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Python so where do I start? well I guess I've already started?

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My first goal is to build in python a text-based (next version will have graphics) adventure game scenario where a player enters a tavern, and goes on a quest. Earns money, buys weapons and gets in a fight.

 

So I've got four ideas for games I want to build.

1. a space simulation where a mute evolving clique is tasked with colonising planets - it's also a social network.

My next goal is to build a 3rd person shooter and streets of rage style framework for a action/adventure game based on my story which is about God's mightiest heroes (with mutation sandbox) versus the devil (read pinhead meets bizarro superman).

I also want to build in python, a 3d isometric rpg/sim that looks like the sims 1 but thematically is more like Bully or GTA1, but plays like Hell's Kitchen DS combined with Dofus, with environments combining elements of Phantasy Star, Sonic and art photography of convenience stores, etc.

I also want to build an epic adventure story in RPGMakerMV.

Any advice as to what else I should build in between to get closer to my goal projects.

 

In a few weeks I'll have my first game, I'm not really sure how to turn it into an executable file so i can share it with people who don't have python installed.

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I suppose the obvious question is what is your skill level in programming (both in general and in Python), but if you want to make a space simulation you should look into making simulations (not necessarily game-related)

38 minutes ago, WinterDragon said:

 

In a few weeks I'll have my first game, I'm not really sure how to turn it into an executable file so i can share it with people who don't have python installed.

For this though, you could use py2exe to turn your python progams into executable files.

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I've been coding on and off for years, but haven't really stuck with it before.

python and unity are the tools that most interest me.

I'm gradually working through my first python book and I'm picking up enough that I could actually build a text-based adventure in python. Just a short scenario to test out my understanding of resource trading and how combat might work and going from tavern to shop to mission (to boss level?)

I have a more solid idea of how I would want it to look than I do about how I want to write it, but I really need to sit down for just a few hours each day and write some pseudocode outlining an area of the game, then do some homework (research) and some coding. And keep going like that.

I'm upto "def functions" in the absolute beginner's guide to programming python about 80pgs into a 3-400pgs book. It's all about time management because I pick up and understand it quite quickly, but it takes me forever to get around to sitting down and making time for it. Then again 75% of my time is bug fixing. Which is where the real learning happens.

Generally as a beginner I've been around the block. I've been coding since I was a kid - BBC BASIC, learned logic then adobe dreamweaver and a bit of javascript, tried to learn c++ but the language overcomplicates everything, C# but I don't like .net. settled on python and noticed that it's in some ways a lot like BASIC - which I liked, so I'm sticking with it, but I picked up Unity because you can do more faster than coding from scratch.

 

Surprisingly I can find very little about how to make a simulation - I'm not even sure which field of theory covers simulations - would you look at app development, software development or using sim engines like gazebosim.org?

Edited by WinterDragon

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Hi, and welcome.

 

26 minutes ago, WinterDragon said:

python and unity are the tools that most interest me.

You're missing a step here, python is a programming language where you write functions, while Unity is a game engine, a huge library with many functions that help you make a game. Unity uses the C# programming language for writing functions (ie for using the available set of functions of Unity).

The above is a bit simplified, as C# is an object-oriented language, so many functions are hiding in classes. But overall, for your interest, a logical path for you is: python -> C# -> C# + unity. There is also a Mono compiler for C#, which may be more to your liking.

31 minutes ago, WinterDragon said:

I'm gradually working through my first python book and I'm picking up enough that I could actually build a text-based adventure in python.

Sounds good. Text-based has the huge advantage that graphics don't distract you, which makes programming a LOT simpler. That gives you the opportunity to focus on Python programming itself. For your information, the sort-of standard article to read here is

which includes a list of suggested projects. It seems to skip the text-based part, but I'd say keep it.

35 minutes ago, WinterDragon said:

Just a short scenario to test out my understanding of resource trading and how combat might work and going from tavern to shop to mission (to boss level?)

I have a more solid idea of how I would want it to look than I do about how I want to write it, but I really need to sit down for just a few hours each day and write some pseudocode outlining an area of the game, then do some homework (research) and some coding. And keep going like that.

