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    • By DarkJ1234
      I'm trying to get into game development on linux, But i want an Unity/Unreal like environment to start out with, So i found out Unreal is build-able on linux, and i had a few problems but managed to mess with it enough to get it running, but all the material's are pink for some reason, i'd like advice on how and if i can fix the materials being all pink and super reflective looking, or if there's an alternative i could try similar to Unity/Unreal for linux.
    • By sausagejohnson
      Welcome to the 2D UFO game guide using the Orx Portable Game Engine. My aim for this tutorial is to take you through all the steps to build a UFO game from scratch.
      The aim of our game is to allow the player to control a UFO by applying physical forces to move it around. The player must collect pickups to increase their score to win.
      I should openly acknowledge that this series is cheekily inspired by the 2D UFO tutorial written for Unity.
      It makes an excellent comparison of the approaches between Orx and Unity. It is also a perfect way to highlight one of the major parts that makes Orx unique among other game engines, its Data Driven Configuration System.
      You'll get very familiar with this system very soon. It's at the very heart of just about every game written using Orx.
      If you are very new to game development, don't worry. We'll take it nice and slow and try to explain everything in very simple terms. The only knowledge you will need is some simple C++.
      I'd like say a huge thank you to FullyBugged for providing the graphics for this series of articles.
      What are we making?
      Visit the video below to see the look and gameplay of the final game:
      Getting Orx
      The latest up to date version of Orx can be cloned from github and set up with:
      git clone https://github.com/orx/orx.git After cloning, an $ORX environment variable will be created automatically for your system which will help with making game projects much easier. It will also create several IDE projects for your operating system: Visual Studio, Codelite, Code::Blocks, and gmake.
      These Orx projects will allow you to compile the Orx library for use in your own projects. And the $ORX environment variable means that your projects will know where to find the Orx library.
      For more details on this step, visit http://orx-project.org/wiki/en/tutorials/cloning_orx_from_github at the Orx learning wiki.
      Setting up a 2D UFO Project
      Now the you have the Orx libraries cloned and compiled, you will need a blank project for your game. Supported options are: Visual Studio, CodeLite, Code::Blocks, XCode or gmake, depending on your operating system.
      Once you have a game project, you can use it to work through the steps in this tutorial.
      Orx provides a very nice system for auto creating game projects for you. In the root of the Orx repo, you will find either the init.bat (for Windows) or init.sh (Mac/Linux) command.
      Create a project for our 2D game from the command line in the Orx folder and running:
      init c:\temp\ufo or
      init.sh ~/ufo Orx will create a project for each IDE supported by your OS at the specified location. You can copy this folder anywhere, and your project will always compile and link due to the $ORX environment variable. It knows where the libraries and includes are for Orx.
      Open your project using your favourite IDE from within the ufo/build folder.
      When the blank template loads, there are two main folders to note in your solution:
      config src Firstly, the src folder contains a single source file, ufo.cpp. This is where we will add the c++ code for the game. The config folder contains configuration files for our game.
        What is config?
      Orx is a data driven 2D game engine. Many of the elements in your game, like objects, spawners, music etc, do not need to be defined in code. They can be defined (or configured) using config files.
      You can make a range of complex multi-part objects with special behaviours and effects in Orx, and bring them into your game with a single line of code. You'll see this in the following chapters of this guide.
      There are three ufo config files in the config folder but for this guide, only one will actually be used in our game. This is:
      ufo.ini All our game configuration will be done there.
      Over in the Orx library repo folder under orx/code/bin, there are two other config files:
      CreationTemplate.ini SettingsTemplate.ini These are example configs and they list all the properties and values that are available to you. We will mainly concentrate on referring to the CreationTemplate.ini, which is for objects, sounds, etc. It's good idea to include these two files into your project for easy reference.
      Alternatively you can view these online at https://github.com/orx/orx/blob/master/code/bin/CreationTemplate.ini and here: https://github.com/orx/orx/blob/master/code/bin/SettingsTemplate.ini
      The code template
      Now to take a look at the basic ufo.cpp and see what is contained there.
      The first function is the Init() function.
      This function will execute when the game starts up. Here you can create objects have been defined in the config, or perform other set up tasks like handlers. We'll do both of these soon.
      The Run() function is executed every main clock cycle. This is a good place to continually perform a task. Though there are better alternatives for this, and we will cover those later. This is mainly used to check for the quit key.
      The Exit() function is where memory is cleaned up when your game quits. Orx cleans up nicely after itself. We won't use this function as part of this guide.
      The Bootstrap() function is an optional function to use. This is used to tell Orx where to find the first config file for use in our game (ufo.ini). There is another way to do this, but for now, we'll use this function to inform Orx of the config.
      Then of course, the main() function. We do not need to use this function in this guide.
      Now that we have everything we need to get start, you should be able to compile successfully. Run the program and an Orx logo will appear slowly rotating.

