Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Gezu

Need feedback on environment design

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Hi,

I'm creating 3D environment for our side-scroller platformer game Warriorb. I use Blender for creating props and UE4 as game engine. My aim is to create different looking and feeling area types while keeping the same art style. I go for something between stylized and realistic. I don't use much detail because I don't have much time for each area. I've attached some examples. If you have any tip on how to improve my scenes I would be glad to hear it!

AfterGate.jpg

Arcade.jpg

Sewer.jpg

 

PortalCave2.jpg

Workshop.jpg

 

ForlornForest2.jpg

Edited by Gezu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

Maybe it does not have much to do with what you ask for feedback, but I would like to know what the video game is about. to more or less acclimate and see if I can help you in something, besides that of giving feeling to the places, I think, that is more for the music, if it is true that the music has to rely on a nice visual section because it is there where everything is born but for that reason to be able to help you or give my opinion on how to improve or change something in the environments, which are already quite magnificent and special, maybe I can help something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First pic

Moonlight background

Moonlight reflection from water under bridge

More orange natural lights in the houses

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I must say your graphics look very good! I cannot offer anything in terms of changing visuals because certain looks are there depending the mood you're trying to portray to the end user. Great job! :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, NicolasCastrov said:

Maybe it does not have much to do with what you ask for feedback, but I would like to know what the video game is about. to more or less acclimate and see if I can help you in something, besides that of giving feeling to the places, I think, that is more for the music, if it is true that the music has to rely on a nice visual section because it is there where everything is born but for that reason to be able to help you or give my opinion on how to improve or change something in the environments, which are already quite magnificent and special, maybe I can help something.

Well, ok. Here is a really short summary: The protagonist is a spirit trapped inside a ball body. To regain his former self he needs to help a Wizard to get his lost daughter back. The story starts with comic/humorous elements which are turning into ironic and serious as the player advance and finds out the true story of the Wizard and the World which is about to end, and its inhabitants slowly loosing their sanity. The music mostly uses sad tones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well then they go from light tones to dark, it's like a half Victorian with medieval aspect. I think it's like that or I understood it. Correct me if I'm sick. I feel that if they are very well achieved environments, in addition to having a very good lighting. I repeat I am not an expert or anything. but if we are going to help a magician in our adventure in the videogame. I think a little more of magical aspects are missing. for example the environments from 2 to 4 I feel that they are perfect and go very well with the style that I think they want for the game. but to the others I feel that something magical is missing, something striking that awakens feels sensation of magic. So far that, and I would like to see the progress and how they go with the game. luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, NicolasCastrov said:

well then they go from light tones to dark, it's like a half Victorian with medieval aspect. I think it's like that or I understood it. Correct me if I'm sick. I feel that if they are very well achieved environments, in addition to having a very good lighting. I repeat I am not an expert or anything. but if we are going to help a magician in our adventure in the videogame. I think a little more of magical aspects are missing. for example the environments from 2 to 4 I feel that they are perfect and go very well with the style that I think they want for the game. but to the others I feel that something magical is missing, something striking that awakens feels sensation of magic. So far that, and I would like to see the progress and how they go with the game. luck.

Thank you! Btw you can see how the game goes on here or on twitter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 18.4.2018 at 5:51 PM, Gezu said:

My aim is to create different looking and feeling area types while keeping the same art style.

The first (a bit) and the last image (a lot) look different than the others, mainly because they lack shadows.

The first image could be fixed simply with more contrast (making dark regions darker).

The last image could be fixed with shadows for the trees, coming from the sun in the back ground.

Also first and last image seem to have no vignette effect, but the other 3 do.

But i do not say i like the 3 middle images more, here i would like to see more color bleeding instead just darkening. (You could achieve this by using more saturated / brighter colors for GI baking or in general, but then tone the image down to the desired dark appeal with post processing like tone mapping.)

The bridge in the first image looks too repetive to me - a second and different arc element would be nice for some variation. 

In general all looks good, but the video on your web page looks much better than the small screenshots in this post. This could indicate that you focus too much on high frequency details, and too less on low frequency overall variation / composition. If you think i'm right, this is something you can not fix quickly, more something to keep in mind for future work. Scaling down images is a good trick to detect this, and this just happened unintended because the forum displays small images.

