U3D Looking for people that can handle graphics part

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Hi guys,i m looking for someone that can work with me on a "top-down" multiplayer fps as 2d and 3d artist.I used photon server and i can take the part of programming.For now i made only the basic gameplay of the game that include shooting,switch weapon and and damage player.If someone can help me please contact me via e mail: 270514974@libero.it.
I really appreciate your collaboration and hope you have a good day.....
Thanks for you time to read the post
At the bottom i attach some screenshot of the current game,i m sorry that i can't attach a video...

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