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GalacticCrew

Developing my own game engine vs. using a commercial game engine

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I could think of Horizon Zero Dawn. My super mega favorite game so far. But it still has bad looking water surfaces. So not even it is perfect in my point of view. Even the demos big engines provide have bad looking artifacts in them.

I believe in the general rule: "the less time it takes to code the more time it takes to execute and vice versa"

Maybe I am wrong, but i believe that dropping items to a sandbox and programing one's own engine will differ drastically in performance.

Saying all that, i am not going to write my own game engine..noooo.. too time consuming!
 

31 minutes ago, mr_tawan said:

Whenever I draw or paint something, when bad things happen, I think "sh*t, I need to undo. Oh wait, this a the real paper!". Quite often I have to throw away the paper and start it all over again.

https://choualbox.com/Img/139880664169.jpg

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6 minutes ago, NikiTo said:

I believe in the general rule: "the less time it takes to code the more time it takes to execute and vice versa"

Maybe I am wrong, but i believe that dropping items to a sandbox and programing one's own engine will differ drastically in performance.

Saying all that, i am not going to write my own game engine..noooo.. too time consuming!

As I wrote earlier on page 1:

Quote

If I had quit my last job to become a self-employed video game developer without having worked on my game engine for two years, I'd most probably use Unity right now. Otherwise, I had to work for many months on an engine without getting paid

I would not even think about creating a game engine, if I'd found my company right now without having anything. However, I had an engine framework with quite some features and I already have a commercial video game right now. So I do have a great foundation, I think. The question for me is, if I should continue developing it (water, smoke and fire effects are needed for the next projects), or if you should switch to another engine.

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2 minutes ago, GalacticCrew said:

The question for me is, if I should continue developing it

For a small team, it is very possible to program a game engine in time. I mean two programmers or three are enough.

But everypony should focus on a specific task. A pony should code the rendering, other the AI and animations, other the Physics...

To find good project buddies is very hard.

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It takes as long as programming your own basic engine that you understand then to get to the bottom of a available game engine.

If you dont know what a game engine is you still need to get started with avaiable engine to learn about game engines in general.

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27 minutes ago, the incredible smoker said:

It takes as long as programming your own basic engine that you understand then to get to the bottom of a available game engine.

If you dont know what a game engine is you still need to get started with avaiable engine to learn about game engines in general.

I worked with some game engines like OGRE during my studies and we did several theoretical architecture approaches during my classes. Some years have passed since then, but this knowledge is still in my head. Creating the basic stuff is no problem. I wouldn't even consider using Unity for 2D stuff (like most people did at Play NYC), but some advanced 3D techniques take time.

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Engine is not exactly "wrapper around DX/GL". Engine is all infrastructure around art/code/design/build/platforms and other-other. In 99.9% of "I develop my own engine" it's mean just wrapper for lua+DX/GL+"60fps on top PC". If you code a game - you finish it. If you code "an engine" - you will code it forever. If you want get theoretical background about tech and pipelines, you can get it just from books like Realtime Rendering 3rd/4th edition, Geometric Tools for Computer Graphics, Game Engine Architecture by Jason Gregory. It's waste of time to code your own engine. If you can't bring yourself to commercial production.

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Somebody mentioned the possibility of the third party engines to change their therms or to discontinue.
When you work with a third party engine, you are constantly eating from the hand of the makers. And constantly asking them to give you food(knowledge) or to fix bugs.

chicken-treats1.jpg

Just now, i was googling for something unrelated and found an user posting a bug and the developer telling him: "I decided this function will not take care of checking the input anymore". He decided. And your app breaks. And you have to fix it all because somebody decided. I have even heard that developers often change the product just because they want to keep selling support, like some kind of extortion.

I try to eat only from the hand of Microsoft for now.

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5 minutes ago, Makusik Fedakusik said:

Engine is not exactly "wrapper around DX/GL". Engine is all infrastructure around art/code/design/build/platforms and other-other. In 99.9% of "I develop my own engine" it's mean just wrapper for lua+DX/GL+"60fps on top PC". If you code a game - you finish it. If you code "an engine" - you will code it forever. If you want get theoretical background about tech and pipelines, you can get it just from books like Realtime Rendering 3rd/4th edition, Geometric Tools for Computer Graphics, Game Engine Architecture by Jason Gregory. It's waste of time to code your own engine. If you can't bring yourself to commercial production.

I did not just develop a wrapper around DX. I use SharpDX as wrapper for DirectX 11 in C#, but my game engine is a real game engine not just a wrapper. Otherwise, I could not use for future products! If I continue developing my engine, it means to continue adding features that can be used in any following game project - like water, smoke and fire in my case.

I don't agree with your last statement. If you do it for learning something new, it is great. It is also an amazing exercise.

3 minutes ago, NikiTo said:

Somebody mentioned the possibility of the third party engines to change their therms or to discontinue.
When you work with a third party engine, you are constantly eating from the hand of the makers. And constantly asking them to give you food(knowledge) or to fix bugs.

Yeah, that was me 🙂 That's one point of my "Con" list against using Unity.

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14 hours ago, Hodgman said:

Also known as: people who don't realize that digital painting takes the same amount of talent and effort...

Not only that, but while they are both art, they are not and do not produce the same thing nor use the same skills. Just because the term, painting, is used - that does not mean they are directly comparable - the way they have been in this thread. As an experienced painter that went to art school for a while, shameless plug: https://pixels.com/artists/nicholas+komsa

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The thing is you also build a level edittor if you have a game engine, also takes time.

 

And its true you eat out of the programmers hands, because you are not allowed to change anything in the engine.

A good engine would allow you to change and sell whatever you like without charge, and also not hidden in ".DLL" files so you can edit any code.

 

I also seen/heard that you also can compile for mac on a windows machine, that is one of the things the engines have : cross platform compatibility.

I would love to compile my windows game so it works on any computer from game console to mac.

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