As you will find out, there is a stage before it, namely deciding how it will actually work, at a lower level of detail. What objects play a role there, and what properties do they need for the functionality (eg a shop needs a set of things you can buy, each of these things needs a price. The adventurer must have money (trade-in with other items). So you must have a way to give money or items, and get items (and probably money too, eventually). Items must have an owner (well, at least one, maybe more owners?)

I play this kind of think-games while doing other things that don't need much attention, like walking. Then I re-organize my thoughts by objects, so you get a list of objects that play a role and a set of properties that each item has. You also get a set of functions (like "buy" or "sell", or "look at available items") that you need in one way or another.

Doing this before coding gives you more insight in what to code, and which cases to cover.

 

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thanks that's massively helpful I'll take that on board as I move forward.

so these are my first games to build (to do list)

 

how does it look?

  • text-based adventure
  • Pong = Simple: input, physics, collision detection, sound; scoring
  • Worm = Placement of random powerups, handling of screen boundaries, worm data structure
  • Breakout = Lessons of pong, powerups, maps (brick arrangements)
  • Missile Command = targeting; simple enemy ai, movement, and sound
  • Space Invaders = simple movement for player and enemy, very similar to breakout with the exception that the enemy constantly moves downward, simple sound
  • Asteroids = asteroids (enemies) and player can move in all directions, asteroids appear and move randomly, simple sound
  • Tetris = block design, clearing the lines, scoring, simple animation
  • Pac Man = simple animation, input, collision detection, maps (level design), ai
  • Astro Warrior = top down view, enemy ai, powerups, scoring, collision detection, maps (level design), input, sound, boss ai
  • Pit Pot
  • Pro Wrestling (NES/Sega master system)
  • Joust
  • Gauntlet
  • Dig Dug
  • Rampage
  • Gain Ground
  • Ghostbusters (Sega Master System)
  • Land of Illusion: starring Mickey Mouse = lessons of Astro Warrior (except with side-view instead of top-down view), acceleration, jumping, platforms
  • Psycho Fox
  • Alfred Chicken
  • Kula World/Roll Away
  • Marble Madness
  • Streets of Rage
  • Syphon Filter
  • Skitchin
  • Puzzle Pirates
  • Mortal Kombat 1
  • close combat 1
  • Hell's Kitchen DS
  • an original game

So I'm sitting down to do my first day of writing my text-based adventure and I draw a blank. This is what I've written:

"1.       welcome the player

2.       input from the player (last name)

3.       return the value of first letter of last name and “Viggo.” "

The game is called Viggo and his Quest. I want the player to be Viggo and I'm thematically basing it on the pub scene in Fellowship of the Ring which reminds me of a classic D&D adventure scenario. You go to a tavern and meet a shadowy figure who sends you on a quest. I want to make use of resource trading and combat. But I don't want it to be a really long game I just want to have a finished text adventure which I can share and which teaches me how to code a small game. 

Quote

"As you will find out, there is a stage before it, namely deciding how it will actually work, at a lower level of detail. What objects play a role there, and what properties do they need for the functionality (eg a shop needs a set of things you can buy, each of these things needs a price. The adventurer must have money (trade-in with other items). So you must have a way to give money or items, and get items (and probably money too, eventually). Items must have an owner (well, at least one, maybe more owners?)"

- this is what I need to think about.

so what's your process when you're writing a design doc for a concept that you haven't really developed and then writing pseudocode. Or do I need to write the adventure before I write the game?  Just trying to get past the 'fear of the blank page" - which could be a game in itself.

Update: 10 mins later:

4.       “You are sitting in the tavern nursing your whiskey, when three hobbits sit down at your table and try to start a conversation with you. What do you do?”

5.       input “kill the hobbitses”, “tell them to shut up, then introduce yourself”, “walk away”

 

Update: another 10mins later:

so this is what I have so far:

1.       define methods: battle, shop, quest

2.       welcome the player

3.       input from the player (last name)

4.       return the value of first letter of last name and “Viggo”

5.       “You are sitting in the tavern nursing your whiskey, when three hobbits sit down at your table and try to start a conversation with you. What do you do?”

6.       input “kill the hobbitses”, “tell them to shut up, then introduce yourself”, “walk away”

7.       if kill the hobbitses go to battle method

8.       battle method:

a.       define attribute/resource variables

b.      define player and npc characters

 

now it starts getting complicated...

Edited by WinterDragon

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