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malexw

Lack of Information

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malexw    122
Over the past one to two years I''ve been working on learning C++, but I''ve reached sort of a roadblock. I''ve learned probably most of what I can learn through books and tutorials including everything from basic cout to classes, but I can''t seem to get any more useful information on anything more advanced than classes. I would really like to learn about graphics, but the source code I get never works properly. Where should I go? BTW, I''m using Borland C++ 3.1

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Oluseyi    2115
First, go to Borland and get a more modern compiler. BCB5 (command-line) is free, GCC is Free and Dev-C++ is a free IDE.

Next, get a good reference/text book. I find it hard to believe that any C++ book would only extend as far as classes. Anyway, after that grab an SDK or two and hit up some tutorials. NeHe has what seem to be the web''s best-regarded OpenGL tutorials at his site, while ,a href=http://www.drunkenhyena.com>DrunkenHyena has some pretty darn good Direct3D tutorials. You''ll find more with time.

If you get into DirectX, make sure to grab the SDK docs. Nothing in text or online comes close.

[ GDNet Start Here | GDNet FAQ | MS RTFM | STL | Google ]
Thanks to Kylotan for the idea!

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AEBergen1980    122
I don''t know much about Borland''s older compilers, but simple games like Pong come with C++ Builder 5. You could see what you have for source code examples with your version of Borland.

Since you''re using a compiler that''s so old, I''ll assume you''re on a tight budget and suggest free programs you can learn basic graphics with. Get the DJGPP compiler package from www.delorie.com, get Allegro from www.allegro.cc, and go wild. To create images for your game, downlod Persistance of Vision from www.povray.org. It''s also a great program for learning how to program 3D scenes. Next download The Gimp, for all your 2D image processing needs.

PUt it all together and you have a full-service 2D game programming package with (very limited) software-only 3D capabilities. But more than enough to keep busy with for a long time.

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