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ProfKrauf

How to Get to the Next Level

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Are there some ways I can contribute to a game dev group when I'm not program savvy and I just hate coding and find it boring? I had a group last year and I organized the team, drew out some concepts for a level and found some free sprites to use, but I mostly felt like my contribution was minimal. All of the people ended up leaving the group when we barely just got a placeholder character made with a simple jump animation and a platform.

I really want to get this made and finished and so I can be a step closer to my long term goals. I just feel confused now on how to go about it. I would do everything myself, but my art skills are limited and I don't think I have a way to draw digitally or scan in stuff anyway, coding bores the shit out of me and even when people suggest stuff that supposedly doesn't use code like Ren'py or Game Maker that still feels like coding to me and then I start to lose interest, and I tried for a while to compose my own music, but nothing sounds right to me. The instruments always sound off in a way I can't quite articulate. I'm most interested in writing and level design

I just know I have to get something made so I can go to the next level.

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Reading that over, you didn't create code, you didn't create art, you didn't create animations, your role was mostly to organize the troops.

The good news is that that is one of the roles in game development.  The role of "producer" is the one that coordinates all those details, works on schedules, cheers people on, finds ways to get the project completed, and otherwise help make sure the human side is taken care of in addition to the technical side.  Some companies will split the role out and have a "people manager" and a "technical manager" job, others keep the two combined.

Game designer roles also spend a tremendous portion of their day organizing people and getting people to do things, they don't sit around creating ideas all day. 

If you consider those as your role, that you are the organizer rather than a programmer or artist, you might have an easier time completing your goal of bringing people together to build the game.

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On 6/17/2019 at 4:26 AM, frob said:

Reading that over, you didn't create code, you didn't create art, you didn't create animations, your role was mostly to organize the troops.

The good news is that that is one of the roles in game development.  The role of "producer" is the one that coordinates all those details, works on schedules, cheers people on, finds ways to get the project completed, and otherwise help make sure the human side is taken care of in addition to the technical side.  Some companies will split the role out and have a "people manager" and a "technical manager" job, others keep the two combined.

Game designer roles also spend a tremendous portion of their day organizing people and getting people to do things, they don't sit around creating ideas all day. 

If you consider those as your role, that you are the organizer rather than a programmer or artist, you might have an easier time completing your goal of bringing people together to build the game.

Okay cool.. To me it just feels like I'm not doing much of nothign and when I told my brother about my role he thought it was pointless and I have to learn programming and stuff on my own because people can just manage themselves, what do they need me for?  I do find it hard trying to find and keep people. That was a while ago when I had that team and everyone left and now I can't really do anything on my own.

 

I guess now I need to hit up anonymous people on the internet to try and get this finished?

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, ProfKrauf said:

I guess now I need to hit up anonymous people on the internet to try and get this finished?

A producer in a game company is paid and the people that do the production work are paid. Seeking unpaid help on the internet for an idea you have (and little else) isn't going to get you far unless you are also able to program or create assets.

It's almost a running gag, someone on the internet has a game idea and they want people to help them make their game.

On 6/16/2019 at 5:53 PM, ProfKrauf said:

I'm most interested in writing and level design

Being interested isn't good enough. Do or do not.

Edited by fleabay

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38 minutes ago, GWDev said:

there is no try.

...

Maybe you should try ...

 

Nice try! :D

Sorry, but I couldn't resist 😛

@topic:

I think the answer of @fleabay basically nails it.

 

Greetings

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On 6/19/2019 at 8:56 AM, GWDev said:

there is no try.

     -- master yoda

Maybe you should try to create a document outlining your idea. A good example and more advice can be found here: http://www.sloperama.com/advice/specs.htm

Oh I already have a bunch of documents from the current one I was working on and the drawn out levels and all that shit too. Had a document laying out the roles for each team member, the timeframe in which we wanted everything, done all of that.

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On 6/19/2019 at 8:56 AM, GWDev said:

there is no try.

     -- master yoda

Maybe you should try to create a document outlining your idea. A good example and more advice can be found here: http://www.sloperama.com/advice/specs.htm

Well I already did some quest design and writing for the game Skullforge.

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There is nothing wrong with working for free on a volunteer basis. 

AS the organizer and producer, it's your job to keep track of everything, and recruit a team. 

There is nothing wrong with finding random people on the internet to try and finish a game, however, if your not able to contribute any assets to the game, it might be difficult to recruit, because  you won't know what you need to finish the game. 

Try recruiting for a few months, and if that doesn't work it might be better for you to find a team to join.  

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