• Advertisement

Game Design Analysis YouTube Channels

Recommended Posts

I know of one really good YouTube channel that's all about game design. It's simply called Mark Brown, and he does two different series: Game Makers' Toolkit and Boss Keys. It's a great place for game designers to go and just pick up ideas. He's not really about entertainment, although the videos certainly aren't boring, but more about education. As in, how do existing games do clever things to stand out from other games?

I myself created a YouTube channel with the intent of talking about game design, although I only have one video as of posting (working on the second). Are there any other really good channels like Mark Brown? I've seen other channels with the same intent, but lacking on the execution. Here's my video below.

 

Edited by Lens of Truth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

I watched Extra Credits' blue shell video, which I liked, but their thumbnails make it really hard to tell what a video will be about.

I think Errant Signal is more of a reviewer, which is fine. I thought his Doom video was very well-written, I just would've preferred some background music (although not much to choose from in Doom's OST to back VO).

Raycevick seems to be a mix of design and review, but I only watched one of his shorter videos (TLOU voice acting), so i could be wrong.

 

Thanks for the suggestions. I'll have to sample a little more from each when I've got some time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Lens of Truth said:

Errant Signal is more of a reviewer

Arguably, what's the difference?  Review is just a form of analysis- it's mostly just a semantic difference. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A review is a video that goes in depth on a single game, talking about most, if not all of its aspects: graphics and art design, music and sound, game mechanics, game modes, etc. A game design video focuses on a single mechanic or concept, thus can look at how a multitude of games use that mechanic, either effectively or not.

Errant Signal's Doom review is a single, twenty minute video exclusively focusing on Doom, with a mention of the original Doom and brief mentions of other games. He covered most aspects of the game.

Mark Brown has mentioned Doom several times throughout his videos. But every time he mentions it, he refers only to the glory kill mechanic and how "brilliant" it is. He never has to talk about the graphics, soundtrack, or how long the loading times are because he's not reviewing it. He's just citing it as a game that does something well (relevant to his topic of course.) And if his video does focus on a single game, like Toki Tori 2, he still hones in on a single concept in which to talk about.

So they are different. And right now I have an appetite for game design videos. Reviews much less so.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I disagree on the semantics, but I get what you're looking for.  I still think there's game design wisdom to be found in videos like Errant Signal even if it's delivered in a review style.  There's value in deep-diving into one game to see what it does right or wrong.  And how all of the parts of a game come together is still a part of game design.  You can have one amazingly developed mechanic that's ruined by the implementation of all the things around it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with that. With all the review channels popping up here and there, it's great that there are good ones in the mix. I guess (and you probably know this already) I like Mark Brown's idea of displaying smart design so that game developing viewers can pick up ideas from even obscure games. Also means shorter videos (usually). :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement
  • Advertisement
  • Popular Now

  • Advertisement
  • Similar Content

    • By Gabriel Gonzalez
      Hi everyone, my name is Gabriel and this is my first post here. I graduated from college over three years ago with a degree in Physics and now I want to start a career as a gameplay programmer. Besides a single C++ programming class in college I have not had any prior experience programming. What I have done to learn until now is to use SFML to recreate Arkanoid and Space Invaders. My question is, am I on the right track if I just continue creating games from scratch using libraries such as SFML or would I benefit more if I move on to using an engine such as Unreal or Unity? Also, of how much help (if any) would my degree be when trying to join a team? I live in San Diego, CA if that matters at all.   I do appreciate in advance any guidance anyone could offer me.
    • By MidnightFoxGaming
      Hi I’m looking for a school to attend for game development and design online.
      i have a large interest in wanting to learn game development and programming and design but I don’t have the time or schools close enough to me for an on campus education since my current job has me travel rather often all over the country.
      id prefer one without liberal arts and get right into the core aspects of the major but it seems most schools love them way too much right now.
      if anyone has any suggestions for schools to look into that would allow me to get my bachelors and be able to possibly find a job in the field please let me know
    • By abe97
      Hello all! I'm new to the forum and I'm glad to have found a lot of interesting discussions/topics! 
      Quick intro, I'm currently in school for Independent (indie) Video Game Design, on my last semester and the job search will start in less than 4 months (I'm nervous to say the least). I've learned a lot in school and I'm proud to say that I can make a decent game independently and market it properly. The problem is that I can do all of this, but I don't specialise in anything specific. I'm pretty good at modeling (but definitely not a pro, can only make simple clean models), okay at scripting, design isn't my strength but a big interest and I'm pretty okay at UI/UX but definitely not proficient at all.
      I can't say I specialise in any of the above fields and I know that specialising in something is important in order to have a consistent portfolio and finding a job. 
      Should I focus on specialising on a specific field in the next 4 months (practice 24/7) in order to sell myself to employers or should I practice everything and sell myself as a Jack-of-all-trades? I really want to get a designer job as I enjoy writing GDDs and discussing design during Pre-Production but my Rational Design knowledge is weak and I've never been considered a designer in all my previous projects (always was responsible for art or UI). 
  • Advertisement