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Can I still make it?

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Hi, I''m kinda new to OGL and 3D programming in general. And after reading several posts about 11-14 year olds making all kind of cool stuff, I wonder if there is still a chance for me to ever become a game programmer? I''m 16 right now and have been coding C++ for about 1 year, and made it to the "Moving images in 3d" tutorial on NeHe. Is there still a chance for me to make it or should i retire? // Confused or jelous or just something in between

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Of course you can do it. Sure there are exceptions, but I''d say most people wasn''t able to do any cool stuff when they were 11 years old. I did start programming(BASIC) when I was about 10-11, but I sure as hell couldn''t do any good/cool programs. When I was about 16 I learned C/C++. And I really didn''t have to much use of my previous programming skills.

I don''t understand why everybody believes that you have to start programming almost before you can walk to be a good programmer. If you enjoy doing it you can learn it. It''s not that hard.


-----------------------------
"problems have solutions
a lifetime of fucking things up fixed in one determined flash"
- The Downward Spiral, NIN

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Programming is only part of the story. You need to know about proper OO design methods and software engineering, which most (many!) people learn by taking a BS in CS.

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i don't think that 11-14 year olds can make anything cool themselves. they just copy and paste and say they made it!
how many 11-14 year olds can do vector math? matrix? not many i think

Edited by - soreno on December 9, 2001 9:11:27 AM

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IF you want to learn how to be a good programmer.. then just practice. Informal practice (non instructional type) makes you think "out of the box", but the formal way will be more detailed and fills in the holes. I remember taking a QBasic (gag) class. I learned BASIC informally by myself (from old C64 and PC development). Once I took the class, I didn''t have to look at the book... but it helped me with developing stuff by the technique he was using. It was a structured step by step pseudo programming technique on paper.. the buzz word now is genetic programming (i guess it means the bottom up approach). OO design is a concept that the big bad industry wants .. and I don''t blame them.. there has to be a standard to follow.
I acutally like C better than C++. C++ is an OO oriented language. I''m sure if you ask everyone here.. you will get different opinions.

rock on!

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16 is the best age to start programming, most of those 11 year old kids who are posting don''t know enough math to make 3D games. If you are working with OpenGL, and you aren''t quite sure you are ready for it, you should probably check out SDL.

SDL is mainly for 2D stuff, but it is really simple, and if you use it to make some small 2D games as practice, making 3D games will be alot easier.

Also, you may want to get the book "OpenGL Game Programming" if you plan on making 3D games in OpenGL. That book teaches just about everything.

For SDL, there is a featured tutorial on the main page of this site. There is also cone3d.gamedev.net, and www.libsdl.org.

Good luck. Don''t give up.

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(I sense some sarcasm in your post, but I''ll answer it seriously anyway...=P)

Game development is not only about manipulating graphics, or programming in any particular language...Being a guru in either (or both) of those areas may aid you, but is not the end of the story...In fact, many game projects employ only a handful of programmers...

As meZmo has mentioned, one of the most crucial aspects of successful game development is DESIGN and PROJECT MANAGEMENT, otherwise known as Software Engineering. Believe me, the whole design process requires a heck of a lot maturity and discipline (something that most 11-14 year olds seem to lack!)

I understand your point though; I''m 21 and in my final year of BSc CS, and I learnt how to use octrees (albeit crudely) from a 14 year old!...but I do not feel any shame in that...

Knowing how to use C++ and OpenGL is great, but mastering the general notion of programming will be better...

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Wow, thank u all for your "up-cheering" replys . I feel much better now... kinda had/have a bad day... but your replys made me feel better. So thanks alot again.

I''ll probably (99%) get the OpenGL Game Programming book for christmas, aswell as 1 or 2 other 3D or OpenGL based books.

And thanks for the tip about SDL, i''ll try that one out too.

// NeHe himself and the NeHe community should rule the world, then there surely would be no hell.

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I think there are some really young ones out there that are intelligent enough to do it... but they get bored after times.. It''s just too much simple work to them... There are only a few though parts in an engine... that''s what they solve.. they make a kewl renderer or something.. but never finish a complete game

just my 2 cents.
cya,
Phil

Visit Rarebyte!
and no!, there are NO kangaroos in Austria (I got this questions a few times over in the states )

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Hey don''t bash 14 years olds .

Seriously I know you weren''t and I get your point. I have been doing OGL for about 1 - 1 1/2 years. I find it quite difficult at times because like you say I don''t know the math.

I don''t think many young kids copy-paste code and say it''s theirs. Some do, some don''t.

Basically, age doesn''t matter at all. If you 14 or 16 or 21 it''s never too late to start.

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I agree with baldurk- it''s never too late to start making cool stuff. And 16 isn''t much older than 14. And quit flaming kids. I''m 14, I don''t just copy code, I look at it and improve on it as best I can. And I don''t make great stuff, I just plan to make great stuff. And maybe that will come sooner than later. But, hey, 16 is a great time to start, especially if you''ve been programming for a year already- who says you missed the deadline, if lots of people start taking "Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming" after a year or two of college?

