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    • By Sol R
      Hi guys, I`m starting to learn game development and I'm aiming it for VR development. Right now I can`t afford any VR equipment so until I can, I want to start learning whatever principles needed that will follow with me to VR when I will get it. I started learning the basics of C# and a little bit (play around) with Unity. I have a lot of mess in my head and I want to make it efficient as possible because I`m self-learn all of it. I want to make an efficient syllabus to follow, milestones, to know what I learned and what else should I learn and be as efficient as possible at it. After I will know my route, I will polish my plan more specifically. What I need is the information of what exactly I need (and can) to learn right now for VR development, in what order, and recommended resources for it would be much appreciated.   Thanks a lot in advance. Sol University
    • By samoan62
      I was wondering if anyone here has experience with VR development for Unity. Having previous Unity experience, I'd prefer to stick with Unity but am open to other engines. It's something I've been interested in, and I'm wondering which community/technology is the easiest to use.
      An Oculus Rift costs around $400, so I'd rather not invest money in that if it doesn't have a big community and support behind it. Another option I was looking at was Google Cardboard for Unity. The guy here has a pretty good starter tutorial on VR dev for Android and the headset is only ~$20 and the Moga controller is only another 20 or so. This is definitely the most economical option, but I'd rather not go down that path if no one uses this technology or if VR on Android is crappy or something. 
      The VR community doesn't seem like it's that big, so I'm having a hard time getting a feel for what's popular and what direction the technology is going. 
    • By GameDev.net
      Chris "Crispy" Pusczak, CEO and Creative Director of SymbioVR, discusses virtual reality and the peripherals in VR that help with a deeper level of immersion.
      Twitter: https://twitter.com/symbiovr
      PPTX Slides: Download
    • By Yosef BenSadon
      Hi , I was considering this start up http://adshir.com/, for investment and i would like a little bit of feedback on what the developers community think about the technology.
      So far what they have is a demo that runs in real time on a Tablet at over 60FPS, it runs locally on the  integrated GPU of the i7 . They have a 20 000 triangles  dinosaur that looks impressive,  better than anything i saw on a mobile device, with reflections and shadows looking very close to what they would look in the real world. They achieved this thanks to a  new algorithm of a rendering technique called Path tracing/Ray tracing, that  is very demanding and so far it is done mostly for static images.
      From what i checked around there is no real option for real time ray tracing (60 FPS on consumer devices). There was imagination technologies that were supposed to release a chip that supports real time ray tracing, but i did not found they had a product in the market or even if the technology is finished as their last demo  i found was with a PC.  The other one is OTOY with their brigade engine that is still not released and if i understand well is more a cloud solution than in hardware solution .
      Would there  be a sizable  interest in the developers community in having such a product as a plug-in for existing game engines?  How important  is Ray tracing to the  future of high end real time graphics?
    • By khawk
      Notes from the session.
      Rahul Prasad, Product Manager on Daydream - Daydream SDK, Platform, VR Mode, Daydream-ready.
      Why is mobile VR development hard?
      Need to guarantee:
      Consistent frame rates required High frame rates 90fps on desktop At least 60fps on mobile Low motion-to-photon latency Related to framerate Influenced by other systems on the device If we look at desktop VR, they have plenty of power, plenty of performance, and less worry over temperature constraints.
      In mobile, only get 4W of power (vs 500W), limited bandwidth, no fans with passive dissipation, and a market of mainstream users (vs hardcore gamers).
      Mobile VR systems are somewhere in the middle between the full hardware control of consoles and the wild west of general mobile and desktop development.
      Simplest solutions
      Build for lowest common denominator Build for exactly one device, try to bring the console model to mobile
        GPU Techniques for Mobile VR
      Assume ASTC exists on mobile VR devices - use large block size, always use mipmaps and avoid complex filtering Implement stereo specific optimizations - multiview when it exists, render distance geometry once Avoid submitting multiple layers - really expensive on tiled GPUs, compose multiple layers in your eyebuffer render loop prior to ARP Complex pixel shaders are costly - render particles to lower res buffer, use medium precision when possible Avoid large monolithic meshes - compact, efficient chunks; front-to-back rendering (rely on engines) Prefer forward rendering algorithms Spread work over multiple CPU threads - more threads running slowly consume less power than few threads running quickly Use MSAA - at least 2x/4x when possible, use GL_EXT_multisampled_render_to_texture, discard MSAA buffers prior to flushing Buffer management - avoid mid-frame flushes, invalidate or clear entire surfaces before rendering, discard/invalidate buffers not required for later rendering, single clear for double-wide eye buffers Type of Content Affects Your Approach
      Example: Youtube VR has very different memory, modem, GPU, and CPU patterns than a high performance game. Session times vary, latency tolerances are different.
      Allocate resources appropriate for the content.
      Thermal capacity is your "primary currency". Make tradeoffs based on type of app and thermal budget.
      Game session times 20-45 minute session time. Video, 1-3 hours of session time. Text, several hours of use important.
      Games - high GPU, medium CPU, high bandwidth, low resolution, low modem Video - low GPU, medium to high CPU, high bandwidth, medium to high resolution, high modem if streaming Text - low GPU, low CPU, high bandwidth, high resolution, low modem Bandwidth high across all use cases.
      Thermal management about tradeoffs:
      session time vs graphics spatial audio vs graphics streaming vs graphics 4k decode vs graphics Dynamic performance scaling to manage resources:
      Render target - scale with display resolution and content types Trade resolution for antialiasing - 2x/4x MSAA, consider dynamically adjusting Use modem judiciously - don't light up all available bandwidth, avoid streaming if possible Adjust framerate dynamically - don't let framerate float, snap to full rate or half rate, engines may help If CPU limited - lower spatial audio objects, simplify physics simulation Boost clock rates sparingly Technical Case Study - VR profiling with Systrace
      Comes in Android Studio Tool for profiling mobile Android devices (editor note: walking through case study of using Systrace to understand performance)
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Stuart Whyte, Director of VR Product Dev at Sony, to Deliver Keynote at Develop:VR