Good work :)

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Wow thank you JoeJ! You wrote a lot of good ideas I can now think about and try. I was hoping for an answer like this. :D

Edited by Gezu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Advertisement
  • Advertisement
  • Popular Tags

  • Popular Now

  • Advertisement
  • Similar Content

    • By davejones
      I am having an issue with touch inputs on an iPad. I have a UI widget item on screen that I am trying to drag. When I test the game on a PC the widget item works correctly. When I try to drag the widget item on a touch screen (iPad) the position of the item is nowhere near my finger. So as I am dragging the item it doesn't follow my finger, however when I drag the item using a mouse on a PC the widget moves in the correct position. In project settings I have enabled the use mouse for touch option but the issue still persists. This has been set up in unreal engine 4 and I am trying to get the correct functionality for a tablet device. Any help would be much appreciated on how I would get the UI widget to follow my finger when I drag it. 



    • By Stalefish
      Automated builds are a pretty important tool in a game developer's toolbox. If you're only testing your Unreal-based game in the editor (even in standalone mode), you're in for a rude awakening when new bugs pop up in a shipping build that you've never encountered before. You also don't want to manually package your game from the editor every time you want to test said shipping build, or to distribute it to your testers (or Steam for that matter).
      Unreal already provides a pretty robust build system, and it's very easy to use it in combination with build automation tools. My build system of choice is  Gradle , since I use it pretty extensively in my backend Java and Scala work. It's pretty easy to learn, runs everywhere, and gives you a lot of powerful functionality right out of the gate. This won't be a Gradle tutorial necessarily, so you can familiarize yourself with how Gradle works via the documentation on their site.
      Primarily, I use Gradle to manage a version file in my game's Git repository, which is compiled into the game so that I have version information in Blueprint and C++ logic. I use that version to prevent out-of-date clients from connecting to newer servers, and having the version compiled in makes it a little more difficult for malicious clients to spoof that build number, as opposed to having it stored in one of the INI files. I also use Gradle to automate uploading my client build to Steam via the use of steamcmd.
      Unreal's command line build tool is known as the Unreal Automation Tool. Any time you package from the editor, or use the Unreal Frontend Tool, you're using UAT on the back end. Epic provides handy scripts in the Engine/Build/BatchFiles directory to make use of UAT from the command line, namely RunUAT.bat. Since it's just a batch file, I can call it from a Gradle build script very easily.
      Here's the Gradle task snippet I use to package and archive my client:
      task packageClientUAT(type: Exec) { workingDir = "[UnrealEngineDir]\\Engine\\Build\\BatchFiles" def projectDirSafe = project.projectDir.toString().replaceAll(/[\\]/) { m -> "\\\\" } def archiveDir = projectDirSafe + "\\\\Archive\\\\Client" def archiveDirFile = new File(archiveDir) if(!archiveDirFile.exists() && !archiveDirFile.mkdirs()) { throw new Exception("Could not create client archive directory.") } if(!new File(archiveDir + "\\\\WindowsClient").deleteDir()) { throw new Exception("Could not delete final client directory.") } commandLine "cmd", "/c", "RunUAT", "BuildCookRun", "-project=\"" + projectDirSafe + "\\\\[ProjectName].uproject\"", "-noP4", "-platform=Win64", "-clientconfig=Development", "-serverconfig=Development", "-cook", "-allmaps", "-build", "-stage", "-pak", "-archive", "-noeditor", "-archivedirectory=\"" + archiveDir + "\"" } My build.gradle file is in my project's directory, alongside the uproject file. This snippet will spit the packaged client out into [ProjectDir]\Archive\Client.
      For the versioning, I have two files that Gradle directly modifies. The first, a simple text file, just has a number in it. In my [ProjectName]\Source\[ProjectName] folder, I have a [ProjectName]Build.txt file with the current build number in it. Additionally, in that same folder, I have a C++ header file with the following in it:
      #pragma once #define [PROJECT]_MAJOR_VERSION 0 #define [PROJECT]_MINOR_VERSION 1 #define [PROJECT]_BUILD_NUMBER ### #define [PROJECT]_BUILD_STAGE "Pre-Alpha" Here's my Gradle task that increments the build number in that text file, and then replaces the value in the header file:
      task incrementVersion { doLast { def version = 0 def ProjectName = "[ProjectName]" def vfile = new File("Source\\" + ProjectName + "\\" + ProjectName + "Build.txt") if(vfile.exists()) { String versionContents = vfile.text version = Integer.parseInt(versionContents) } version += 1 vfile.text = version vfile = new File("Source\\" + ProjectName + "\\" + ProjectName + "Version.h") if(vfile.exists()) { String pname = ProjectName.toUpperCase() String versionContents = vfile.text versionContents = versionContents.replaceAll(/_BUILD_NUMBER ([0-9]+)/) { m -> "_BUILD_NUMBER " + version } vfile.text = versionContents } } } I manually edit the major and minor versions and the build stage as needed, since they don't need to update with every build. You can include that header into any C++ file that needs to know the build number, and I also have a few static methods in my game's Blueprint static library that wrap them so I can get the version numbers in Blueprint.
      I also have some tasks for automatically checking those files into the Git repository and committing them:
      task prepareVersion(type: Exec) { workingDir = project.projectDir.toString() commandLine "cmd", "/c", "git", "reset" } task stageVersion(type: Exec, dependsOn: prepareVersion) { workingDir = project.projectDir.toString() commandLine "cmd", "/c", "git", "add", project.projectDir.toString() + "\\Source\\[ProjectName]\\[ProjectName]Build.txt", project.projectDir.toString() + "\\Source\\[ProjectName]\\[ProjectName]Version.h" } task commitVersion(type: Exec, dependsOn: stageVersion) { workingDir = project.projectDir.toString() commandLine "cmd", "/c", "git", "commit", "-m", "\"Incrementing [ProjectName] version\"" } And here's the task I use to actually push it to Steam:
      task pushBuildSteam(type: Exec) { doFirst { println "Pushing build to Steam..." } workingDir = "[SteamworksDir]\\sdk\\tools\\ContentBuilder" commandLine "cmd", "/c", "builder\\steamcmd.exe", "+set_steam_guard_code", "[steam_guard_code]", "+login", "\"[username]\"", "\"[password]\"", "+run_app_build", "..\\scripts\\[CorrectVDFFile].vdf", "+quit" } You can also spit out a generated VDF file with the build number in the build's description so that it'll show up in SteamPipe. I have a single Gradle task I run that increments the build number, checks in those version files, packages both the client and server, and then uploads the packaged client to Steam. Another great thing about Gradle is that Jenkins has a solid plugin for it, so you can use Jenkins to set up a nice continuous integration pipeline for your game to push builds out regularly, which you absolutely should do if you're working with a team.
    • By MoreLion
      Hey all! we are a team of 7 looking for a game designer, im a game designer but need help as i am doing multiple things at once, the game is being developed in UE4.
      the game is a futuristic action adventure game where you play as a 21 year old female who has woken up in a simulation not knowing who or where she is, but when all is unfolding the simulation gets hacked leaving eveline with no choice but to escape before she is killed inside the simulation.
      we are also looking for other members aswell wether you be a animator a ue4 game developer or that just email me below.
      if interested email liondude12@gmail.com
    • By Lode
      Hi,
      I'd like to present LogicEmu, a new logic circuit emulator working in the browser:
      http://lodev.org/logicemu/
      It's somewhat different from most logic circuit emulators, because it's cell based and internally with 2D ASCII diagrams, and it comes with a huge ton of circuits prebuilt which can be immediately selected from dropdowns to try out all kinds of cool stuff!
      How is it related to gamedev? It's an educational game, it's also vaguely like minecraft redstone, and may be useful for developing/testing/verifying such circuitry engines in games. It's open source on github to see how it works.
      Please let me know any feedback. Suggestions, bugs, overall impressions, critique, ... are all super welcome
      Thanks!

    • By nihitori
      This is the official Sales topic for the acclaimed Colossal Game Music Collection (100+ five-star ratings on the Unity Asset Store) and its Lite version, the Essential Game Music Collection.

      Updates will be made here every time a sale is taking place on either the Unity Asset Store or the Unreal Engine Marketplace.

      Current Sales:

      Version 2.0 Intro Sale on the Unreal Engine Marketplace -

      - Colossal Game Music Collection at 50% OFF - https://www.unrealengine.com/marketplace/colossal-game-music-collection


      Please feel free to post here any questions you might have about either the sales or the collection itself.
  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Participate in the game development conversation and more when you create an account on GameDev.net!

Sign me up!