Jump to content
  • Advertisement
FredHicks

From Uni To Remote Developer

Recommended Posts

I am finishing up my Game Programming and Design BS and am excited to start working in the field.  My biggest concern right now is that I live in a city with almost zero game studios and will be here for a while longer as me and my family have just bought our first house a couple years ago.  We do plan on moving in the future just for the purpose of change and experiencing something new and my girlfriend wants to move somewhere I can at least have opportunities to work in, but for now we are staying here while she finishes up her masters program.  What I am curious about is how to go about trying to get into the industry as a remote developer.  I am interested in any kind of work in the field to start off as I have been working on many different areas of game development since I was a kid in the early 90's but have finally decided to go for it in a serious way.  I guess I'm just looking for some advice and harsh reality checks about breaking into this highly competitive field as a remote developer.  I am new to the forums as well, so I hope I didn't break any rules I missed with this post.

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
4 hours ago, FredHicks said:

I'm just looking for some advice and harsh reality checks about breaking into this highly competitive field as a remote developer.

Any remote work you find as a raw college grad is likely to be unpaid. My advice is get a job, and look for remote work on the side. Don't move to a game hotbed until you've saved up enough money to tide you over while job-hunting in the new location. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Game jobs are relatively rare, and breaking in is difficult due to the few openings for raw beginners. Remote work is relatively rare.  I have known a few game developers who were able to work remotely, but they are a single digit number, versus over a thousand in-office developers.  They exist, but they are extremely rare, and usually started with strong connections to the studios before becoming remote workers.

As a fresh college graduate a company will not be paying for relocation or allowing remote work unless there are some unusual circumstances, like you developed your own amazing game as a senior project or something that gets you recruited specifically.

Hiring a worker without industry experience is a big risk for a company.  There are plenty of people local to the company that they can take that risk with, they won't want to add the risk of a remote worker on top of the risk of an industry beginner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are studios that hire remote developers to do the core of their development. As frob mentioned, it's a high risk, but there are ways that studios can work around it.

There are a few things to keep in mind:

1. As a remote developer, you will probably not be paid anywhere near a local on-site full time employee.

2. If you have not worked on game projects before you apply to join a company, as a fresh graduate, it's very difficult to land a job. Let alone a remote one. You will want to gain some real experience first, so volunteer your work until you get something worthwhile under your belt.

3. High-end consultants DO get paid pretty well, but you need to be an expert in the right niche. This, however, will unlikely be the case if you are a fresh grad.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!