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Game School Online™ Announces Winter Enrollment Open Through December

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Game School Online™ Announces Winter Enrollment Open Through December

Los Angeles, CA - December 2017

 

Free Winter Term Enrollment!

Free Winter Enrollment:

Game School Online™, the first and only free online game development school of its kind, has opened enrollment for the winter term, which begins in January of 2018. GSO™ currently offers curricula in environment art and lighting for games, focusing specifically on Unreal Engine 4. GSO™ will be adding two new courses for the winter term, “Advanced Lighting Concepts with Unreal Engine 4” and “Advanced Hard Surface Modeling.”


 

Free Workshop!

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December Free Workshop:

In addition to winter enrollment, GSO™ will have a free online workshop, “Animating For Games and Movies”, with Veara Suon, Senior Animator at Double Negative. Veara has worked in the AAA games industry, working on franchises like Destiny and Bioshock. Veara also works in the film industry, having worked for famed studios like Weta, ILM, and Sony, contributing to films like Pacific Rim 2, Spiderman, and Avengers. In this month’s free GSO™ workshop, Veara will be discussing topics such as:

  • Sharing techniques on how he animates for games and film

  • Advice on how students can get a job in games or film

  • Advice on how working professionals can switch from games to film, and vice versa

  • Job relocation

The workshop will last for an hour, with allocated time for Q & A from the audience. The workshop will take place on December 14 at 8pm PST. As usual, our monthly workshops are absolutely free and anyone is welcomed to join us. To RSVP, please visit our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/139461393377301/?active_tab=about


 

Scholars Available For Mentoring!

Scholar Lineup:

Scholars are our mentors, working industry professionals currently working on your favorite games and franchises- here to help you learn to be a professional game dev, with one on one live private sessions. Our current lineup of scholars includes:

 


 

We believe that education should be free for everyone! Come join us at Game School Online™ and see what the future of game development education looks like today! For more information about Game School Online™, available courses, scholars, and events, please visit http://gameschoolonline.com/



 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gameschoolonline/

Twitter: @GSOscholar

Discord: https://discordapp.com/invite/BzU5Fq2

Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/gameschoolonline



 

About Game School Online™ (GSO™)

Game School Online™ is the first ever, completely free game development training program. GSO™ was founded by veteran developers working in the AAA games and entertainment industries. Featuring courses authored by working industry professionals, students are able to learn production techniques and workflows used to ship some of the biggest IPs and AAA franchises. Industry pros known as “scholars”, work with students providing private live sessions to help you become “industry” ready. All courses are available for free, no trials or demos- it’s completely free for anyone that wants to learn how to become a skilled game developer. For more information, please visit our website: http://gameschoolonline.com/

Game School Online™ and GSO™ are registered trademarks Game School Online, LLC. All other brand names, product names or trademarks belong to their respective holders.

 

Contact

Game School Online, LLC.

info@gameschoolonline.com


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