Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Bronco78th

Storing Code Snippets for Newbies

Recommended Posts

Hi All,

Im running through some video tutorials in C# as im newbie. One thing im doing is adding lots of comments to the code so I can go back and revisit the code later and know exacly what is going on.

What id also like to do is store the code snippets in an easy to find place so I can reuse/analyse them later. 

I kind of just want a long scrolling page with all my code and commented snippets on that I can use as reference later which also maintains the snippet  format and is of course searchable.

There seems to be a few apps as well as Git Hub etc to store code snippets but im just wondering which one from a newbie perspective works best for you and why?

Kind Regards,

John

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
5 hours ago, Bronco78th said:

Hi All,

Im running through some video tutorials in C# as im newbie. One thing im doing is adding lots of comments to the code so I can go back and revisit the code later and know exacly what is going on.

What id also like to do is store the code snippets in an easy to find place so I can reuse/analyse them later. 

I kind of just want a long scrolling page with all my code and commented snippets on that I can use as reference later which also maintains the snippet  format and is of course searchable.

There seems to be a few apps as well as Git Hub etc to store code snippets but im just wondering which one from a newbie perspective works best for you and why?

Kind Regards,

John

 

 

I've heard lots of a good things about GitHub, however I personally just create a blank source code file in Visual Studio, and just paste all my code in there. You can format everything as needed.

As someone that has been programming for a very long time, I tend to have folders with a lot of class files for various things that I can include into new projects, or make copies, then modify. I don't store code online.

In your case, you can use either GitHub, or create and file in Visual Studio (or whatever IDE you use), then add comment lines above the code and paste it in. No need to get too fancy for just review code. :) 

Edited by Rutin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second on what @Rutin said, however, I myself use GitHub because I tend to program in different computers (work, home, college), and it is easier for me to access the code online. Do what is more accessible to you. Of course, there are more options other than GitHub, I guess you can take a look at different options here.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GitHub's Gists, specifically, tend to be the most convenient way to do this. Saves needing to actually have git on the computers you are working on (very handy if some of them are shared/lab computers).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement
  • Advertisement
  • Popular Tags

