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digitaldirt

RPG Games For Girls!!!

90 posts in this topic

sorry, I did not read all 4 pages but I had to get rid of this:

If anyone wants to attract women to CRPGs or computer games in general the game designers should stop to make these stereotypic blast away games. They need to go even farther: make games that are dont show you the limits of the game world every 5 minutes. When the player wants to wear a red carpet around his shoulders as a cape allow him to do so. When he wants to talk to the town folk dont force him to say the same 3 sentences again and again.

I dont think women''s behaviour when playing computer games is different from their normal behaviour. There are things they are attracted by, mostly social interaction. This needs to be part of the game - play it together with friends or other humans.

It''s like it is always: woman are much harder to satisfy than men. Give a man something to play with and he''ll be happy. Give the same thing to a girl and she''ll remember she already saw something better... ;-)

Jan Rehders
http://www.turtlegame.f2s.com - my 2D Platformer
Editors available now !
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quote:
Original post by cmdkeen
sorry, I did not read all 4 pages but I had to get rid of this:



If you did, you wouldn´t have had to.
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quote:
Original post by MadKeithV
We were getting so close to agreement, and then drifted off again. Sniff!


Sawwy, and I apologize for my previous harsh comments toward diodor.

quote:
Original post by Diodor
Aiming at computer illiterate people won't work very well for a game as complicated as a RPG (points at the thread title). I propose creating a game that's maybe hard to get into, but a lot more enjoyable afterwards. The way to do that is to add social interaction as _part_ of the gameplay. Girls like to talk, to phone around and to spend time in chatrooms. Creating a game that requires this kind of interaction for success will presumably create a much better experience for the girl players.


This is where I think it's wrong. From my experiences on browser, mud, and mmorpg games, girls sit around and chat mostly with one another about guess what, real life stuffs. Sure, they might organize an occational run on some mob but most of the time they sit in one place and chat for two even more hours straight, about what happen to them in real life. I just don't think the "game universe" would gain much benefit at all from the additional chat interface at all as it wouldn't draw the females in any closer toward the game.

quote:
Well, any game that has at least a screen full of numbers could be deemed overcomplicated. Also, any game that requires the player to _read_ more than 10 lines of text would scare away half the Windows users. Finally, any game that requires a player to remember more than one or three things (like quests, spells, locations to come back to, weapons, prices, skills, useful NPCs, monster weaknesses) is simply hard.


Oh come on, don't tell me you didn't know that women have a much longer memory spam than us males? Can you remember the date you and your gf first met? I'll bet she does. The first group of poeple that the game would drive off with it's complication (none physical control related stuffs) would be a male majority, not female.

quote:
Original post by cmdkeen
If anyone wants to attract women to CRPGs or computer games in general the game designers should stop to make these stereotypic blast away games. They need to go even farther: make games that are dont show you the limits of the game world every 5 minutes. When the player wants to wear a red carpet around his shoulders as a cape allow him to do so. When he wants to talk to the town folk dont force him to say the same 3 sentences again and again.


Okay, repetitive speech is one thing I think everyone would agree that's not needed. But wearing the red carpet around his shoulders? I don't think so. There is no point for adding this in except to please a few people and have the additional codes and art design. This is where UO went bad. Too many useless stuffs and not enough fun. If this is something half the gamers would never thought about trying, take it out.

Can't remember who said this: sometimes making a game is not about putting more stuffs in, it's about leaving the useless stuffs out and improve the previous design.

quote:
It's like it is always: woman are much harder to satisfy than men. Give a man something to play with and he'll be happy. Give the same thing to a girl and she'll remember she already saw something better... ;-)


Yea... like real life. I hate RPG Back to designing adventure I go.

Edited by - mooglez on December 11, 2001 9:56:01 PM
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Yes, It''s sad that there are not many girls playing computer games.

For many of them, games are for little kids/immature boys/nerds etc. And I''m not being sexist or whatever, I''ve heard it from girls more than I''d like. I don''t know who to blame about this, actually.

But it''s not just about computer games. There are a lot of girls I know of that play pencil-and-paper RPG''s. And you cannot really say they''re easy. Any kind of RPG will require a lot of reading, rules and so on. However, think about how you start playing an RPG: creating a character. That''s something girls can relate to. And there''s plenty of social interaction going on, and thinking.