      Great. So now you have everything you need to start building the UFO game.
      Setting up the game assets
      Our game will have a background, a UFO which the player will control, and some pickups that the player can collect.
      The UFO will be controlled by the player using the cursor keys.
      First you'll need the assets to make the game. You can download the file  assets-for-orx-ufo-game.zip which contains:
      The background file (background.png):

      The UFO and Pickup sprite images (ufo.png and pickup.png):
      And a pickup sound effect (pickup.ogg):
      Copy the .png files into your data/texture folder
      Copy the .ogg file into your data/sound folder.
      Now these files can be accessed by your project and included in the game.
      Setting up the Playfield
      We will start by setting up the background object. This is done using config.
      Open the ufo.ini config file in your editor and add the following:
      [BackgroundGraphic] Texture = background.png Pivot = center  
      The BackgroundGraphic defined here is called a Graphic Section. It has two properties defined. The first is Texture which has been set as background.png.
      The Orx library knows where to find this image, due to the properties set in the Resource section:
      [Resource] Texture = ../../data/texture  
      So any texture files that are required (just like in our BackgroundGraphic section) will be located in the ../../data/texture folder.
      The second parameter is Pivot. A pivot is the handle (or sometimes “hotspot” in other frameworks). This is set to be center. The position is 0,0 by default, just like the camera. The effect is to ensure the background sits in the center of our game window.
      There are other values available for Pivot. To see the list of values, open the CreationTemplate.ini file in your editor. Scroll to the GraphicTemplate section and find Pivot in the list. There you can see all the possible values that could be used.
      top left is also a typical value.
      We need to define an object that will make use of this graphic. This will be the actual entity that is used in the game:
      [BackgroundObject] Graphic = BackgroundGraphic Position = (0, 0, 0)  
      The Graphic property is the section BackgroundGraphic that we defined earlier. Our object will use that graphic.
      The second property is the Position. In our world, this object will be created at (0, 0, 0). In Orx, the coordinates are (x, y, z). It may seem strange that Orx, being a 2D game engine has a Z axis. Actually Orx is 2.5D. It respects the Z axis for objects, and can use this for layering above or below other objects in the game.
      To make the object appear in our game, we will add a line of code in our source file to create it.
      In the Init() function of ufo.cpp, remove the default line:
      orxObject_CreateFromConfig("Object"); and replace it with:
      orxObject_CreateFromConfig("BackgroundObject"); Compile and run.
      The old spinning logo is now replaced with a nice tiled background object.

      Next, the ufo object is required. This is what the player will control. This will be covered in Part 2.
    • By sausagejohnson
      Hi Guys, really pleased to announce that my 5 part series on creating a 2D UFO game using the Orx Portable Game Engine has been published in the articles section.