  • Popular Now

  • Advertisement
  • Similar Content

    • By Stalefish
      Automated builds are a pretty important tool in a game developer's toolbox. If you're only testing your Unreal-based game in the editor (even in standalone mode), you're in for a rude awakening when new bugs pop up in a shipping build that you've never encountered before. You also don't want to manually package your game from the editor every time you want to test said shipping build, or to distribute it to your testers (or Steam for that matter).
      Unreal already provides a pretty robust build system, and it's very easy to use it in combination with build automation tools. My build system of choice is  Gradle , since I use it pretty extensively in my backend Java and Scala work. It's pretty easy to learn, runs everywhere, and gives you a lot of powerful functionality right out of the gate. This won't be a Gradle tutorial necessarily, so you can familiarize yourself with how Gradle works via the documentation on their site.
      Primarily, I use Gradle to manage a version file in my game's Git repository, which is compiled into the game so that I have version information in Blueprint and C++ logic. I use that version to prevent out-of-date clients from connecting to newer servers, and having the version compiled in makes it a little more difficult for malicious clients to spoof that build number, as opposed to having it stored in one of the INI files. I also use Gradle to automate uploading my client build to Steam via the use of steamcmd.
      Unreal's command line build tool is known as the Unreal Automation Tool. Any time you package from the editor, or use the Unreal Frontend Tool, you're using UAT on the back end. Epic provides handy scripts in the Engine/Build/BatchFiles directory to make use of UAT from the command line, namely RunUAT.bat. Since it's just a batch file, I can call it from a Gradle build script very easily.
      Here's the Gradle task snippet I use to package and archive my client:
      task packageClientUAT(type: Exec) { workingDir = "[UnrealEngineDir]\\Engine\\Build\\BatchFiles" def projectDirSafe = project.projectDir.toString().replaceAll(/[\\]/) { m -> "\\\\" } def archiveDir = projectDirSafe + "\\\\Archive\\\\Client" def archiveDirFile = new File(archiveDir) if(!archiveDirFile.exists() && !archiveDirFile.mkdirs()) { throw new Exception("Could not create client archive directory.") } if(!new File(archiveDir + "\\\\WindowsClient").deleteDir()) { throw new Exception("Could not delete final client directory.") } commandLine "cmd", "/c", "RunUAT", "BuildCookRun", "-project=\"" + projectDirSafe + "\\\\[ProjectName].uproject\"", "-noP4", "-platform=Win64", "-clientconfig=Development", "-serverconfig=Development", "-cook", "-allmaps", "-build", "-stage", "-pak", "-archive", "-noeditor", "-archivedirectory=\"" + archiveDir + "\"" } My build.gradle file is in my project's directory, alongside the uproject file. This snippet will spit the packaged client out into [ProjectDir]\Archive\Client.
      For the versioning, I have two files that Gradle directly modifies. The first, a simple text file, just has a number in it. In my [ProjectName]\Source\[ProjectName] folder, I have a [ProjectName]Build.txt file with the current build number in it. Additionally, in that same folder, I have a C++ header file with the following in it:
      #pragma once #define [PROJECT]_MAJOR_VERSION 0 #define [PROJECT]_MINOR_VERSION 1 #define [PROJECT]_BUILD_NUMBER ### #define [PROJECT]_BUILD_STAGE "Pre-Alpha" Here's my Gradle task that increments the build number in that text file, and then replaces the value in the header file:
      task incrementVersion { doLast { def version = 0 def ProjectName = "[ProjectName]" def vfile = new File("Source\\" + ProjectName + "\\" + ProjectName + "Build.txt") if(vfile.exists()) { String versionContents = vfile.text version = Integer.parseInt(versionContents) } version += 1 vfile.text = version vfile = new File("Source\\" + ProjectName + "\\" + ProjectName + "Version.h") if(vfile.exists()) { String pname = ProjectName.toUpperCase() String versionContents = vfile.text versionContents = versionContents.replaceAll(/_BUILD_NUMBER ([0-9]+)/) { m -> "_BUILD_NUMBER " + version } vfile.text = versionContents } } } I manually edit the major and minor versions and the build stage as needed, since they don't need to update with every build. You can include that header into any C++ file that needs to know the build number, and I also have a few static methods in my game's Blueprint static library that wrap them so I can get the version numbers in Blueprint.
      I also have some tasks for automatically checking those files into the Git repository and committing them:
      task prepareVersion(type: Exec) { workingDir = project.projectDir.toString() commandLine "cmd", "/c", "git", "reset" } task stageVersion(type: Exec, dependsOn: prepareVersion) { workingDir = project.projectDir.toString() commandLine "cmd", "/c", "git", "add", project.projectDir.toString() + "\\Source\\[ProjectName]\\[ProjectName]Build.txt", project.projectDir.toString() + "\\Source\\[ProjectName]\\[ProjectName]Version.h" } task commitVersion(type: Exec, dependsOn: stageVersion) { workingDir = project.projectDir.toString() commandLine "cmd", "/c", "git", "commit", "-m", "\"Incrementing [ProjectName] version\"" } And here's the task I use to actually push it to Steam:
      task pushBuildSteam(type: Exec) { doFirst { println "Pushing build to Steam..." } workingDir = "[SteamworksDir]\\sdk\\tools\\ContentBuilder" commandLine "cmd", "/c", "builder\\steamcmd.exe", "+set_steam_guard_code", "[steam_guard_code]", "+login", "\"[username]\"", "\"[password]\"", "+run_app_build", "..\\scripts\\[CorrectVDFFile].vdf", "+quit" } You can also spit out a generated VDF file with the build number in the build's description so that it'll show up in SteamPipe. I have a single Gradle task I run that increments the build number, checks in those version files, packages both the client and server, and then uploads the packaged client to Steam. Another great thing about Gradle is that Jenkins has a solid plugin for it, so you can use Jenkins to set up a nice continuous integration pipeline for your game to push builds out regularly, which you absolutely should do if you're working with a team.
    • By Shtabbbe
      I've had a game idea for a while, and I wanted to finally try to create it.
      Its a 2D open-world tile-based MMO. The concept is it is one world and multiplayer only, so everyone shares one world no matter region, platform, etc.
      I am having problems finding out what to use to start development, I tried Unity but saw some of the negatives and refrained and now im stuck, could anyone recommend some intermediate friendly 2D engines that can support what I am looking for? Preferably in languages that are or are somewhat like Java, C#, Python, JavaScript, Lua.
      Thanks for your help, im very new at this if you cant tell
    • By Zamma
      Hello!
      I'm doing an A.I. course at my university, and searching on internet i learned about the GOAP A.I. system. I found it really interesting and I would like to learn more about others techniques.  So I was wondering which A.I. system is used by the civilization saga (or at least in civilization IV/V/VI) but i'm not able to find anything about that. Does anyone know where i can find some infos or docs about A.I in Civ?
    • By rakshit Rao
      I'M interested in programming tools (For animation, UI, etc). Can anyone suggest me the resources where I can start learning or which technologies I need achive it.
       
