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flier1285

new here and to devolopment

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greetings everyone.

 

Not sure where, or if, introductions are in order, but I'm new to the site and new to video game creating. I am currently, (with my small, new to the work team ) working on trying to get a playable prototype of my first attempt at a game this week after spending about a month reading up on C# and watching tutorials on blender and unity,

 

about me personally, always been into game, always loved writing stories. and, eventually, I want to write and design good story driven games, ( I dream of making a game along the lines of Final fantasy, but, I am sure both my game making and my story tell would have to get a thousand time better, until then practice. )

 

while I do not have a prototype out yet, my team and I are working on a turn based strategy game ( think, final fantasy tactics, fire emblem,  vandal hearts )

 

we know that our first attempt, probably wont be anything to write home about, but with a team of three, a month (and a half if need ) of  trying to get the game up and running. then learn from it and try to make our next game that much better. the goal is to someday have our own studio, but I am sure a lot of people have that same goal.

 

I have read a little bit around before joining ( and thank you for allowing my newbie try hard self to join ) and I welcome any tips.

 

oh picked unity because supposedly it can do a lot of different games well, and figured we might as well learn that one, and blender cause it was free, as while I work hard at both my real world job and my dream job, money is still pretty tight.

my team pretty much consist of two coders (myself being a "one" the story writer (that is all mine at this point ) a trying artist in blinder starting with sprites instead of full 3d high end models. We do not have anyone to really make sound (I have messed around with those free music making sites, haven't found anything I've made that I could stand for more then to seconds )

 

with that in mind, I do have one question, with unity, people can work on the same project, but what are tips, ways, for people to work on the same game together and bring them together? ( I do planning on buying to more books on the subject and reading, but asking here couldn't hurt... to much...  )

Umm, if anyone has question for me, let me know and I'll answer. thank you again for allowing me to join, and hope everyone is having a great day!

 

 

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5 hours ago, flier1285 said:

with that in mind, I do have one question, with unity, people can work on the same project, but what are tips, ways, for people to work on the same game together and bring them together?

You should ask that in the Production And Management forum (not in an introduction post). 

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Welcome! You're off to a great start if you have a team of people willing to work together on it.

 

Unity has some stuff built in for collaberation. You should probably begin by taking a look at that.

https://unity3d.com/teams

As you get more experience, you'll start knowing how to collaberate better while not stepping on one anothers' toes. In the mean time, just working on separate pieces, especially ones that work together, might be a good suggestion.

 

As far as sound, you'll have to address that eventually. For the sound effects in a 2D game, synthesizers can do a pretty good job. I own about half a dozen synths or so. I took a synth programming class on-line with Berklee. And I'll let you in on one of the little secrets: most sound designers don't really know how the synth produces music either; it's basically a glorified set of buzzers and you set envelopes and filters on it to shape the buzzer sound, which ultimately means professionals spin the dials and see "what they get". I mean, there is some craft to it and a fair amount of knowledge, especially if you are going to make music with it. But learning how to set an Attack-Sustain-Decay envelope is like half the battle. Use that to control a filter and you have a basic synth. So, just get in there and play with it; that's what the pros do. It's mostly about just spinning the dials until a happy accident comes out and then using THAT.

 

As for learning music, that's a whole 'nother thing. My advice on that is: forget about it. I've been a musician since like forever. It's not something you can learn over-night, or even in a year. I mean if you have the world's best teachers, you might at least be respectable if you put in several hours a day every day of hard work after about a year. I've seen a few people do that. But in general, even with really good teachers, you're not going to be a good musician without putting in about 10 years of work. And you're probably going to have to put in more like 20 years before other musicians are really impressed with your stuff. You are either completely committed to it or you won't make it. People spend life times trying to get good at it. It's one thing if you are already an accomplished musician and know what you are doing, but if you are not, you can't fake it and you have a decade of hard work ahead of you to get there. And in your case, you could be spending that time learning coding or visual art or animation or all kinds of game programming stuff. So, find a musician to do the music and scoring. Schools are a great place to look for musicians willing to work free. If you are still in school you can try your school. 

 

I would look around a school near you once you have a demo of the game working that somewhat shows how the game works and most of all that you guys are serious and have at least some idea of what you are doing. Then you can try to find a musician that wants to join in the fun. I imagine that quite a few musicians who are young and just starting out, but have a fair amount of skill might be willing to compose a bit for free on such a project if you can demonstrate that the project is actually going to get finished, which usually means you are almost done with it, especially on your first project. Most musicians only play one type of instrument. So, you might look for someone who plays keyboard. The problem with keyboard players is they often take piano lessons and learn only to play other peoples' music but never learn to compose. On the other hand, keyboard/piano has a larger range than other instruments and if such a person does know how to compose, they are likely to understand it a lot better than other musicians and are more likely to be able to compose better.

 

 

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