Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Amperian

Programming portfolio and resume feedback

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone. I have recently been applying for various entry level game programming jobs, but have not so much as heard back from most of the companies. I was wondering if I could get some feedback on my resume and programming portfolio, in case they are the reason I'm not hearing back from companies. 

My resume can be found on my linkedin profile at https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonah-brooks-16b49159/ (I've also attached it to this post)

And my portfolio can be found at https://amperian.itch.io with source code at https://github.com/JonahBrooks

I've searched the forums for other people asking for portfolio feedback and incorporated most of the suggestions they were given. Would it be significantly better if I made a website with code snippets and videos, or is my current approach more of what employers are looking for? Also, judging by my resume and portfolio, do I even have enough experience for an entry level position, or should I wait until I've made a few more games on my own? Finally, should I aim for self-publishing something on Google Play and/or Steam, or just stick with itch.io demos for my portfolio?

Thank you for your time in reading this and for any feedback you may give. 

Jonah_Brooks_Resume.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

The pictures and date bars are unexpected. I'd cut them. Use regular dates in the text.

Cut "references on request" and the "interests" since none of those will help getting the job.

Remove the skills section, incorporate those keywords in the places you've actually used them.  This should reduce your resume to a single page, which is what is expected for a recent graduate.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the input! I have updated my resume to be 1 page, and incorporated the rest of your advice as well. It's a lot more concise now. 

I'm still thinking of making a website with code snippets and links to the itch.io games instead of linking to itch.io and github. I've heard videos demonstrating the games is a good idea, so I might include those as well.

Thanks for your time and input.

Jonah_Brooks_Resume.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks good to me. To make it reach the end of the page you might add an extra line of what you did on some of those projects, but if I was in Oregon and hiring, that is enough to pique my interest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I were you, I'd expanded the github into the url like https://github.com/JonahBrooks in the cv. The reason is while most people know the symbol, there are still some people that's not familiar with it and will find difficulties looking for your repos in github.

It's probably not necessary in the states though... And those who find it relevance would know how to look for the repos anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome. Thanks guys! And I'll be sure to do that mr_tawan. The font size does make the github icon a bit hard to see, and it's always better safe than sorry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, mr_tawan said:

The reason is while most people know the symbol, there are still some people that's not familiar with it and will find difficulties looking for your repos in github.

And not only that, recruiters will be able to click directly on the link while going threw the CV instead of doing copy / paste, go to google to search for github (and other websites) main address, then append that to the resulted link, which might fail if they forgot to remove for example the /home or so, then give up because they have many other CV to see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe it's not important for most people, but your github profile shows "0 contributions in the last year".
It just ... doesn't feel like these are recent projects or something you are activly working on at the moment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What if somebody doesn't share code? I rarely make my code public. Nowadays in programming, there are many ways to do the same thing(OOP is not exact science) and people can always disagree with the way it is coded.

Plus, i have been told that recruiters never read the code.

I would gladly show my code on an interview, but i don't like to make it public on the internet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, NikiTo said:

What if somebody doesn't share code?

It depends on the job you are applying for. If you have previous work experience and a someone can confirm that you did x,y and z already in your life. That's okay, you are established at this point and if you aren't applying for a position far above your current one, no one is really going to question that.


But if you try to land you first job everything (good) you can show puts you ahead of the competition. This doen't have to be source code (I mean, no one really reads all the github repositories anyway), but just something you have done. In your free time, in school, anything that sets you part from the other hundred people wanting that job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!