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Pasty Is Tasty

Experienced producer (outside of entertainment industry) looking for feedback on portfolio/resume

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I've been employed in the Serious Games industry for 6 years and I've been looking to move over to my life's passion, games for entertainment. That does come with a bit of a criteria that I need to have some admiration for the product being made before I apply to a studio. I expect to be taking both a cut in pay and an increase in hours from my current job, so the trade-off in my mind is that I'll be making something more interesting than what I currently make. To that end, I've been applying to jobs here and there for two years with little success, getting only a handful of interviews and no offers. I'm usually applying to mid-level producer roles. I'm searching everywhere in the US, with some willingness to go abroad.

My Portfolio and Resume are here. My cover letters are often custom but tend to stress variety of experience, collaborative mindset, and cultural fit (when known). I hope you guys can help point out some deficits or red flags I may have. My personal best guess at how to improve is that I simply need to be applying to more jobs (or looking longer) than I currently am. Networking would be number two, but I'm struggling as to how best to go about that when I'm not looking for an entry-level role and I'm on the east coast. Previous efforts have not felt productive, with meet-ups generally resulting in juniors hitting me up for work rather than the other way around.

I'm very grateful to anyone who can provide some useful info for me.

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looks fine over all, 

the only thing that jumps out at me is there are no months for your dates,, just years. 

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I dislike the "skills" section in resumes because they are completely out of context. List the keywords in actual projects instead.  For example, the skill "Proven coordinator. Agile and Waterfall management experience." by itself it is meaningless. Was that three months with a team of two people, or four years over a group of fifty?  You list "Art" as a skill, along with Blender, Photoshop, Illustrator, and Flash, but nothing else on the page says you actually used them, apart from the words "freelance artist" for four years which overlapped two real jobs as programmer, which has a lot of negative implications for me.

Reading it over, I can't see you're applying for or the direction you want your career to follow.  Producer, I assume? Say so, right at the top, that you're looking for a work as a producer, or designer, or technical director, or whatever. As it is, I see several years of work experience as a programmer, claimed non-work experience as an artist, an animator, a designer, a tester, and a general consultant, with a degree in civil engineering, combined implying you may not have any strong skills.

Finally, "Organized company Smash Bros. league" generally isn't a notable achievement for a resume.

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I appreciate the frank feedback, @frob. Can you elaborate on the negative implications of the freelance art listing? Everything in that section was work I did on top of a full time job, which I had hoped was clear.

As a general update, I have been getting more responses lately. It could be that the industry is a more in need of producers right now than during my previous attempts.

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In many job applications I've seen, "freelance" is used as a cover for "some buddies and I did a hobby project". Because you only have the name of a company with no details to what you actually did, a quick review won't see it.

The document can overcome that the same way as the general skills section: include details of what you actually did.  Instead of just "Company - Animator, year", or "Company - Game design consultant, year", list what you actually did.  "Company, game, job title, year.  Created animations for 47 creature types with a variety of walking, running, attacking, defending, dying, and similar animations, using Maya and in-house tools."   With that someone considering you for a job doesn't need to look up the company, or guess at how big or small your role was, nor do they need to guess your skill level at using the tools.

 

The job application and the resume are often compared to dating and flirting: you want to show off enough to get attention, but leave enough hidden that they want to know more. 

What you reveal should generally be explicit, with names and numbers. Give them enough that they say "Wow, we have to hire this person, look at what they did!"  Few employers will bother to follow your hyperlinks nor look up your projects, so you've got to tell them directly.

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