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TheIndieteurGuy

Getting a 3D Artist Job

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I just want to ask a few questions about getting a 3D Artist Job for Video Games.

1. Do companies consider a degree relating to 3D Art very important or will a portfolio just do fine?

2. What style of 3D art is the most in demand in the industry? Should I focus on learning how to make realistic 3D models, low poly art, etc?

3. Is it beneficial for someone to learn different art styles or should one just focus on mastering one style?

4. Are 3D Artists still in demand or is it hard to find a job opening?

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1. It depends. Where do you live? North American companies and most western European companies do want to see a degree. But the degree's title isn't crucial.

2. It depends. What kind of games does the company make? Make the stuff you want to make, then look for companies that make games like that.

3. It is beneficial. And focus is also beneficial. 

4. Yes. And yes. They are still in demand. It is hard to find a job. 

These questions are all tangential to what your real questions ought to be. If you can get a degree (if it's not impossible for you to get one), then you should. You should build the best portfolio you can. You should focus on the kind of art you're most interested in. You should live near multiple game companies.  

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14 hours ago, TheIndieteurGuy said:

I just want to ask a few questions about getting a 3D Artist Job for Video Games.

1. Do companies consider a degree relating to 3D Art very important or will a portfolio just do fine?

2. What style of 3D art is the most in demand in the industry? Should I focus on learning how to make realistic 3D models, low poly art, etc?

3. Is it beneficial for someone to learn different art styles or should one just focus on mastering one style?

4. Are 3D Artists still in demand or is it hard to find a job opening?

1. If your portfolio blows the competition out of the water, you'll get the job. A formal education can smooth the way. (Or it can do nothing if you don't take advantage of it.)

2 + 3. Don't worry about style, focus on the fundamentals: composition, anatomy, color theory, materials/textures, etc.
Learn the rules before you bend them, study from the masters, experiment with different techniques, find artists whose work you enjoy. These influences will eventually form into a style that is your own, and you'll that sometimes you wish you could do things differently.

Being able to adapt to different styles (because of your firm grasp of the fundamentals) will help you if you work at a company that moves from developing project Super Awesome Robots 3 to Happy Puppy Islands.
Having a very distinctive technique may mean a company will look to hire you specifically to capitalize on your popularity.

4. Like Tom said, yes and yes.

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