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Websites which may help you find a games job

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There are quite a few different Games Job Boards which can help you in your search for a new job in games or simply to find opportunities you may not be aware of.  Hopefully this will help someone.

https://gamedev.jobs - Industry jobs presented by GameDev.net.  Search or browse a wide range of jobs, sign up for job alerts, or upload a resume.  Plenty of jobs from the games industry or related industries.

http://www.gamesjobsdirect.com - Global games job site.  Loads of different game studios across the world.  Mainly game studios with the odd gaming recruitment agency.  You can register your resume to get found

http://www.globalgamesjobs.com - Global games job site.  Fairly new site, but decent array of game studios across the whole world.  Again you can register your CV to get found.  No recruitment agencies using the site currently.

http://jobs.gamesindustry.biz/ - Mainly UK games news and jobs sites.  Loads of agency jobs with some game studios.  Offers CV.

https://gamesjobs.fi/ - Job board for the Finnish games industry

https://www.games-career.com/ - Job board mainly for games jobs in Germany

https://gamejobs.eu/ - Mainly Dutch games jobs

http://jobs.gamasutra.com/ - Mainly USA games jobs, offers CV services

http://www.develop-online.net/jobs - 90% recruitment agency jobs and uk based

https://orcahq.com/jobs - Very good service that brings in a feed of game studio jobs across the world.

https://www.artstation.com/jobs - Jobs in the Art field

http://gamejobhunter.com/

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