      Thanks,
      Rakshit
    • By sausagejohnson
      Sounds
      This is our final part, 5 of a series on creating a game with the Orx Portable Game Engine. Part 1 is here, and part 4 is here.
      It's great that collecting the pickups work, but a silent game is pretty bland. It would be great to have a sound play whenever a pickup is collected.
      Start by configuring a sound:
       
      [PickupSound] Sound = pickup.ogg KeepInCache = true  
      Then as part of the collision detection in the PhysicsEventHandler function, we change the code to be:
       
      if (orxString_SearchString(recipientName, "PickupObject") != orxNULL) { orxObject_SetLifeTime(pstRecipientObject, 0); orxObject_AddSound(pstSenderObject, "PickupSound"); } if (orxString_SearchString(senderName, "PickupObject") != orxNULL) { orxObject_SetLifeTime(pstSenderObject, 0); orxObject_AddSound(pstRecipientObject, "PickupSound"); }  
      In code above, if the recipient is a pickup object, then use the orxObject_AddSound function to place our sound on the sender object. There's little point adding a sound to an object that is about to be deleted.
      And of course, if the pickup object is the sender, we add the sound to the recipient object. Also, the PickupSound that is added to the object, is the config section name we just defined in the config.
      Compile and run.
      Hit the pickups and a sound will play.
      You can also use sounds without code. There is an AppearSound section already available in the config.
      We can use this sound on the ufo when it first appears in the game.
      This is as simple as adding a SoundList property to the ufo:
       
      [UfoObject] Graphic = UfoGraphic Position = (0, 0, -0.1) Body = UfoBody AngularVelocity = 200 SoundList = SoundAppear  
      Re-run and a nice sound plays at the start of the game.
        Adding a score
      What's a game without a score? We need to earn points for every pickup that is collected.
      The great thing about Orx objects is that they don't have to contain a texture as a graphic. They can contain a font and text rendered to a graphic instead. This is perfect for making a score object.
      Start by adding some config for the ScoreObject:
       
      [ScoreObject] Graphic = ScoreTextGraphic Position = (-380, -280, 0)  
      Next, to add the ScoreTextGraphic section, which will not be a texture, but text instead:
       
      [ScoreTextGraphic] Text = ScoreText  
      Now to define the ScoreText which is the section that contains the text information:
       