Now, tell me how many girls play Magic: The Gathering? I met two today, and that''s all. They did have hardcore Magic players as boyfriends, though. I have some female friends that said that they wouldn''t play it because they didn''t understand it, or because it was boring. And they may be just right.

The main issue here is how to get girls to pay attention to computer games. They need first to bother looking at it. If they get this far, I hope the game doesn''t have big boobs or the like...

It''s an entirely different experience to play with girls. I still miss one I met playing Ultima Online. And yes, I know she was a girl, and not a guy in disguise. In fact, I believe I''ve become pretty proficient at telling if someone is a male or female, just by how they behave and (specially) how they talk. Not to mention that usually, girls are much more funny than guys

Gaiomard Dragon
-===(UDIC)===-
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quote:
This is where I think it''s wrong. From my experiences on browser, mud, and mmorpg games, girls sit around and chat mostly with one another about guess what, real life stuffs. Sure, they might organize an occational run on some mob but most of the time they sit in one place and chat for two even more hours straight, about what happen to them in real life. I just don''t think the "game universe" would gain much benefit at all from additional the additional chat interface at all as it wouldn''t draw the females in any closer toward the game.


I couldn''t explain this any better! However(back to UO I go) sometimes they don''t talk about real life, and just roleplay. And guess what, I believe they have an easier time roleplaying than we do.

quote:

Oh come on, don''t tell me you didn''t know that women have a much longer memory spam than us males? Can you remember the date you and your gf first met? I''ll bet she does. The first group of poeple that the game would drive off with it''s complication would be a male majority, not female.


Really, but girls would have to have a reason to learn all the stuff to begin with.

quote:
It''s like it is always: woman are much harder to satisfy than men. Give a man something to play with and he''ll be happy. Give the same thing to a girl and she''ll remember she already saw something better... ;-)


Yes, and it''s sometimes annoying


Gaiomard Dragon
-===(UDIC)===-
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Oh come on, don''t tell me you didn''t know that women have a much longer memory spam than us males? Can you remember the date you and your gf first met? I''ll bet she does.

Females are much much better at remembering things that don''t matter. However, try to find one who knows the entire dialogue of all the Star Wars movies!
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Hmm. Well, I played Magic before I had a boyfriend that did. I also had 2 other female friends and my sister that played Magic. None of us play any more, though, mostly because we were sickened by how the game was being marketed (that whole common, uncommon, rare scheme was idiotic in the first place - a deck should be one of every card in the set and some land) and because new cards weren''t coming out fast enough.

As for women remembering things better than guys... well, I doubt women actually have better memories. My guess is that women preferentially pay attention to certain types of info (stories and anything with emotional significance) and men preferentially pay attention to different types of info (factoids, soundbites, visual images) and naturally everyone remembers best what they paid the most attention to in the first place.

As for women chatting and playing pretend - I don''t currently have the free time to mud or play a MMORPG, but I always enjoyed a good elaborate game of pretend. IMO props are essential to a good game of cooperative pretend: some pretty toy animals or dolls or whatever to anchor your canception of the character to, and some handy props to be the foozles, money, tools, and luxuries (a sparkly shooter marble, a doll-sized necklace, some sticks, scraps of fabric...) oh and don''t forget some blocks or yarn to outline various buildings and territories. When I''m just imagining fiction by myself I don''t need props, but when you''re pretending cooperatively with someone else they''re very helpful for keeping track of everything. Of the girls I have watched play pretend, all of them preferred to control multiple characters and organize them into some kind of social structure (family, ruler and court, guild, army division, crew of a ship) and make them interact primarily with each other and only secondarily with other players'' characters. You can all plug that fact into your theories of mmorpg design. Guys that I observed usually preferred to control one hero-character and possibly a sidekick, only picking up control of an npc or badguy when necessary. Now, of the boys I observed, they were all 12 and under, so this may change with age, I''m not sure.
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I''m a guy and I have an equal share of all the stated male and female characteristics. I grew up with my mother, sister and grandmother, so I have no problem seeing things from the "other side". In this respect I get irritated when I''m stereotyped as the typical male, and it also confounds me as to what other peoples great mystery between the sexes is. I think too much time is spent trying to figure the other out as a seperate entity, rather than finding the shared qualities which are inherent in both.

