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Removing Youtube Tutorials

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For those that don't know me. I am the individual who's two videos are listed here under setup for https://wiki.libsdl.org/Tutorials
I also run grhmedia.com where I host the projects and code for the tutorials I have online.
Recently, I received a notice from youtube they will be implementing their new policy in protecting video content as of which I won't be monetized till I meat there required number of viewers and views each month.

Frankly, I'm pretty sick of youtube. I put up a video and someone else learns from it and puts up another video and because of the way youtube does their placement they end up with more views.
Even guys that clearly post false information such as one individual who said GLEW 2.0 was broken because he didn't know how to compile it. He in short didn't know how to modify the script he used because he didn't understand make files and how the requirements of the compiler and library changes needed some different flags.

At the end of the month when they implement this I will take down the content and host on my own server purely and it will be a paid system and or patreon. 

I get my videos may be a bit dry, I generally figure people are there to learn how to do something and I rather not waste their time. 
I used to also help people for free even those coming from the other videos. That won't be the case any more. I used to just take anyone emails and work with them my email is posted on the site.

I don't expect to get the required number of subscribers in that time or increased views. Even if I did well it wouldn't take care of each reoccurring month.
I figure this is simpler and I don't plan on putting some sort of exorbitant fee for a monthly subscription or the like.
I was thinking on the lines of a few dollars 1,2, and 3 and the larger subscription gets you assistance with the content in the tutorials if needed that month.
Maybe another fee if it is related but not directly in the content. 
The fees would serve to cut down on the number of people who ask for help and maybe encourage some of the people to actually pay attention to what is said rather than do their own thing. That actually turns out to be 90% of the issues. I spent 6 hours helping one individual last week I must have asked him 20 times did you do exactly like I said in the video even pointed directly to the section. When he finally sent me a copy of the what he entered I knew then and there he had not. I circled it and I pointed out that wasn't what I said to do in the video. I didn't tell him what was wrong and how I knew that way he would go back and actually follow what it said to do. He then reported it worked. Yea, no kidding following directions works. But hey isn't alone and well its part of the learning process.

So the point of this isn't to be a gripe session. I'm just looking for a bit of feed back. Do you think the fees are unreasonable?
Should I keep the youtube channel and do just the fees with patreon or do you think locking the content to my site and require a subscription is an idea.

I'm just looking at the fact it is unrealistic to think youtube/google will actually get stuff right or that youtube viewers will actually bother to start looking for more accurate videos. 

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I don't think the whole subscription thing is a good idea. Even if your video tutorials are really good, there'll always be free tutorials somewhere else on the internet. And most of the time, people would rather read some free poorly written article than spending money to read decent content. 

Moving content to your website and maybe asking for donations (either patreon or a simple paypal button) would be better. You should also watermark your content if you think people will re-upload your work. :)

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Thanks for the replies.

On 1/20/2018 at 4:29 AM, petitrabbit said:

I don't think the whole subscription thing is a good idea. Even if your video tutorials are really good, there'll always be free tutorials somewhere else on the internet. And most of the time, people would rather read some free poorly written article than spending money to read decent content. 

Moving content to your website and maybe asking for donations (either patreon or a simple paypal button) would be better. You should also watermark your content if you think people will re-upload your work. :)

You are right in people will go with the bad videos they do it even when both are free.
Take these two
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3Ion00p78M 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WeUmb8XeOms here he uses make but because the make only is target to 32 bit mingw on windows he doesn't know how to do it.
Both of those videos the person claims GLEW 2.0 is broken it isn't. He simply doesn't understand there are new compiler flags that need to be set in the first video. The second video he uses make but there isn't a make for mingw-w64 provided for windows. If he knew how to read a make file he could have at least figure that out.

I even go to the point of providing resources like this to make it a bit easier for people
http://www.grhmedia.com/glew.html Where it has the precompiled glew for both mingw64 and mingw.
If they want to compile it themselves not using make but a bat file I even provide those that work with glew 2.0 and above.
Not sure why so many have issues using make but hey. If this makes it easier great.
Right now I'm in the middle of rebuilding the server.

Even did that for SOIL for some guy a while back simply because they asked.
http://www.grhmedia.com/glew/soil.zip

So the money isn't so much for the tutorial itself its to cover bandwidth and the time I spend helping people who need that extra bit of help.
I'm obviously going to have to find some sort of balance though be it patreon or putting the tutorials up for free and charging for additional resource access. Or maybe start simply charging for the one on one work...
Frankly, most the work comes from people having issues with other people's tutorials. 
Wouldn't it be nice if there was some sort of sign to steer people away from crap tutorials. Hmmm. That does give me an idea what about a database for ranking tutorials posted on sites like youtube and so on. Where it tells what is wrong with them like those two listed above.

Thanks again for feed back.

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 I don't think you should be doing this if your not enjoying it

I do like the idea of a database people can vote for tutorials and resources, along with providing what they think is good or bad about it though. Could be useful to some

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