      The series is designed to help beginners download Orx, then use the tools to create your first project in your favourite IDE/OS.
      It then takes you step by step through numerous topics:
      Creating a playfield The ufo movement Keyboard controls Collisions Physics Scores Sounds and; Shadows The series starts over here:
      How to write a 2D UFO game using the Orx Portable Game Engine - Part 1
      If you find any problems, or enjoyed going through it, I'd love to hear about it.
      Graphics for the article series were kindly designed by my friend FullyBugged.
    • By Washantor
      Hello my name is Erik Reis i'm 15 and i just got into game development. I don't want to spend hundreds of bucks on online classes i just want someone to help me. Kinda like a mentor or another new developer I can learn with. I'm young and i'm new and stupid and would love to learn this is just don't know where to start there is so much. I do know some basic C# and i want to use unity. I can do some pixel art though it is not up to the standard i would like but that can be improved. I would really enjoy to meet someone who has knowledge of the subject and can teach me on their spare time. Thanks i really appreciate if your read this post.
    • By Mercury Gate
      Here is the scenario I have pertaining to a combat system I am jotting down on paper.
      The attacker has 100 soldiers each with 1 attack point and 3 health points. The defender has the same.
      All the player has to do is press a button and combat is all computed then the player is just shown the results. From my current example, I would have the attacker's soldiers do 100 points of damage to the defender resulting in 33 defenders being killed. The same happens to the attacker's soldiers. This continues until both sides defeat each other at the same time and it ends in a draw.
      I feel if I introduce a random factor, the battle could get lop-sided and the smaller side could not recover So I thought I would ask the community for their opinions of the very simple combat scenario.
      The game concept I am designing deals with combat from outside the actual conflict. Sort of like a coach and a sports team. You give orders and watch as your units perform them. The game does start small, with 100 to 200 soldiers (all the same) and could grow to larger numbers as well. I was just wanting to get a system in place for small conflict that could scale into larger ones.
      Each side has a unit type (soldier) a unit quantity (100). The player give the order, and the computer does the rest. After both players give their orders, the results are computed instantly. Keeping all things equal, Attack power, defensive power, etc. (I need a baseline) What would be the best way to determine damage? Static numbers, or RNG numbers?
      To use or not use RNG in combat?
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Text Based RPG

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Hello everyone! First if you are taking the time to read this "Thank You!" I'm new to programming (Java and C), and I would like to learn/practice more by making a Text-Based RPG. I have an idea in mind and I kinda started to code it in Java but I'm not sure how to put my bits of code together and would like some help. I'm not asking to make the game for me, but to guide me in the right direction... maybe some books, tutorials or even some one on one if you don't mind.

The game I have in mind is going to contain:

A player, world, leveling system, melee combat system(with some skills), monsters, inventory system, intractable objects(like a tree that you can cut down), item storage system, NPC's that interact maybe a store or something, and a saving and loading system.

After that maybe I would like to add some more Non-Combat skills, a mage and range combat system along with some more skills, and make the world a bit larger with some interesting stuff in it...

Anyways that's a lot so thank you for taking your time to read this, let me know if I can explain anything better or if I didn't explain something enough!

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The most important thing in any challenging project is to write down exactly what your goals are so every step of the way you know what you're trying to achieve. Any effort you put into a project when your goals are fuzzy is potentially wasted effort. It often happens that people will start work on a game and never finish because they end up wasting their effort working toward fuzzy goals. To avoid that fate, write down in full detail exactly what you expect from the game, and that process will focus your mind on the specific problems you must overcome and help you find ways to implement your design.

Here's a link to a guide to writing game design documents: How (and Why) to Write a Great Game Design Document

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If you're writing it in C and you are new, I find the difficult part to be using structs and pointers to create a 'database' of the world. It can get surprisingly complicated very quickly if you aren't thoroughly grounded in that type of stuff. So I personally would make sure you fully understand and do a few test programs involving linked lists and the like.

If you're really impatient and just want to get some exposure and write a small game quickly. you can cheat like I did and just have a function for every room, then a switch statement for player choice. Although this results in a lot of copy and paste ugly code and is not to be recommended.

Let us know how you get on as I'm still trying to find the best way of doing this in C too.

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There is so much structure in this kind of programs that the only sane option is to evolve to an OO-way of writing the code.

You make structs for each kind of data, then for each struct you have a set of functions that take a pointer to "its" struct as the first argument. For keeping track of what function does what, use a name convention for the function name, eg "structname_function(structname *this, ...)".

I found this pattern already before OO was invented (likely I have been writing code too long :P ).

The simple form of the above supports single inheritance, by putting the base struct as its first member. You don't get overloading or polymorphism easily, but usually that's not needed.


Now, if you evolve to this kind of code structure anyway, I don't see the point of not simply switching to a language that has "class" in its vocabulary where you get all the above out of the box, inclusive extensive error checking by the compiler.

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11 hours ago, Scouting Ninja said:

Start here learn how to create a player class and how to set it's stats.


So far I have a very basic player class with all its stats, leveling system, and some other incomplete stuff! I'll attach the file for my player class. Thanks!


10 hours ago, ICanC said:

Let us know how you get on as I'm still trying to find the best way of doing this in C too.

I'm doing it in java since its a more "advance language"...

Edited by rafael rodriguez

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