      [ScoreText] String = 10000  
      The String property contains the actual text characters. This will be the default text when a ScoreObject instance is created in code.
      Let's now create an instance of the ScoreObject in the Init() function:
       
      orxObject_CreateFromConfig("ScoreObject");  
      So far, the Init() function should look like this:
       
      orxSTATUS orxFASTCALL Init() { orxVIEWPORT *viewport = orxViewport_CreateFromConfig("Viewport"); camera = orxViewport_GetCamera(viewport); orxObject_CreateFromConfig("BackgroundObject"); ufo = orxObject_CreateFromConfig("UfoObject"); orxCamera_SetParent(camera, ufo); orxObject_CreateFromConfig("PickupObjects"); orxObject_CreateFromConfig("ScoreObject"); orxClock_Register(orxClock_FindFirst(orx2F(-1.0f), orxCLOCK_TYPE_CORE), Update, orxNULL, orxMODULE_ID_MAIN, orxCLOCK_PRIORITY_NORMAL); orxEvent_AddHandler(orxEVENT_TYPE_PHYSICS, PhysicsEventHandler); return orxSTATUS_SUCCESS; }  
      Compile and run.
      There should be a score object in the top left hand corner displaying: 10000

      The score is pretty small. And it's fixed into the top left corner of the playfield. That's not really what we want.
      A score is an example of a User Interface (UI) element. It should be fixed in the same place on the screen. Not move around when the screen scrolls.
      The score should in fact, be fixed as a child to the Camera. Wherever the Camera goes, the score object should go with it.
      This can be achieved with the ParentCamera property, and then setting the position of the score relative to the camera's centre position:
       
      [ScoreObject] Graphic = ScoreTextGraphic Position = (-380, -280, 0) ParentCamera = Camera UseParentSpace = false  
      With these changes, we've stated that we want the Camera to be the parent of the ScoreObject. In other words, we want the ScoreObject to travel with the Camera and appear to be fixed on the screen.
      By saying that we don't want to UseParentSpace means that we want specify relative world coordinates from the centre of the camera. If we said yes, we'd have to specify coordinates in another system.
      And Position, of course, is the position relative to the center of the camera. In our case, moved to the top left corner position.
      Re-run and you'll see the score in much the same position as before, but when you move the ufo around, and the screen scrolls, the score object remains fixed in the same place.
      The only thing, it's still a little small. We can double its size using Scale:
       
      [ScoreObject] Graphic = ScoreTextGraphic Position = (-380, -280, 0) ParentCamera = Camera UseParentSpace = false Scale = 2.0 Smoothing = false Smoothing has been set to false so that when the text is scaled up, it will be sharp and pixellated rather than smoothed up which looks odd.
      All objects in our project are smooth be default due to:
       
      [Display] Smoothing = true: So we need to explicitly set the score to not smooth.
      Re-run. That looks a lot better.

      To actually make use of the score object, we will need a variable in code of type int to keep track of the score.
      Every clock cycle, we'll take that value and change the text on the ScoreObject.
      That is another cool feature of Orx text objects: the text can be changed any time, and the object will re-render.
      Finally, when the ufo collides with the pickup, and the pickup is destroyed, the score variable will be increased. The clock will pick up the variable value and set the score object.
      Begin by creating a score variable at the very top of the code:
       
      #include "orx.h" orxOBJECT *ufo; orxCAMERA *camera; int score = 0;  
      Change the comparison code inside the PhysicsEventHandler function to increase the score by 150 points every time a pickup is collected:
       
      if (orxString_SearchString(recipientName, "PickupObject") != orxNULL) { orxObject_SetLifeTime(pstRecipientObject, 0); orxObject_AddSound(pstSenderObject, "PickupSound"); score += 150; } if (orxString_SearchString(senderName, "PickupObject") != orxNULL) { orxObject_SetLifeTime(pstSenderObject, 0); orxObject_AddSound(pstRecipientObject, "PickupSound"); score += 150; }  
      Now we need a way to change the text of the score object. We declared the score object in the Init() function as:
       
      orxObject_CreateFromConfig("ScoreObject");  
      But we really need to create it using an orxOBJECT variable:
       
      scoreObject = orxObject_CreateFromConfig("ScoreObject");  
      And then declare the scoreObject at the top of the file:
       
