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Yesindiedee

C++ Releasing closed source on Windows without looking suspicious

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Over the last week I have released my first prototype for free public download. Great...

However,

It has very quickly become clear that their is a trust issue surrounding releasing my work, and I understand the concern.

I have worked very hard to make the install process simple for the user. Just like games I would install myself, mine offers an installer which guides the user to install the prototype and ensures system dependencies are met. This brings the setup to a single .exe file that can be easily distributed and downloaded.

Here is the problem; although the game page gets attention, more than one person has indicated that they find deployment in this way to look suspicious. What's more, Windows also doesn't help- it too warns it's suspicious.

However, so far it appears that my release through itch.io (indie steam) is being trusted more, but I don't see much difference. Again, at the end of the day, itch is just installing the exe for the user, the only difference is that the user may only see a nice image and an install button through the itch app.

So, what would be a good way to release closed source software which inspires trust in people?

In the past I have had to use code signing for client work, but as far as I can see that just boils down to: If you pay some money, you become trusted. In my experience, there is no review of the code of any kind. Is it purely the alignment with a larger company that makes people trust the itch.io release over my direct download? How can an individual be trusted?

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19 minutes ago, Yesindiedee said:

I have worked very hard to make the install process simple for the user. Just like games I would install myself, mine offers an installer which guides the user to install the prototype and ensures system dependencies are met. This brings the setup to a single .exe file that can be easily distributed and downloaded.

Considering that your down loaders will be indie gamers, there is no need to pack the dependencies in the installer.

Instead have links to to dependencies on your page. This is how most indie developers work and is what people are use to.

 

You can use zip files if the game isn't that large. Installers are less trusted. You should result to a installer when your raw game is >500mb. Purchasing a trusted installer also helps.

Don't let your game try to download anything unless it's a online game.

 

That's the best I can think of the top of my head. Look around and see how other developers are doing it.

Edited by Scouting Ninja

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There is always going to be an exe around somewhere though, even if it's just in the zip file? do you think it comes down to anxiety surrounding single file exe downloads?

I currently use innosetup for the setup and as an indie you can imagine one of the issues I have is no money so purchasing stuff isn't really an option. Does money = trust?

 

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Just now, Yesindiedee said:

do you think it comes down to anxiety surrounding single file exe downloads?

Definitely. Most people will immediately discard any .exe that is just downloaded on it's own. Placing that same exe into a zip makes things more trusted.

It's because most virus and malware is a single exe. People have learned to fear it.

2 minutes ago, Yesindiedee said:

Does money = trust?

No.

Reputation = trust.

The installers you buy have a reputation. There are some installers that also have free versions.

You don't need money, you should just not copy the file sharing system that malware and virus use.

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I feel the exact same way when I see a single exe, however I feel that way with every exe so it looks like I wouldn't even download my own work.

If this is true it appears that single developers have lost power, and have become dependant on a reliance with middle men.

How could we get that power back without money being involved?

Scenario: I want to release code: I submit it for code review, I get sent a part of someone else's code to review and mine in turn is split and sent to other people submitting code for review. Once all parts of my code have been reviewed I get some sort of trusted status that the community can push as a recognised standard? No money involved, everybody equal?

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17 minutes ago, Yesindiedee said:

have become dependant on a reliance with middle men.

making a zip file doesn't need a middle man. You can make them yourself and the unpatented ones can be un-zipped by most computers. Or use a free zip system.

17 minutes ago, Yesindiedee said:

If this is true it appears that single developers have lost power

More like we have the power to use 3rd parties. Malware and virus developers work on there own out of legal concerns.

17 minutes ago, Yesindiedee said:

How could we get that power back without money being involved?

It depends on what you mean by money. Time = money.

If you had time you could make a way to distribute files. Build it's reputation and resolve the problem. That is what these installers mostly are, there even exists a view that don't reduce file size.

17 minutes ago, Yesindiedee said:

Scenario: I want to release code: I submit it for code review, I get sent a part of someone else's code to review and mine in turn is split and sent to other people submitting code for review. Once all parts of my code have been reviewed I get some sort of trusted status that the community can push as a recognised standard? No money involved, everybody equal?

You need to build or arrange the system, then you need to maintain it.

Nothing that takes work is free, because taking the time to do it is going to cost you.

Edited by Scouting Ninja

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5 minutes ago, Scouting Ninja said:

You need to build or arrange the system, then you need to maintain it.

Nothing that takes work is free, because taking the time to do it is going to cost you.

If the game development community saw value in this kind of system for creating trusted status for code, they would give their time for free to develop the system, Open Source. Then a system would be in place that would support the community as equals, irrespective of their finances.

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It was me first being suspicious!

There were 2 things at play here though

  1. I didn't realise the itch was not your game (never underestimate the stupidity of your audience ;) )
  2. You released no screenshots or video of your game, no tech requirements

Aside from warnings about unsigned software, as far as this kind of thing, it is all about reputation as the others say. The more screenshots / video / explanations / feedback you have, the more trust you get. With none of these, no one wants to risk their windows installation getting hosed.

This is particularly a problem with windows imo as the OS is hopeless at installation / uninstallation issues, so things are more likely to get borked. So zip files are better than install files, no registry hosing, you can see what you are getting / dependencies etc.

On a related note I've found I'm testing shedloads more software now I'm on linux and can sandbox windows stuff in WINE. A virtual machine would probably be good too. Also I'm testing plenty android stuff .. painless install / uninstall etc.

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1 hour ago, Yesindiedee said:

If the game development community saw value in this kind of system for creating trusted status for code, they would give their time for free to develop the system, Open Source. Then a system would be in place that would support the community as equals, irrespective of their finances.

I don't see that happening. Some individuals might be interested in working on something like that, but I don't think there's a unified, monolithic "game development community" in the sense that you mean and most people expect to get paid for their time - especially if they're indies and/or have families to feed. Game development is a business, after all. The people making stuff for release in their free time (probably a minority of developers due to the way most employee-studio contracts work) are generally doing it as a hobby and would rather work on their own game ideas than something comparatively boring and annoying to support like installation software. The "community" isn't just going to get together and collectively make something for free.

If you want this badly enough, then perhaps you should start the ball rolling yourself and try to get people interested in it.

Edited by Oberon_Command

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I had never heard of Itch a month ago :D Which is why I would prefer to not have to promote another service in order to distribute software.

9 minutes ago, lawnjelly said:

This is particularly a problem with windows imo as the OS is hopeless at installation / uninstallation issues, so things are more likely to get borked. So zip files are better than install files, no registry hosing, you can see what you are getting / dependencies etc.

I have seriously considered releasing android versions for this reason. Out of interest would you trust a native Linux version more than Windows?

So far I think I am going to go the zip route for my direct download option, it looks to imply the most trust. A shame it wont stop Windows popping up a scary malware warning until i pay for code signing.

12 minutes ago, lawnjelly said:

Aside from warnings about unsigned software, as far as this kind of thing, it is all about reputation as the others say. The more screenshots / video / explanations / feedback you have, the more trust you get. With none of these, no one wants to risk their windows installation getting hosed.

I have been thinking this also. Unfortunately the prototype I released doesn't lend itself to screenshots without spoilers. I am now creating a new prototype and have decided to create video development logs to show the progress of that development to try and create a transparent as possible process.

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