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uastar - Simple A* path finder in C

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There are a bunch of path finding implementations online. But, to be honest, I wasn't much satisfied with  most of them, for one of these reasons:

  • Dynamic memory allocation in the middle of the algorithm
  • Algorithm that does too much (more than what is needed)
  • Too many files for just a single task

So I made this two-files (`uastar.c` and `uastar.h`) library: https://github.com/ferreiradaselva/uastar

No memory dynamic allocation. Straight to the point (the README.md explains how to use).

It's nothing biggie, but certainly useful.

Path finder at work:

4iPYNk3.gif

I'm leaving this in announcements, because I probably won't add more features (it's pretty much done).

Edited by ferreiradaselva

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