      #include "orx.h" orxOBJECT *ufo; orxCAMERA *camera; orxOBJECT *scoreObject; int score = 0;  
      Now it is possible to update the scoreObject using our score variable. At the bottom of the Update() function, add the following code:
       
      if (scoreObject) { orxCHAR formattedScore[5]; orxString_Print(formattedScore, "%d", score); orxObject_SetTextString(scoreObject, formattedScore); }  
      First, the block will only execute if there is a valid scoreObject.
      If so, then create a 5 character string. Then print into the string with the score value, effectively converting an int into a string.
      Finally set the score text to the scoreObject using the orxObject_SetTextString function.
      Compile and Run.
      Move the ufo around and collect the pickups to increase the score 150 points at a time.
        Winning the game
      1200 is the maximum amount of points that can be awarded, and that will mean we've won the game.
      If we do win, we want a text label to appear above the ufo, saying “You win!”.
      Like the score object, we need to define a YouWinObject:
       
      [YouWinObject] Graphic = YouWinTextGraphic Position = (0, -60, 0.0) Scale = 2.0 Smoothing = false  
      Just like the camera, the YouWinObject is going to be parented to the ufo too. This will give the appearance that the YouWinObject is part of the ufo.
      The Scale is set to x2.
      The Position is set offset up in the y axis so that it appears above the ufo.
      Next, the actual YouWinTextGraphic:
       
      [YouWinTextGraphic] Text = YouWinText Pivot = center  
      And the text to render into the YouWinTextGraphic:
       
      [YouWinText] String = You Win!  
      We'll test it by creating an instance of the YouWinObject, putting it into a variable, and then parent it to the ufo in the Init() function:
       
      orxObject_CreateFromConfig("PickupObjects"); scoreObject = orxObject_CreateFromConfig("ScoreObject"); ufoYouWinTextObject = orxObject_CreateFromConfig("YouWinObject"); orxObject_SetParent(ufoYouWinTextObject, ufo);  
      Then the variable:
       
      #include "orx.h" orxOBJECT *ufo; orxCAMERA *camera; orxOBJECT *ufoYouWinTextObject; orxOBJECT *scoreObject; int score = 0;  
      Compile and Run.
      The “You win” text should appear above the ufo. Not bad, but the text is rotating with the ufo much like the camera was before.

      We can ignore the rotation from the parent on this object too:
       
      [YouWinObject] Graphic = YouWinTextGraphic Position = (0, -60, 0.0) Scale = 2.0 Smoothing = false IgnoreFromParent = rotation  
      Re-run. Interesting. It certainly isn't rotating with the ufo, but its position is still being taken from the ufo's rotation.

      We need to ignore this as well:
       
      [YouWinObject] Graphic = YouWinTextGraphic Position = (0, -60, 0.0) Scale = 2.0 Smoothing = false IgnoreFromParent = position.rotation rotation  
      Good that's working right.

      We want the “You Win!” to appear once all pickups are collected.
      The YouWinObject object on created on the screen when the game starts. But we don't want it to appear yet. Only when we win. Therefore, we need to disable the object immediately after it is created using the orxObject_Enable function:
       
      ufoYouWinTextObject = orxObject_CreateFromConfig("YouWinObject"); orxObject_SetParent(ufoYouWinTextObject, ufo); orxObject_Enable(ufoYouWinTextObject, orxFALSE);  
      Finally, all that is left to do is add a small check in the PhysicsEventHandler function to test the current score after each pickup collision:
       
      if (orxString_SearchString(recipientName, "PickupObject") != orxNULL) { orxObject_SetLifeTime(pstRecipientObject, 0); orxObject_AddSound(pstSenderObject, "PickupSound"); score += 150; } if (orxString_SearchString(senderName, "PickupObject") != orxNULL) { orxObject_SetLifeTime(pstSenderObject, 0); orxObject_AddSound(pstRecipientObject, "PickupSound"); score += 150; } if (orxObject_IsEnabled(ufoYouWinTextObject) == orxFALSE && score == 1200) { orxObject_Enable(ufoYouWinTextObject, orxTRUE); }  
      We are checking two things: that the ufoYouWinTextObject is not yet enabled using the orxObject_IsEnabled function, and if the score is 1200.
      If both conditions are met, enable the ufoYouWinTextObject.
      Compile and run.
      Move the ufo around and collect all the pickups. When all are picked up and 1200 is reached, the “You Win!” text should appear above the ufo signifying that the game is over and we have won.

