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[RELEASED] Piano Music Vol. II - Solo Piano Music for uniquely Emotional, Sentimental, Melancholic and Immersive moods

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The Piano Music Vol. II pack focuses on solo piano music that is able to create a uniquely emotional, sentimental, melancholic and immersive atmosphere.

The pack includes 5 original tracks, all available as both full tracks and seamless loops so that you can very easily use them in your games.

Unity Asset Store link: https://www.assetstore.unity3d.com/en/?stay#!/content/109358
Unreal Marketplace link: https://www.unrealengine.com/marketplace/piano-music-vol-ii

A 20 seconds preview of each main track is available on Soundcloud:

 

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