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Stuart Whyte, director of VR product development for Sony London Studios will deliver this year’s keynote for Develop:VR.

Whyte, who has close to 30 years’ experience in the video games industry, starting life as an adventure
columnist for Amstrad Action magazine, will open Develop:VR with his keynote entitled, ‘Taking VR to
the Next Level – A Case Study in AAA Games Development’.

Develop VR Full Logo 2017.jpg

In his keynote, Whyte will discuss the current state of the VR industry, the challenges and opportunities
of AAA VR development and suggest potential solutions to maximise success for any sized studio.
As well as the keynote, Tandem Events also announced the following sessions, with more to be

Improve your brain – the real value of VR/AR gaming
Faviana Vangelius, SVRVIVE

Pioneers in the Sesert – The Reality of Developing for Virtual Reality
Andrew Willans, CCP Games

Love your Limitations: Defining Art for Mobile VR
Anna Hollinrake, Climax Studios

Collaborating with Brands to Create Magical VR
Brynley Gibson, Kuju

Serious VR, Making Real Money
Tanya Laird, Digital Jam

Drop Deadline – Delivering a Visually-Excellent, 60fps, Narrative Mobile Shooter to a Fixed Deadline with a Small Team
James Horn, Pixel Toys

Getting Up Close and Virtual with the Automotive Industry: Using VR for the Right Reasons
James Watson, Imagination

Haptics and VR – Touching Virtual Worlds
Anders Hakfelt, Ultrahaptics

Develop:VR is a one day conference and expo focusing on the commercial opportunities that Virtual and Augmented Reality present for today’s game developers and highlighting the tools and techniques needed to produce top selling VR and AR content.

Develop:VR takes place on 9 November at Olympia London and delegate passes can be bought at a Super Early Bird rate, a saving of £100, until 20 September at www.developvr.co.uk.

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