TobyTheRandom

The best first game engine to try as a beginner

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GameMaker. It has a great drag and drop workflow, easy to understand concepts. Unlike many of the other drag and drop engines it supports programming, allowing the engine to make all sorts of games.

GameMaker is design to be as easy as possible and even without a tutorial you could make a game with it.

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@TobyTheRandom I don't mean to sound rude (and conciseness is generally a good thing), but this question, as stated, is too vague to be useful. 

First off, what kind of "beginner" are you referring to? Beginning game designer? Artist? Gameplay programmer? Musician? Some/All of the above, or perhaps something not mentioned above? What are your goals? Are you more of a tinkerer/coder, or would you prefer to use a drag-and-drop can workflow? 2D or 3D? Are you trying to make mobile games, PC, console? Etc. A bit more context would help.

And then, even after we have more context, the "what's the best engine..." type of question tends to just open the floodgates for a holy war of Unity vs Unreal vs hand-write-your-own-engine vs some other choice. There is no "right answer" to a question like this. But at least with more knowledge of what you want to do, we can point you towards tools that will help you accomplish your goals.

Edited by masskonfuzion

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7 hours ago, masskonfuzion said:

@TobyTheRandom I don't mean to sound rude (and conciseness is generally a good thing), but this question, as stated, is too vague to be useful. 

First off, what kind of "beginner" are you referring to? Beginning game designer? Artist? Gameplay programmer? Musician? Some/All of the above, or perhaps something not mentioned above? What are your goals? Are you more of a tinkerer/coder, or would you prefer to use a drag-and-drop can workflow? 2D or 3D? Are you trying to make mobile games, PC, console? Etc. A bit more context would help.

And then, even after we have more context, the "what's the best engine..." type of question tends to just open the floodgates for a holy war of Unity vs Unreal vs hand-write-your-own-engine vs some other choice. There is no "right answer" to a question like this. But at least with more knowledge of what you want to do, we can point you towards tools that will help you accomplish your goals.

Well said. I've seen far too many new game developers just run around in circles because of these x vs x arguments, which really makes it difficult for the person to make a choice without thinking "Am I really using the best tool?". I really wish the general direction set for new people is to just take a tool that fits your basic requirements, don't pay attention to anything else out there until you've made a few games and require something different because of limitations. It's far more important to make good games, than to use a tool because x number of people call it the best. The "best" can be subjective, and if it's really the "best" because of technology and the features provided, a new game developer isn't going to be even able to utilize those features, so why bother at such an early stage.

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Can any of you be my mentor (if you are indeed a professional game developer). To be honest, I just started my journey in this industry of game development. My goals are; I want to improve my coding skills because I have little to no experiences of coding (I know some basics of python syntax), I want to make simple 2d platformer with a drag and drop game engine (but with a little bit coding to hone my coding skills) and I also want to improve my artistic skill.

 

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9 hours ago, TobyTheRandom said:

Can any of you be my mentor (if you are indeed a professional game developer).

I recommend using this website as your mentor, it's filled with professionals from all parts of the game development industry.

A good place to start is here: 

 

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7 hours ago, TobyTheRandom said:

Can any of you be my mentor (if you are indeed a professional game developer). To be honest, I just started my journey in this industry of game development. My goals are; I want to improve my coding skills because I have little to no experiences of coding (I know some basics of python syntax), I want to make simple 2d platformer with a drag and drop game engine (but with a little bit coding to hone my coding skills) and I also want to improve my artistic skill.

 

I'm just going to throw this out there because what you're requesting is a bit much at this stage. I can only speak for myself, but anyone that is at a "professional level" most likely will not provide mentor services for free, and you're looking at a pretty hefty hourly rate for 1-on-1 training. If you're at a level where you're only looking at using drag and drop editors for a simple 2D platformer, having a professional game developer assist would be considered overkill. You would be better off just picking up GameMaker Studio 2, and going through YouTube and tutorials.

Many of us have devoted well over a decade of time to develop skills of the craft, and I'm sure a lot of us are more than happy to help answer specific questions regarding problems you're running into. Once you're ready to dive into programming code, pick up a good book, learn all the basic concepts and start crafting. There is no substitute for time and hands on experience when it comes to programming. You will also find a lot of resources online made by professionals, and very experienced programmers.

 

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Gamemaker Studio 2.  It can do everything you want it to for 2d games.  It has a built in level editor and now with studio version two has a built in tile map editor.  It compiles code so you won't have to worry as much in regards to performance being bad.  Basically its very beginner friendly.  Since you know some python syntax Godot would also be an option.  It doesn't use python but describes its scripting language as python like.  Though I think gamemaker likely has more tutorials available on the internet.

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