not Wall) warning level to notify me of possible losses of precision due to for instance implicit primitive-to-primitive conversions.

Edited by matt77hias

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More template stuff.

I have some doubts regarding template, still. This compile and works, and if I understand it right, I need the operator overloads to be templates in case I try to do something like "Number<int>(3) + Number<float>(4.15)" which are two different type.

If I have those operator overloads just taking a plain Number& as argument, then things won't compile. 

And yet, operator>> and operator<< just work fine with a Number&, how does that make sense?!

EDIT: while I was writing this question, I thought that maybe is because inside a particular template instantiation itself, Number is defined to be the unique type for that Number<T>, therefore by saying Number I am actually calling the unique type of that particular instantiation?

If that was the case I could then just have a  return type Number& in the operator overloads instead of return type Number<T>& , can you guys confirm this is the case? :S

template<typename T>
class Number {
	T val;
public:
	//Constructors
	Number() :val{ 0 } {}
	Number(T v) :val{ v } {}

	//Methods
	T& get() { return val; }

	//Operators
	template<typename U>
	Number<T>& operator+(Number<U>& rhs) { val += rhs.get(); return *this; }
	template<typename U>
	Number<T>& operator-(Number<U>& rhs) { val -= rhs.get(); return *this; }
	template<typename U>
	Number<T>& operator*(Number<U>& rhs) { val *= rhs.get(); return *this; }
	template<typename U>
	Number<T>& operator/(Number<U>& rhs) { val /= rhs.get(); return *this; }

	friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& stream, Number& rhs) { stream << rhs.val; return stream; }
	friend istream& operator>>(istream& stream, Number& rhs) { stream >> rhs.val; return stream; }
};

int main()
{
	Number<double> myDouble(3.4);
	myDouble - Number<int>(6.6);
	cout << myDouble << endl << endl;
	
	cin >> myDouble;
	cout << myDouble << endl;

	return 0;
}

 

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Again, what are the compiler errors you get?

These operators are wrong anyway, because they are mutating the left-hand side when they should be returning a new value. If you want += semantics, you should define a += operator.

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9 minutes ago, Kylotan said:

Again, what are the compiler errors you get?

No compile errors, quoting my message above:

Quote

And yet, operator>> and operator<< just work fine with a Number&, how does that make sense?

 

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2 minutes ago, MarcusAseth said:

No compile errors

 

28 minutes ago, MarcusAseth said:

If I have those operator overloads just taking a plain Number& as argument, then things won't compile.

 

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@Lactose Maybe I didn't explained myself properly, I am not considering that as the error, that's why is not even in my code example, and that makes sense because as I said

Quote

 I need the operator overloads to be templates in case I try to do something like "Number<int>(3) + Number<float>(4.15)" which are two different type.

In that case the compile error is obviously I have no operator overload between the 2 different types, if it was Number&.

The question is another one...and is about the absence of ant kind of compile errors :D

 

Edited by MarcusAseth

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Sorry, you're talking in hypotheticals. Can you form a smaller, precise example of the problem? i.e.

  1. What are you doing?
  2. What do you expect or want to happen?
  3. What actually happens?

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    • By Karol Plewa
      Hi, 
       
      I am working on a project where I'm trying to use Forward Plus Rendering on point lights. I have a simple reflective scene with many point lights moving around it. I am using effects file (.fx) to keep my shaders in one place. I am having a problem with Compute Shader code. I cannot get it to work properly and calculate the tiles and lighting properly. 
       
      Is there anyone that is wishing to help me set up my compute shader?
      Thank you in advance for any replies and interest!
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