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ArbitorSupreme

Is Full Sail University a good choice for learning game development?

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I have gotten mixed reviews about Full Sail University. I don't know if it would be a good choice or a bad one. I look around the web only to find one person saying "this is the worst school to goto" and another person saying "I love this school". I also heard it's not the worth the cost. I have been told it would be better to go to an accredited school and get a computer science degree.

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3 hours ago, ArbitorSupreme said:

I have gotten mixed reviews about Full Sail University. I don't know if it would be a good choice or a bad one. I look around the web only to find one person saying "this is the worst school to goto" and another person saying "I love this school". I also heard it's not the worth the cost. I have been told it would be better to go to an accredited school and get a computer science degree.

Please do yourself a favor, only go to accredited schools!

"The curriculum used for Full Sail University Online is generated utilizing the same educators and advisory boards as campus-based programs. Although the university is not regionally accredited, it is nationally accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC)."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_Sail_University

You're going to be spending enough money just getting your 4 years in, don't throw it down the toilet. You should keep in mind the person working in HR is not a programmer, and may not even know how to write a hello world program in any language. If they cannot recognize your education institution, your resume could very well be tossed in the trash bin because you're not applying with experience, but based on education starting fresh out of school.

I'm not sure why anyone would go to a private school that isn't accredited in the region, and on top of that pay more than state university!

I should also mention that if you intend on upgrading at anytime, if other schools don't recognize your courses, then those credits are useless.

Edited by Rutin

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Will you learn about game development?  Yes.

It is not a Computer Science degree, and it is far more expensive than most schools, about 2x-6x more than most state schools.

If your family has more money than most, and you are interested in locking yourself into games while knowing 80% of college students change majors at least once and on average students change 3 times through school, and if you don't mind limiting your career options to a single field rather than everything related to computer science, then it can be a great school.

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I don't know 1st hand, but 2nd had sources tell me it;s a good school.

For some reason I've received the most applicants from people at the school, which could mean they are doing something right.

I heard the teachers are big on recommending students do projects, which is good advice.

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On 1/9/2018 at 6:59 PM, GeneralJist said:

I've received the most applicants from people at the school, which could mean they are doing something right.

I think a high number of applicants points the other direction.

They're applying for jobs. That could mean the people are struggling to find jobs, or are having trouble keeping their jobs.  It may mean they're dissatisfied with something related to the job, such as lower wages or difficulty getting promoted.

People who are comfortable in their careers (getting responsibilities and wages they prefer) tend to stay in the jobs as long as they are able.

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In the games industry, even good people in good jobs hop around often to different companies, but it's usually by invitation or networking, not by application. I'm afraid I have to agree with frob that it's likely these applicants are spamming applications out because they're desperate to find a job.

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Perhaps,

I was more getting the sense that students were encouraged to find out of school projects to work on. 

But It's also a red flag that the school is not regionally accredited.

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1 hour ago, GeneralJist said:

Perhaps,

I was more getting the sense that students were encouraged to find out of school projects to work on. 

But It's also a red flag that the school is not regionally accredited.

This is still the #1 reason I would avoid going there. #2 would be the degree type, and #3 would be the cost.

I've seen countless people in the last decade get these "Game Programming Degrees", and once they figure out that (Game Company A, B, and C) wont hire them and they need a job to support themselves, they're getting passed over for candidates that have Computer Science and Information Technology degrees in other roles.

It's always easy to back track from a Computer Science degree into game programming, but not a Game Programming degree into roles that primarily hire Computer Science graduates. The amount of time invested is better spent doing it right from the get go, and branching out later.

I've had many friends make this mistake and they wished they could go back and redo everything. One friend was in such a tight spot he had to open up a consulting company to teach game programming because he wasn't able to land a job without the proper degree. Lucky for him it worked out into a full time gig!

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