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El Praso

Orchestral/Cinematic Music Composition (looking for feedback)

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Hi El Praso - 

I edited your post because the Music and Sound forum is for discussion, getting feedback and providing tips/tutorials/etc. It's not for soliciting work. Since you did ask for feedback/critique in your post - I just took out the first bit where you were asking for game audio work. Please feel free to check out the Careers section where we have hobbyist and paid work and you can advertise yourself there. 

Reach out if you have any questions. 

Thanks!

Nate

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pretty balanced mix. I think you should have a bit reverb in there. Piano sounds too quantized. Horror music isn't something that comes to my mind when listening.

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I agree, the label horror music doesn't seem to fit the music you've presented here. Perhaps a certain kind of game with a somewhat spooky atmosphere but not true horror... like an FPS with zombies. But when you consider real hallmarks of video game horror like Silent Hill or Resident Evil - this feels like a different style. This feels more like Ghost n' Goblins. More action oriented instead of creating suspense, which so many horror film OST do well. I hope that makes sense. 

Compare your music to The Ring - This is Going to Hurt with the tension and unease the music portrays. And that ragged, uneven cello playing and how creepy - getting right underneath your skin. 

Even less horror but more mystery in the Sixth Sense soundtrack: 

Even the songs that have more groove still have a bit more tension and leave more space. Like this cue in Silent Hill 3 OST: 
 

And some of it doesn't even have to really resemble "music" like much of the original Silent Hill OST does: 

Outside of the game, it's really hard to even listen to. But while in the game, it makes the experience so complete and creepy. It works beautifully. 

My advice is to spend a bit more time studying horror OST for both films and games and seeing if that's truly the kind of label and music you want to create. If not - that's totally fine! Labeling your music effective is highly important! If you get off from that by too much it can set up poor expectations of possible clients or even poor communication with current clients. I hope that helps. 

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Thanks for your feedback men. I didnt know, that i mislead about the genre.

"Orchestral/Cinematic Music Composition" would be better ?

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Like laurikoivisto writes the balance of the mixes are pretty good and I think you have a good ear for composition. Also mentioned is the heavy quantization of the piano which could benefit from some automation as well. The dynamics between the different sections and transitions between them are great. Listening to "Vlad" you hear a sudden volume bump from the viola that could use a compressor or a bit of automation to smooth it out an make the strings in general have more dynamics to make it sound less static. Nice vibe overall!

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I can't help somehow loving your stuff, even though this kind of music is usually not my style.

I really like your compositions. They are creative, original and feel well-crafted. You seem to have a feeling for how the instruments work and how to use them. So guts and brain seem to work together, here :)

What you'll really have to work on is your mastering. First thing to note is that you use way too much compression on almost everything. There are a few parts in almost every piece that crack in even my best headphones. I can't tell the exact reason for the crack and the high compression (might be true compression, but also amplifying equalization, gain, distortion or pure volume), but you'll know what I mean. Also, if you're using multi-band compression, try adjusting the bands a bit differently. For example, the bass band usually doesn't surpass 120Hz. You can also safely cut everything below 20 as it'll come out as only dirty rumble. What you want is a defined and defining bass.

The second thing is your stereo balancing. On the one hand, try to be a little more excentric (literally xD) and make more use of all the stereo space you have available. You've already experimented with panning and stereo-separation, mostly putting the wheels all-up. Try out the spaces in-between, try out more precise stereo separation or phase inversion (delay can do a lot, too). It'll make your mixes so much richer. On the other hand, try to put everything to mono that is of thin texture or otherwise doesn't need to occupy as such space in the stereo spectrum as they do now. This will be especially impactful for your basses that will benefit from this by sounding much more distinct and punchy.

Believe me, learn your mastering and your already awesome compositions will learn to shine :)

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ptietz : wow man, i am wondered about your feedback. Thank you for taking time. :)

Edited by El Praso

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