Blah!

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Stereotypes are way to common in games, including RPGs. People spend too much time moaning and groaning about how they don''t understand the other gender. I find it just as easy to talk to girls and guys, it is not a gender thing, its an understanding of specific people, and of emotions.

One experience with a guy or a girl( or even two or three experiences) does not mean every guy or girl is like that. To target a specific gender is ridiculous because each person, whether guy or girl, is unique. Stereotypes in games do not target a gender, they more so omit the other.

My favorite games( to play and to code ) are RPGs, I know guys that wouldn''t touch them with a 10'' pole and I know girls that could die for them. When I program games I try to make a story that relates to common emotions. And if anyone wants to tell me that only guys get mad or violent, and only girls cry and get sad, then they don''t know many people and certainly not themself.
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Do games like Zork, Leisure Suit Larry, and King''s Quest count as RPGs? I''ve known a few women to sit down and play these. They''re style''s not like a lot of RPGs we see these days.

For games in general, I''ve noticed that if you''re at a party and there''s a group of people playing Nintendo or something, women get right ticked if you try to skip their turn.
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quote:
Original post by sunandshadow
Hmm. Well, I played Magic before I had a boyfriend that did. I also had 2 other female friends and my sister that played Magic. None of us play any more, though, mostly because we were sickened by how the game was being marketed (that whole common, uncommon, rare scheme was idiotic in the first place - a deck should be one of every card in the set and some land) and because new cards weren''t coming out fast enough.

Funny: I quit because new cards came out too fast. Surely if the marketing side of things sickened you, then the release of extra cards should have sickened you more, since a large part of the motivation for doing so was to make older cards obsolete and force you to buy more. I would have preferred expansions to have been less common, and for games to be won or lost on skill, not on how many of the latest expansion you bought.

[ MSVC Fixes | STL | SDL | Game AI | Sockets | C++ Faq Lite | Boost ]
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The games that I have seen draw the most appeal from the female populace have been MMRPGs, but also the older SNES games like ChronoTrigger, EarthBound, RoboTrek, Final Fantasy III, etc. RPGs have lost a certain "feel" that was present in these older titles, and I think that if a game were to capture that once again, it would do well. Just my opinion...

- Ghardoan
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my $.02.. the other night, during the movie previews before LOTR, I saw a commercial for that new MMORPG game.. errr.. umm... Everquest whatever number it is.

The girl behind me in the seat in the theatre said, ''nope''. Also tho I think it was due to showing pis$ ass blatantly poor polygons on a big screen, and they weren''t moving smoothly kinda choppy like either the frame rate didn''t agree or they were trying to do a slo-motion on it... don''t do it! Don''t we pay for the movies already? Why put in those dam @$!$@#$ commercials you get brainwashed with on tv everyday?!? @#$@ commercialism everywhere! aaahhhhhhh!!!

anyway that''s my ranting and raving for a week. I know it didn''t make sense but I don''t care.

l8a
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The big problem that I see with most RPGs is that there isn''t enough to do.

Sure, you go kill and stomp and help some king or other make the universe a place that''s safe for little babies to grow up in, but is that enough for anyone, let alone the female gamers? Not for me, that''s why I usually just finish the game and put it away. I usually don''t even buy the game, I borrow it from a friend.

Make me a game where I can influence any number of things, from who is king to how wonderful the world is for the little girl down the street who likes the boy next door and not only will I be happy, but I think that women would like the game a lot more.

Give us not only more game, but more things that we can do in the game and I think that everyone, not just men or women, but everyone would be happier.
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Actually I believe almost everyone on this network are programming games that themselves want to play. If I started a non commercial project I would want it to be something that I would enjoy playing myself. That´s why we need more girls in the bussiness so we can se what a game specificly made for girls, by girls, is all about. Still many of the girls I´ve seen playing games choose the more calm and non-violent games like backpacker and such. Thanks to some very immature players on the net, girls that wants to play online are met in very negative ways. Childish and sexistic jokes are tossed here and there and doésn´t at all create a very pleasant atmosphere for them. Well I guess the only help is more girls in the industry and a more mature male response.

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