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Well I started programing when I was about 10 or 11 but that was just in apple IIe basic. I started with C/C++ at about 14-15 but let me tell you I thought I was farly good, but it was not till I got in to Univarsty and started in a CS program that I learned how little I really knew, not to say that one can''t learn to be very good on there own. Programing is not all there is to it, learning math, enegernearing practis is so important to write good clean well structed code.

Any way that is just my opinion, The bottem line no you if you start now you will still have a leg up on most.

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I thought we made fun of 12 year olds wanting to make diablo 2 by next june, not think of them as genious childs

Seriously, there are not that many kids making impresive things, it might seem impresive for you because you dont know how to do it yet (kinda like a grand ma amazed that her 12 year old grand son draws things using MSPaint )

everything needs practice of course, but game development is not performing arts (like music) where you MUST start at 12 because of your muscles still being in development and such, you will do fine if you put enoght effort in it.

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Once again, thank you all! I''ve gotten my confidence back thanks to you. Looking at it now makes it seem a bit strange topic in the first place... anyway thanks alot for EVERYONES replys.

My intention was not to flame 11-14 year olds (don''t think u meant me though).

Once I get my books I''ll lock myself up in my room and just code and someday you might see a post including a link to my first demo... who knows.

Thank u all again and GL HF to the future of your lives!

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Wow, I never thought 16 would be too old to pick up a hobby =)

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A uncle of mine (who is lead programmer of a banking software company) didnt start learning to program untill he was 35 or older. He dosent make games, but im sure he could if he wanted to.

Im a smart and diverse person (Ive been to math contests 3 times , I won a statewide Electrical Wiring contest, Ive even made money for playing lead guitar), but I dont think I could have ever programmed anything of any count when I was 16.

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I''m 29 and I''ve only just started seriously programming with OpenGL.

So if 16 is too old I''d better pack myself off to a rest home!

Keef



-----------------------
glDisable(WORK);
glEnable(GL_CODING);

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Keef you crusty old man... I would have thought it would be hard to type from a rocking chair

I actually feel like a pretty late starter when I read posts like this...

I had never had anything to do with computers until I was 17. I am now 21, and have just finished a degree in software engineering/computer science (I took a year off last year to work full-time programming blasting simulation software for a mining company).

In those 4 years I have gone from semi-clueless MS Word user to being able to design and implement any number of non-trivial software systems (3D engines are the most fun though), knowing a crapload of programming languages, and generally having a good general knowledge about everything short of the actual electrical engineering involved in hardware.

Like everyone has said, if you are interested in something, learning is much easier.

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Just to add a comment, ignore end results. Focus on the process and the little immediate steps you need to make to get from here to there. It doesn''t take that long to go from absolutely "fresh" programmer to hardcore AI/graphics/physics guru; some of the top programmers (who don''t get the recognition of John Carmack or Tim Sweeny) started out as adults in QA with no experience whatsoever.

You''re way ahead of the curve.

Moderators: could we add this to the FAQ ("Am I too old/late/unskilled/whatever?")? It seems to be poppping up rather frequently.

[ GDNet Start Here | GDNet FAQ | MS RTFM | STL | Google ]
Thanks to Kylotan for the idea!

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Hmm, after reading these posts here, I also, feel too old at 23! But I don''t care! I enjoy programming (been doing it for past year with C) and I''m gonna continue! I don''t mind if I don''t become a world-wide known SUPER games programmer, but if I do, it''ll be cool

I love making stuff on computers (music/graphics etc) and I have found that programming enables me to add all of these into one, more complex creation!

I do this for fun and if you people find me too old, shoot me and put me outta my misery

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Man, I am 26 and taking a OpenGL class at the U for a tech elective. Getting my BS in CS, and I still can''t believe how much BS you have to shovel to get your degree in some schools. I am stuck here an extra year and a half trying to hash out a minor.... they didn''t have the minor I wanted (Astronomy) because of some state legislation to get money pulled to another school in the state (lame, let em compete for students dammit). I almost wish I could drop out, but I have finished all but one of the classes in my major. Bah!

Soooooooo very very tired of school (full time) and working 30 hrs a week (to pay the bills).... Looking forward to doing one or the other.... just not both.

Anyway, you younger folk. Try not working if you can when you choose to go to college. Or if you do, you might want to take a semester off here and there to make enough money so you don''t have to work the last few semesters. Engineering classes take up more time than you can believe.

Ok, enough ranting and procrastinating... back to my particle system.

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bt01011''s got a point there!

Don''t work! Takes up too much coding time!
If ya absolutely HAVE to work (Like most of us) then get a security job which basically involves doing nuffin for 12 hours, save up, get a laptop and program at work all day/night! That''s what I''ve just started doing, it''s soooo cool!
Programming for 12 hours AND getting paid for it, it''s what heaven must be like! hehe

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