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123iamking

Why most companies pick Unreal Engine 4 instead of CryEngine 5

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I really don't understand this, CryEngine 5 has so much advantages over Unreal Engine 4.

1st, CryEngine 5 is Free (if you want it to),  According to this post

Quote

Cryengine 5 was released under "pay what it's worth to you" license model.

If that's zero, then it's zero.

If that's $100,000 then it's $100,000.

2nd, CryEngine 5 give you source code, according to Get CryEngine page

Quote

Full Engine Source Code

For the first time ever, we are giving all members of the CRYENGINE community full access to the engine’s source code, allowing them to create more ambitious experiences than ever before

But I see the list of game made with CryEngine 5 and list of game made with Unreal Engine 4, I'm stunned that a lot game titles choose Unreal Engine 4 over CryEngine 5.

One claims that game titles pick Unreal instead of their proprietary engine because

Quote

For each of these titles, it was likely determined that it was cheaper and more effective to license an existing engine and toolset compared to the cost of upgrading or replacing the old one to suit a next-generation hardware platform.

 

But why not go with CryEngine V? Am I missing something?

Edited by 123iamking
gramma fix

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Well, I personally like the CryEngine .. though from what I know it didnt always used to be free, the CryEngine 5 is a fair bit newer in terms of release date compared to the Unreal 4 .. and the CryEngine had a fair few issues a long the way. Technology wise when it wasnt free it fell behind the Unreal engine a fair bit so a lot of companies just moved towards unreal (plus I think Unreal has mostly always been more popular anyways).

And essentially, as a game engine.. when your competitor already has their foot in the door, it seems though it would be easier for companies that use it to stick with it on a basis of.. if it works for their projects and it is something they are already used to it becomes more cost effective due to time savings then switching to an entirely new engine.

There are however likely a plethora of other reasons too :D

Edited by GibbonThatCodes

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I personally think CryEngine 5 picks a smart move when adopting Pay-what-you-want license. If a successful game maker sells their game (which made with CryEngine 5) big time, there is no way he gonna pay less than thousands buck (because successful people are usually generous).

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12 hours ago, 123iamking said:

I really don't understand this, CryEngine 5 has so much advantages over Unreal Engine 4.

The largest part of it is that it's a broken engine. It has all the power but none of it is connected right. What is the point of all that power if there is no way to use it.

It is the hardest engine to use among engines that are free at the moment. You need a full team just to make a simple game.

Lumberyard isn't better at all, there all they did was add a bunch of new powerful tools but didn't connect them properly; so all they do is bloat the engine but nothing works.

 

The reason Unreal has so much more games is because so many more people actually managed to make a game using the engine.

CryEngine is a sports car with no steering wheel and the gearbox is on the seat next to the driver for who knows what reason.

12 hours ago, 123iamking said:

2nd, CryEngine 5 give you source code

So does Unreal.

12 hours ago, 123iamking said:

One claims that game titles pick Unreal instead of their proprietary engine because

Quote

For each of these titles, it was likely determined that it was cheaper and more effective to license an existing engine and toolset compared to the cost of upgrading or replacing the old one to suit a next-generation hardware platform.

What they are saying is, that it is so out of date and un-usable that they would almost have to buildup the engine from scratch again. If you don't you end up with Lumberyard that shares most of CryEngines problems; as a result very few developers use it.

 

CryEngine is free because if it wasn't, no one would use it at all.

Edited by Scouting Ninja

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On 12/12/2017 at 3:27 PM, 123iamking said:

I really don't understand this, CryEngine 5 has so much advantages over Unreal Engine 4.

1st, CryEngine 5 is Free (if you want it to),  According to this post

2nd, CryEngine 5 give you source code, according to Get CryEngine page

But I see the list of game made with CryEngine 5 and list of game made with Unreal Engine 4, I'm stunned that a lot game titles choose Unreal Engine 4 over CryEngine 5.

One claims that game titles pick Unreal instead of their proprietary engine because

 

But why not go with CryEngine V? Am I missing something?

You talking about advantages of CryEngine 5 over Unreal Engine 4. But pointed only at price and availability of  source code. But you said nothing about toolset and feature list of each.

Main reason why people use technology is not price and access to source code but how useful that technology in development of their soft.

UE 4 is much more comfortable game engine with great editor than CryEngine 5. That is  why UE 4 dominating over CryEngine 5.

Edited by _Engine_

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On 12/12/2017 at 2:27 PM, 123iamking said:

1st, CryEngine 5 is Free (if you want it to),

Have you ever heard the phrase "You get what you pay for"? In the case of multimillion dollar game franchises the need for support (included in the price) is paramount. 

On 12/12/2017 at 2:27 PM, 123iamking said:

2nd, CryEngine 5 give you source code

So does UE4, even if you're a hobbyist and use it for free. There's plenty of different branches on the UE4 repository from different developers.

Also - the amount of tutorials, books, videos and more educational material available for UE4 make it very accessible, as such there is a large talent pool of people able to use UE4. Hence, if you're a studio and are looking to increase the number of staff on a game hiring contractors and/or salaried staff proficient in UE4 is much easier.

 

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UE4 and Unity are both easier to begin with than CRYENGINE, and I think that accounts for a lot of the reason you see more projects using them. I would't put too much stock in games in production with an engine, only ones that make it to shipping. The figures are likely similar for starting and shipping, but it's hard to tell without hard facts.

These days, your choice of an engine just comes down to the features you want. I made my choice 4 years back, when it was still UE3, and CRYENGINE had the features and capabilities I wanted in my finished product. It's taken a lot of work, but most of that is transferable skills. The code isn't though, and there's now almost 30,000 lines of it.

Speaking of which, I just prefer CRYENGINE c++ to the bastardised stuff needed to make UE4 work. It works cleanly with all the external tools, intellisense works, and it uses the STD libraries. That's a big win IMHO.

In the meantime, many of the features are now common to all the engines.

UE4 and Unity have some definite advantages over CRYENGINE, but don't count us out yet. There's been a lot of work lately on boring old bug fixes, refactoring and community, and things are changing.

In the end, no-one can tell you what engine to use, pick the one that best suits your project, put your head down and work your ass off.

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Ultimately, reputation.

The popular term "but can it play Crysis?" leads one to believe that you choose CryEngine when you want to benchmark/fry your video card. Unreal Engine has been proven through the ages to work smoothly and still look pretty good on a variety of hardware. CryEngine has gotten more optimized over the years, the but the sluggish reputation still clouds over it unfortunately.

For me, CryEngine wasn't even a consideration, I had already limited the choice to either use Unity or UE4. Ultimately, I chose UE4 because it has a pretty good portfolio of AAA titles and a decent community. Unity's community is larger but the projects on average tend to be smaller in scale and/or not as impressive visually.

Also, UE4's blueprint system makes it arguably easier than Unity because you can create sufficiently complex game mechanics without typing a line of code. You'll do plenty of "programming" with visual nodes, but no written code much of the time.

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On 12/13/2017 at 3:11 AM, Hodgman said:

The engine source code was so bad, it took me a week to do a task that really should've taken me half a day.

Now you have me super curious about what part you had to work on.

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