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Chaostek Studio

Give back to character design what it deserves. Mix deep personalities, humor and actuality in one game.

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Everyday, the marketplace is saturated with unworthy games developed with the sole purpose of money making. 
We've had enough of this. That's why we are working hard to bring back the concept of giving games a soul, a beautiful soundtrack, an involving story.

This is going to be an action game. Humor and misunderstanding, tipycal of comedy, are going to be foundamental elements of the story, along with references to the real world and the internet.


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When glaciers on Earth melt, the lands were flooded, but floating cities were built and they spread all over the oceans. It's the year 2304 a.d. In our futuristic world every characater is an antropomorphic animal.

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ou will explore it through the eyes of the capibara Spike, alongside to his fledged kiwi friends: Miguèl de las Casas Nobiles Rodriguez y Hernandez Segundos d’Aviz, proud mexican detective, and Spencer, an engineer from New Zealand.

Led by bad luck, the three will have to face the intimidating Felidus Family: a mafia organization controlled by Don, the sicilian jaguar, Ivàn, the russian puma and Nizui, the japanese panther.

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The protagonists will count on the help of various characters like Elinor, a mind twisted goat from the caucasian mountains, who supposedly predicts the future, or Audubòn, an art fanatic pelican spending all of his days at a bar near the port of the city of Wibia.

There are many more characters, each with unique nature and feature, but all with hilarious behaviour. You will give your contribute to the creation of them and the world they live into.

The game is going to be 2D, inspired from Hyper Light Drifter or The Binding of Isaac. 
There are also influences from Ratchet and Clank or Jak and Dexter for the humorous part.

If this somehow inspires or stimulates your curiosity, we'll be happy to tell you more. We have a lot of documentation about the story, the characters and the gameplay, so you just have to write us!

My part


My name is Francesco. 22 y/o. Co-leader in the team.

http://www.chaostekstudio.com

Actually, I'm a full stack web-developer, but I've always wanted to work into game-making, and today I want to try to start this new project with you.

My part is to lead and design this new adventurous and funny world that we invented. 

I can cover various parts of the developing phase, such as coding, music making, UI and environment designing, and as already said, game designing. It depends on what it's needed the most.

(If you want to listen some of my music works just visit: 
soundcloud.com/krower/sets/orchestral
soundcloud.com/chaostek/underwhat-er)

(Expected) Revenue


You believe in this project and know how and where to sell this game? Awesome! Come to work with us and do everything you think it's needed. 

(Oh, just saying... if you want to invest on us or donate, we're absolutely open)

Jokes apart... No revenue for the moment, but if you really know how to monetize it, you're welcome. We think that the project itself has the right potential to be sold, one day.

Risks & challenges


Risks? To waste this idea. Honestly, we have to do this. One way or another.

We're searching for Digital artists


You will make the game look amazing. We need (in-game) drawings for: - Character Sprites - Buildings and environments - Vehicles - Weapons - Items - Everything else you can do that fits the game.

Requirements:


Good digital drawing skills. Ability to create a good looking and homogeneous environment. Ambition and sense of initiative.

Offer


If we go commercial, you'll have your percentage on the income. Doesn't matter how much we make. It depends on the number of people in the team and the budget we have.

Write us if you think you're the right person for this job. Hope to see you soon.

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Interesting, i would like to play that. 

Im a big fan of binding of isaac and hyperlight drifter. Id be glad to keep myself updated on this. 

Edited by Sh!tShack

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Hoping to give my talents to your team.

Skills;

3D character (low-poly), Concept Artwork, Character Art, Storywriting. and that's all. Apart from this (what I think is important) I have a deep passion in developing games.

Hoping to work with you soon.

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