      And that brings us to the end! We have created a simple and complete game with some configuration and minimal code.
      Congratulations!
      I hope you enjoyed working through making the ufo game using the Orx Portable Game Engine. Of course, there are many little extras you can add to give your game that little extra polish. So, for just a bit more eye candy, there a couple more sections that you can follow along with if you wish.
        Shadows
      There are many ways to do shadows. One method is to use shaders… though this method is a little beyond this simple guide.
      Another method, when making your graphics, would be to add an alpha shadow underneath. This is a good method if your object does not need to rotate or flip.
      The method I will show you in this chapter is to have a separate shadow object as a child of an object. And in order to remain independent of rotations, the children will ignore rotations from the parent.
      First a shadow graphic for the ufo, and one for the pickups:
       
      Save these both into the data/texture folder.
      Then create config for the ufo shadow:
       
      [UfoShadowGraphic] Texture = ufo-shadow.png Alpha = 0.3 Pivot = center  
      The only interesting part is the Alpha property. 0.1 would be almost completely see-through (or transparent), and 1.0 is not see-through at all, which is the regular default value for a graphic. 0.3 is fairly see-through.
       
      [UfoShadowObject] Graphic = UfoShadowGraphic Position = (20, 20, 0.05)  
      Set the Position a bit to the right, and downwards.
      Next, add the UfoShadowObject as a child of the UfoObject:
       
      [UfoObject] Graphic = UfoGraphic Position = (0,0, -0.1) Body = UfoBody AngularVelocity = 200 UseParentSpace = position SoundList = AppearSound ChildList = UfoShadowObject  
      Run the project.
      The shadow child is sitting properly behind the ufo but it rotates around the ufo, until it ends up at the bottom left which is not correct.

      We'll need to ignore the rotation from the parent:
       
      [UfoShadowObject] Graphic = UfoShadowGraphic Position = (20, 20, 0.05) IgnoreFromParent = position.rotation rotation  
      Not only do we need to ignore the rotation of ufo, we also need to ignore the rotation position of the ufo.
      Re-run and the shadow sits nice and stable to the bottom right of the ufo.

      Now to do the same with the pickup shadow:
       
      [PickupShadowGraphic] Texture = pickup-shadow.png Alpha = 0.3 Pivot = center [PickupShadowObject] Graphic = PickupShadowGraphic Position = (20, 20, 0.05) IgnoreFromParent = position.rotation  
      The only difference between this object and the ufo shadow, is that we want the pickup shadow to take the rotation value from the parent. But we do not want to take the position rotation.
      That way, the pickup shadow will remain in the bottom right of the pickup, but will rotate nicely in place.
      Now attach as a child to the pickup object:
       
      [PickupObject] Graphic = PickupGraphic FXList = RotateFX Body = PickupBody ChildList = PickupShadowObject  
      Re-run, and the shadows should all be working correctly.

      And that really is it this time. I hope you made it this far and that you enjoyed this series of articles on the Orx Portable Game Engine.
      If you like what you see and would like to try out a few more things with Orx, head over our learning wiki where you can follow more beginner guides, tutorials and examples.
      You can always get the latest news on Orx at the official website.
      If you need any help, you can get in touch with the community on gitter, or at the forum. They're a friendly helpful bunch over there, always ready to welcome newcomers and assist with any questions.
       
       
  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Participate in the game development conversation and more when you create an account on GameDev.net!

Sign me up!