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meZmo

PS2 Emulators

13 posts in this topic

HOLD YER HORSES! No flames here please.. I know that "no computer is powerful enough to emulate the PS2" and "maybe in 3 or 4 years, but now, forget it!". But surely someone must be working seriously on PS2 emulators? Something that would allow us to code simple demos, showing triangles and cubes, running at 5-10 fps. I would kill (well, at least sell my grandma) for such an emulator. Anyone know any reliable resources? -meZ
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why would someone flame you. PC''s are fairly capable of emulating the PS2, albeit not at a playable level yet. it really depends on what you''re going for in the emulation. if you are trying to emulate everything down to the "T". i.e. perfect parallelism, pipeline stalls, cache, etc. then of course not. but with techniques like dynamic compilation, i don''t see why not. i have already completely emulated the base R4000 CPU and most of the vector unit instructions. will i continue to build a full blown emulator. probably, not. as i already do coding on the PS2.

To the vast majority of mankind, nothing is more agreeable than to escape the need for mental exertion... To most people, nothing is more troublesome than the effort of thinking.
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quote:
why would someone flame you?


..well, that''s usually what people do when the words "PS2" and "emulator" are mentioned in the same sentence.

I just wish someone would "just do it". Don''t wanna have to buy a new PS2 just for hobby development.
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meZmo, do what I am doing. Try and purchase the PS2 Linux dev kit when it comes out in the US. It was announced by Sony representatives, but no official release dates were give yet. It will cost about $200. Read my other PS2 Linux posts.

Edem Attiogbe
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meZmo, do what I am doing. Try and purchase the PS2 Linux dev kit when it comes out in the US. It was announced by Sony representatives, but no official release dates were give yet. It will cost about $200. Read my other PS2 Linux posts. Of course, if your a genious like jenova, you could engineer your own PS2 development tools(assemblers, compilers, etc.)

Edem Attiogbe
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meZmo, do what I am doing. Try and purchase the PS2 Linux dev kit when it comes out in the US. It was announced by Sony representatives, but no official release dates were give yet. It will cost about $200. Read my other PS2 Linux posts. Of course, if your a genius like jenova, you could engineer your own PS2 development tools(assemblers, compilers, etc.)

Edem Attiogbe
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yeah, it''s based on MIPS III but has some MIPS IV instructions, omits some standard MIPS instructions and has extended instructions. i.e. 128-bit data transfers and MMX type instructions.

To the vast majority of mankind, nothing is more agreeable than to escape the need for mental exertion... To most people, nothing is more troublesome than the effort of thinking.
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Oh, so can the Emotion Engine process 128 bits of information per cycle, meaning it is truly 128 bit? I find this surprising, because todays high end CPU''s, such as SGI''s R14000, Sun''s UltraSparc III, Intel''s Itanium, and Apple/IBM/Motorola''s upcomming PowerPC G5 process 64 bits if data per cycle. Or, is the Emotion Engine like the G4''s altivec, a.k.a velocity engine, which is not truly 128 bit? I thought it was the floating point units in the Emotion Engine that were 128 bit. Also, I heard that you could program the 2 64 bit integer units of the Emotion Engine in unison to basically act like one 128 bit unit. I am not sure.

Edem Attiogbe
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KwamiMatrix: $200 for the devkit + $300 for the ps2 + $50 shipping to norway + 24% sales tax = quite an expensive dev setup (for a single individual). :-(

That's why I want an emulator, even a poor one.

..now I suppose I could use the PS2 for PLAYING games aswell, but I don't really have time for that (and we have 2 at work .

Emu-me, please! :-)

-meZ



Edited by - meZmo on December 4, 2001 5:38:06 PM
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you can do 128-bit load/store from memory and parallel operations on 64/32/16/8-bit data (i.e. MMX). that''s correct, they use 2 64-bit ALU''s. the vector units also process 4 32-bit values per cycle (i.e. SIMD).

To the vast majority of mankind, nothing is more agreeable than to escape the need for mental exertion... To most people, nothing is more troublesome than the effort of thinking.
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I feel that the key to really pumping out performance from the PS2 lies in VU1 & VU0. 4 32bit data sets per cycle? Wow. Isn''t the G4''s Altivec like that?
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oh, and I see what you are saying meZmo. PS2 is expensive, but worth it. For the games and the software developement.

You know what jenova? I keep asking you questions. Apart from Arstechnica, do you know of any web sites that explain the PS2's architechture(especially the Emotion Engine) in good detail? An article at Arstechnica was really good on the PS2.

Edem Attiogbe

Edited by - KwamiMatrix on December 4, 2001 8:49:11 PM
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