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nizaryos

How should i learn c++ in unreal engine 4

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Hi

i am learning unreal engine 4 and want to get into c++ in UE4 but i dont know where to start and i dont have any programming background

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Hello!

You should be able to make games with Unreal without the need for programming( thats word around the campfire ) and that could give you breathing room to learn programming on the side...

The road to C++ is tackled in many ways, but if I were to start all over again...

1) Learn C first. Its smaller and is the most fundamental language you could pick as a first choice.

2) Learn to compile and build C( and C++ programs ) using a text editor, a command line and automate your "builds" with a Makefile. ***

3) When you are ready to tackle OOP( "Objected Orientated Programming" ) then progress to C++.

...although C is easier than C++ to learn, it requires patience and discipline( other languages have "garbage collectors" but thats a topic for later time ).  In other words, don't try to rush it.

 

Best of luck!😎

 

***  I personally have a very old Linux laptop for the purpose of practicing C/C++. This is because Ubuntu has the GNU toolchain preinstalled( contains compilers, linker etc ) and also provides a nice command line ready to use "out of the box".  There is obviously a similar setup for Windows( Mingw ) but it does involve a bit of work to get up and running which might be intimidating for the complete beginner.  This is merely a suggestion.

Edited by Anri

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58 minutes ago, Anri said:

Hello!

You should be able to make games with Unreal without the need for programming( thats word around the campfire ) and that could give you breathing room to learn programming on the side...

The road to C++ is tackled in many ways, but if I were to start all over again...

1) Learn C first. Its smaller and is the most fundamental language you could pick as a first choice.

2) Learn to compile and build C( and C++ programs ) using a text editor, a command line and automate your "builds" with a Makefile. ***

3) When you are ready to tackle OOP( "Objected Orientated Programming" ) then progress to C++.

...although C is easier than C++ to learn, it requires patience and discipline( other languages have "garbage collectors" but thats a topic for later time ).  In other words, don't try to rush it.

 

Best of luck!😎

 

***  I personally have a very old Linux laptop for the purpose of practicing C/C++. This is because Ubuntu has the GNU toolchain preinstalled( contains compilers, linker etc ) and also provides a nice command line ready to use "out of the box".  There is obviously a similar setup for Windows( Mingw ) but it does involve a bit of work to get up and running which might be intimidating for the complete beginner.  This is merely a suggestion.

Alright thank you for replying, can you plz send me links to tutorials or books that are the best for a total beginner 

1 hour ago, fleabay said:

This is one of the better tutorials on Udemy so I've been told. It starts you out with 6 hours of basic C++ before working in the engine. It is a huge Kickstarter backed project and is currently being updated and expanded.

https://www.udemy.com/unrealcourse/

or

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/bentristem/learn-to-make-video-games-unreal-developer-course

ll check this out thanks

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Nizaryos, it would help to know what OS you are running on...

To get up and running fast with C/C++ you could just install Code::Blocks and google for a relevent tutorial.  CB is available for both Windows and Linux. Hmm...this will get you started...

Books...hmm.  I personally learned from an old book called "Teach yourself C in 21 Days"( where has all the time gone??? ) but there are obviously more modern and improved books out there.  The problem I've seen over the years was that almost every book on the market only has a page or two about how to compile using command line. However, I did flick through one recently that covered GNU and Makefiles. If memory serves me correctly, it was "C in a Nutshell".

The reason I place an emphasis on command line compiling is due to IDEs( such as Visual Studio or Code::Blocks ) hiding the build process from the beginner. Basically, you'll happily follow a book and learn the syntax of the language but when it comes time to add other files, or even game libraries, you'll encounter unexpected errors such as "unresolved external".  Then you'll ask around online and be met with "did you even bother to read the compiler instructions?", which is a bit unfair as most books don't cover such things!

The trick to learning C or C++ is to learn both the language and build process at the same time so you dont have to suffer that. It will require more effort than using an IDE and clicking on "RUN" in the menu, but ultimately you will be glad that you did.

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If you’re wanting to learn unreal engine start out by learning blueprints. It’s much friendlier than C++, and will be easier to learn.

Youll still need to know the basics of programming eg. Flow control, loops and variables plus the basics of linear algebra such as vectors. You can’t really make anything without knowledge of both.

Its not true that you can use unreal to make a game in ue4 with no programming experience as there’s a basic expected level needed.

Good luck!

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Yes thats what i wanted i need to know the basics of programming but didn't know how to start or what should i do

i use maya and cinema4d but for animation and modeling no coding but people keep telling me learn to code

 

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9 hours ago, Brain said:

If you’re wanting to learn unreal engine start out by learning blueprints. It’s much friendlier than C++, and will be easier to learn.

Considering our friend has a 3D art background, a visual-node systems seems a better fit.  In your opinion, would Blueprints be enough to make a game in Unreal?

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